Test: Admin Email

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Danielle Schreve Danielle.Schreve@rhul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Danielle,

Rüdiger Riesch has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Examining the processes that generate, maintain, and threaten biological diversity (Ref: 10053)

Theme: Evolution & Adaptation
Supervisory Team: Rüdiger Riesch (School of Biological Sciences, RHUL), Mark Brown (School of Biological Sciences, RHUL)

Description:

Research in my group addresses one of the fundamental questions in evolutionary ecology: what are the ecological and evolutionary processes that generate, maintain, and constrain/threaten biological diversity? In particular, we are interested in population divergence and ecological speciation as a result of divergent natural selection between ecologically different environments (both natural and human-induced). Using integrative and highly collaborative approaches, we try to answer the questions of (i) how and why organisms diversify phenotypically, (ii) what ecological and evolutionary forces shape reproductive barriers important in facilitating an initial reduction in gene flow between diverging populations, and (iii) what role human-induced environmental change has on biodiversity in general, and the stability of population differentiation among diverging populations in particular. Hence, our research further emphasizes the dynamic nature of evolving biological systems also in the context of conservation. To that end, we combine behavioural, chemical ecological, population genetic, life-history, and morphological techniques that include observational studies, manipulations in the field, and laboratory experiments. We put great emphasis on comparative analyses among species and populations, and make use of different study systems (mainly livebearing fishes, mammals, and insects) that span a range of biological diversity. Combined, these systems span the full spectrum of the speciation continuum from panmixis to complete reproductive isolation, allowing examination of the different mechanisms driving or constraining the formation of new species. There are always on-going and potential research projects available to PhD students in my lab, so for further information please contact me (rudiger.riesch@rhul.ac.uk).

Policy Impact:

Projects within this framework have the potential to significantly contribute to our understanding of patterns of speciation in animals as well as how human-induced habitat alterations affect biodiversity. The student will be trained in various different cutting-edge methods of quantifying phenotypic and genetic diversity.

Background Reading:
Riesch R, M Plath, I Schlupp, M Tobler & RB Langerhans (2014) Colonization of toxic environments drives predictable life-history evolution in livebearing fishes (Poeciliidae). Ecology Letters 17(1): 65-71.
Riesch R, T Easter, CA Layman & RB Langerhans (2015) Rapid human-induced divergence of life-history strategies in Bahamian livebearing fishes (family Poeciliidae). Journal of Animal Ecology 84(6): 1732-1743.
Riesch R, RA Martin & RB Langerhans (2013) Predation’s role in life-history evolution of a livebearing fish and a test of the Trexler-DeAngelis model of maternal provisioning The American Naturalist 181(1):78–93.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear ,

Rüdiger Riesch at RHUL has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Mark Brown as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for RHUL School of Biological Sciences, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Mark Brown is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Examining the processes that generate, maintain, and threaten biological diversity (Ref: 10053)

Theme: Evolution & Adaptation
Supervisory Team: Rüdiger Riesch (School of Biological Sciences, RHUL), Mark Brown (School of Biological Sciences, RHUL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Danielle Schreve Danielle.Schreve@rhul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Danielle,

Rüdiger Riesch submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 22/10/2015 at 9:32 am. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Examining the processes that generate, maintain, and threaten biological diversity (Ref: 10053)

Theme: Evolution & Adaptation
Supervisory Team: Rüdiger Riesch (School of Biological Sciences, RHUL), Mark Brown (School of Biological Sciences, RHUL)

Description:

Research in my group addresses one of the fundamental questions in evolutionary ecology: what are the ecological and evolutionary processes that generate, maintain, and constrain/threaten biological diversity? In particular, we are interested in population divergence and ecological speciation as a result of divergent natural selection between ecologically different environments (both natural and human-induced). Using integrative and highly collaborative approaches, we try to answer the questions of (i) how and why organisms diversify phenotypically, (ii) what ecological and evolutionary forces shape reproductive barriers important in facilitating an initial reduction in gene flow between diverging populations, and (iii) what role human-induced environmental change has on biodiversity in general, and the stability of population differentiation among diverging populations in particular. Hence, our research further emphasizes the dynamic nature of evolving biological systems also in the context of conservation. To that end, we combine behavioural, chemical ecological, population genetic, life-history, and morphological techniques that include observational studies, manipulations in the field, and laboratory experiments. We put great emphasis on comparative analyses among species and populations, and make use of different study systems (mainly livebearing fishes, mammals, and insects) that span a range of biological diversity. Combined, these systems span the full spectrum of the speciation continuum from panmixis to complete reproductive isolation, allowing examination of the different mechanisms driving or constraining the formation of new species. There are always on-going and potential research projects available to PhD students in my lab, so for further information please contact me (rudiger.riesch@rhul.ac.uk).

Policy Impact:

Projects within this framework have the potential to significantly contribute to our understanding of patterns of speciation in animals as well as how human-induced habitat alterations affect biodiversity. The student will be trained in various different cutting-edge methods of quantifying phenotypic and genetic diversity.

Background Reading:
Riesch R, M Plath, I Schlupp, M Tobler & RB Langerhans (2014) Colonization of toxic environments drives predictable life-history evolution in livebearing fishes (Poeciliidae). Ecology Letters 17(1): 65-71.
Riesch R, T Easter, CA Layman & RB Langerhans (2015) Rapid human-induced divergence of life-history strategies in Bahamian livebearing fishes (family Poeciliidae). Journal of Animal Ecology 84(6): 1732-1743.
Riesch R, RA Martin & RB Langerhans (2013) Predation’s role in life-history evolution of a livebearing fish and a test of the Trexler-DeAngelis model of maternal provisioning The American Naturalist 181(1):78–93.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear ,

Rüdiger Riesch submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 22/10/2015 at 9:32 am, listing Mark Brown as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Mark Brown is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Examining the processes that generate, maintain, and threaten biological diversity (Ref: 10053)

Theme: Evolution & Adaptation
Supervisory Team: Rüdiger Riesch (School of Biological Sciences, RHUL), Mark Brown (School of Biological Sciences, RHUL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Rüdiger Riesch rudiger.riesch@rhul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Rüdiger,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 08/11/2024.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Rüdiger Riesch rudiger.riesch@rhul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Rüdiger,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “Examining the processes that generate, maintain, and threaten biological diversity” has not been updated since 11/09/2023. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 08/11/2024, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Rüdiger Riesch rudiger.riesch@rhul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 10053) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Rüdiger,

Project (ref: 10053) “Examining the processes that generate, maintain, and threaten biological diversity”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Andrew Barry a.barry@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Andrew,

David Thornalley has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

The role of the North Atlantic in multi-decadal climate change: past and present (Ref: 10066)

Theme: Earth, Atmosphere & Ocean Processes
Supervisory Team: David Thornalley (Geography, UCL), Heather Ford (School of Geography, QMUL)

Description:

During the first half of 2015, while most of the Earth’s surface was much warmer than average, the subpolar North Atlantic was the coldest on record, continuing a recent cooling trend. Is this due to anthropogenic climate change, or is it just natural decadal climate variability? Is it a sign of collapsing ocean circulation? Given the importance of this region in controlling the climate of Northwest Europe and the Arctic, as well as affecting global climate patterns, it is vital that we seek to answer this question. Moreover, oceanographic changes in the subpolar North Atlantic also strongly impact marine ecosystems, including fisheries, providing economic and conservational motivators for better understanding the variability of this region.

This project will investigate multi-decadal scale variability in the subpolar North Atlantic over both the observational period and recent past, with opportunities for comparing to earlier warm periods (analogues for future warming), using exceptional marine sediment cores. These cores allow the reconstruction of ultra-high resolution paleoceanographic records that enable a direct comparison to and extension of modern instrumental datasets. The project will use a multi-proxy approach, that may include analysis of single and multi-specimen foraminiferal Mg/Ca (using ICP-AES and LA-ICPMS), foraminiferal stable isotopes and sediment grain size. There are opportunities to focus more on ecological changes, examining faunal changes and conducting pioneering work on the use of ancient DNA to reconstruct past ecosystems.

Policy Impact:

This work will provide robust constraints on natural multi-decadal scale climate variability, of use for assessing expected future climate and ecosystem variability, as well as enabling the critical assessment of climate models used for future climate predictions.

Background Reading:
Thornalley, D.J.R., Elderfield H. & McCave, I.N., (2009). Holocene Oscillations in Temperature and Salinity of the Subpolar North Atlantic. Nature, 457, 711-714.
Thornalley, D. J. R. et al. Anomalously weak Labrador Sea convection and Atlantic overturning during the past 150 years. Nature 556, 227-230 (2018).
Hátún, H. et al. Large bio-geographical shifts in the north-eastern Atlantic Ocean: From the subpolar gyre, via plankton, to blue whiting and pilot whales. Prog. Oceanogr. 80, 149–162 (2009).

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To: Kate Heppell Danielle.Schreve@rhul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Kate,

David Thornalley at UCL has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Heather Ford as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for UCL Geography, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Heather Ford is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

The role of the North Atlantic in multi-decadal climate change: past and present (Ref: 10066)

Theme: Earth, Atmosphere & Ocean Processes
Supervisory Team: David Thornalley (Geography, UCL), Heather Ford (School of Geography, QMUL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Andrew Barry a.barry@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Andrew,

David Thornalley submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 23/10/2015 at 8:43 am. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

The role of the North Atlantic in multi-decadal climate change: past and present (Ref: 10066)

Theme: Earth, Atmosphere & Ocean Processes
Supervisory Team: David Thornalley (Geography, UCL), Heather Ford (School of Geography, QMUL)

Description:

During the first half of 2015, while most of the Earth’s surface was much warmer than average, the subpolar North Atlantic was the coldest on record, continuing a recent cooling trend. Is this due to anthropogenic climate change, or is it just natural decadal climate variability? Is it a sign of collapsing ocean circulation? Given the importance of this region in controlling the climate of Northwest Europe and the Arctic, as well as affecting global climate patterns, it is vital that we seek to answer this question. Moreover, oceanographic changes in the subpolar North Atlantic also strongly impact marine ecosystems, including fisheries, providing economic and conservational motivators for better understanding the variability of this region.

This project will investigate multi-decadal scale variability in the subpolar North Atlantic over both the observational period and recent past, with opportunities for comparing to earlier warm periods (analogues for future warming), using exceptional marine sediment cores. These cores allow the reconstruction of ultra-high resolution paleoceanographic records that enable a direct comparison to and extension of modern instrumental datasets. The project will use a multi-proxy approach, that may include analysis of single and multi-specimen foraminiferal Mg/Ca (using ICP-AES and LA-ICPMS), foraminiferal stable isotopes and sediment grain size. There are opportunities to focus more on ecological changes, examining faunal changes and conducting pioneering work on the use of ancient DNA to reconstruct past ecosystems.

Policy Impact:

This work will provide robust constraints on natural multi-decadal scale climate variability, of use for assessing expected future climate and ecosystem variability, as well as enabling the critical assessment of climate models used for future climate predictions.

Background Reading:
Thornalley, D.J.R., Elderfield H. & McCave, I.N., (2009). Holocene Oscillations in Temperature and Salinity of the Subpolar North Atlantic. Nature, 457, 711-714.
Thornalley, D. J. R. et al. Anomalously weak Labrador Sea convection and Atlantic overturning during the past 150 years. Nature 556, 227-230 (2018).
Hátún, H. et al. Large bio-geographical shifts in the north-eastern Atlantic Ocean: From the subpolar gyre, via plankton, to blue whiting and pilot whales. Prog. Oceanogr. 80, 149–162 (2009).

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To: Kate Heppell Danielle.Schreve@rhul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear Kate,

David Thornalley submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 23/10/2015 at 8:43 am, listing Heather Ford as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Heather Ford is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

The role of the North Atlantic in multi-decadal climate change: past and present (Ref: 10066)

Theme: Earth, Atmosphere & Ocean Processes
Supervisory Team: David Thornalley (Geography, UCL), Heather Ford (School of Geography, QMUL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: David Thornalley d.thornalley@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear David,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 30/01/2020.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: David Thornalley d.thornalley@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear David,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “The role of the North Atlantic in multi-decadal climate change: past and present” has not been updated since 01/06/2021. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 30/01/2020, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: David Thornalley d.thornalley@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 10066) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear David,

Project (ref: 10066) “The role of the North Atlantic in multi-decadal climate change: past and present”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Susan Jobling Susan.Jobling@brunel.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Susan,

Lesley Henderson has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Public Perceptions of Plastics Pollution – Communications and Social Change (Ref: 10014)

Theme: Environmental Hazards & Pollution
Supervisory Team: Lesley Henderson (Institute of Environment, Health and Societies, Brunel), Susan Jobling (Institute of Environment, Health and Societies, Brunel)

Description:

Plastic pollution is widespread in the environment, entering the oceans, accumulating in gyres and ingested by organisms at all trophic levels from plankton to whales with potentially lethal consequences. By entering the food chain and acting as a carrier for persistent organic pollutants there is also concern for human health impacts through the consumption of seafood. Plastic pollution is currently a hot topic. It has become the subject of an award winning documentary film “A Plastic Ocean” (2017, Netflix) headed by film producer, Jo Ruxton, of Blue Planet, Saving Planet Earth, Pacific Abyss, and LIFE.

This project involves close collaboration with Jo Ruxton of the Plastic Oceans Foundation (plasticoceans.uk/science). It provides a unique opportunity to develop an environmental social sciences perspective concerning public attitudes and behaviour to plastics in everyday life. The study involves innovative mixed methods such as visual and textual analysis, qualitative research with different stake holders and tracking public engagement via social media. There will be opportunities to conduct scientific research overseas and to shape the project in line with existing interests and expertise (e.g. sampling microplastics, working with coastal communities). A key aim is to assess the impact of media messages on attitudes and behaviour and the willingness of different publics to engage with positive solutions to the plastics problem.

Policy Impact:

By understanding public attitudes, behaviours and their engagement with solutions your research will help the Plastic Oceans Foundation to influence regulation, technological innovation and changes in business practices to create solutions to the plastics pollution problem.

Background Reading:
Hansen, A., 2011. Communication, media and environment: Towards reconnecting research on the production, content and social implications of environmental communication. International Communication Gazette, 73(1): 7-25.
Wright, S.L. et a. (2013) The physical impacts of microplastics on marine organisms: A review. Environment Pollution 178: 483-492
Rochman, C.M. et al. (2015) Anthropogenic debris in seafood: Plastic debris and fibers from textiles in fish and bivalves sold for human consumption. Scientific Reports 5, article number 14340

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear ,

Lesley Henderson at Brunel has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Susan Jobling as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for Brunel Institute of Environment, Health and Societies, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Susan Jobling is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Public Perceptions of Plastics Pollution – Communications and Social Change (Ref: 10014)

Theme: Environmental Hazards & Pollution
Supervisory Team: Lesley Henderson (Institute of Environment, Health and Societies, Brunel), Susan Jobling (Institute of Environment, Health and Societies, Brunel)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Susan Jobling Susan.Jobling@brunel.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Susan,

Lesley Henderson submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 09/11/2015 at 9:37 am. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Public Perceptions of Plastics Pollution – Communications and Social Change (Ref: 10014)

Theme: Environmental Hazards & Pollution
Supervisory Team: Lesley Henderson (Institute of Environment, Health and Societies, Brunel), Susan Jobling (Institute of Environment, Health and Societies, Brunel)

Description:

Plastic pollution is widespread in the environment, entering the oceans, accumulating in gyres and ingested by organisms at all trophic levels from plankton to whales with potentially lethal consequences. By entering the food chain and acting as a carrier for persistent organic pollutants there is also concern for human health impacts through the consumption of seafood. Plastic pollution is currently a hot topic. It has become the subject of an award winning documentary film “A Plastic Ocean” (2017, Netflix) headed by film producer, Jo Ruxton, of Blue Planet, Saving Planet Earth, Pacific Abyss, and LIFE.

This project involves close collaboration with Jo Ruxton of the Plastic Oceans Foundation (plasticoceans.uk/science). It provides a unique opportunity to develop an environmental social sciences perspective concerning public attitudes and behaviour to plastics in everyday life. The study involves innovative mixed methods such as visual and textual analysis, qualitative research with different stake holders and tracking public engagement via social media. There will be opportunities to conduct scientific research overseas and to shape the project in line with existing interests and expertise (e.g. sampling microplastics, working with coastal communities). A key aim is to assess the impact of media messages on attitudes and behaviour and the willingness of different publics to engage with positive solutions to the plastics problem.

Policy Impact:

By understanding public attitudes, behaviours and their engagement with solutions your research will help the Plastic Oceans Foundation to influence regulation, technological innovation and changes in business practices to create solutions to the plastics pollution problem.

Background Reading:
Hansen, A., 2011. Communication, media and environment: Towards reconnecting research on the production, content and social implications of environmental communication. International Communication Gazette, 73(1): 7-25.
Wright, S.L. et a. (2013) The physical impacts of microplastics on marine organisms: A review. Environment Pollution 178: 483-492
Rochman, C.M. et al. (2015) Anthropogenic debris in seafood: Plastic debris and fibers from textiles in fish and bivalves sold for human consumption. Scientific Reports 5, article number 14340

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear ,

Lesley Henderson submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 09/11/2015 at 9:37 am, listing Susan Jobling as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Susan Jobling is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Public Perceptions of Plastics Pollution – Communications and Social Change (Ref: 10014)

Theme: Environmental Hazards & Pollution
Supervisory Team: Lesley Henderson (Institute of Environment, Health and Societies, Brunel), Susan Jobling (Institute of Environment, Health and Societies, Brunel)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Lesley Henderson lesley.henderson@brunel.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Lesley,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 21/02/2025.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Lesley Henderson lesley.henderson@brunel.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Lesley,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “Public Perceptions of Plastics Pollution – Communications and Social Change” has not been updated since 22/02/2024. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 21/02/2025, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Lesley Henderson lesley.henderson@brunel.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 10014) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Lesley,

Project (ref: 10014) “Public Perceptions of Plastics Pollution – Communications and Social Change”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Robb McDonald n.r.mcdonald@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Robb,

Peter Sammonds has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

High temperature fracture and flow in volcanic systems (Ref: 10063)

Theme: Environmental Hazards & Pollution
Supervisory Team: Peter Sammonds (Mathematics, UCL)

Description:

Fracture of rock and crystal growth in veins and fractures at high temperature are important agents in volcanic system. Rock failure in the volcanic edifice, i.e. the high temperature fracture, leads to the opening of new pathways, which allows pressure to be released. On the other hand rapid crystallization can be the agent for large excess pressures to be maintained by sealing fractures. Competition between the two results in complex behaviour, which controls lava dome eruptions. However the understanding of these controls is poor. This lends itself to an integrated laboratory experimental and fieldwork campaign to ascertain the mechanics and physics of high temperature fracture growth and crystallization. In this project, the student will undertake fieldwork on Mt St Helens and Long Valley Caldera, as a comparison of two different volcanic systems, to analyse and quantify the fracture networks and the crystallization within fractures, and the relationship between fracture and high-temperature deformation, in recently erupted materials. The student will use the high-pressure/high-temperature rock deformation apparatus in the Rock and Ice Physics Laboratory at UCL to perform rock fracture experiments under conditions simulating in the shallow volcanic edifice. Fault healing by crystallization and sealing in the presence of pore fluids will also be investigated. The data generated will provide key input to quantitative geomechanical models of volcano deformation currently being developed.

Policy Impact:

Understanding the fundamental mechanics of volcanic systems is essential for volcanic hazard assessment and provide input to models built in collaboration with partners in civil and environmental protection to inform government policy-making.

Background Reading:
Pathways for degassing during the lava dome eruption of Mount St. Helens 2004−2008
(2014) H E Gaunt, P Sammonds, P Meredith, R Smith, J Pallister Geology 42, 947-950 doi: 10.1130/G35940.1
Effect of temperature on the permeability of lava dome rocks from the 2004–2008 eruption of Mount St. Helens (2016) H E Gaunt, P Sammonds, Bull Volcanology, 74, 30. DOI 10.1007/s00445-016-1024-5.
Evidence for seismogenic fracture of silicic magma (2008) H Tuffen, R Smith, P Sammonds, Nature 453, 511-415 doi: 10.1038/nature06989

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear ,

Peter Sammonds at UCL has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for UCL Mathematics, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

High temperature fracture and flow in volcanic systems (Ref: 10063)

Theme: Environmental Hazards & Pollution
Supervisory Team: Peter Sammonds (Mathematics, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Robb McDonald n.r.mcdonald@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Robb,

Peter Sammonds submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 09/11/2015 at 2:03 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

High temperature fracture and flow in volcanic systems (Ref: 10063)

Theme: Environmental Hazards & Pollution
Supervisory Team: Peter Sammonds (Mathematics, UCL)

Description:

Fracture of rock and crystal growth in veins and fractures at high temperature are important agents in volcanic system. Rock failure in the volcanic edifice, i.e. the high temperature fracture, leads to the opening of new pathways, which allows pressure to be released. On the other hand rapid crystallization can be the agent for large excess pressures to be maintained by sealing fractures. Competition between the two results in complex behaviour, which controls lava dome eruptions. However the understanding of these controls is poor. This lends itself to an integrated laboratory experimental and fieldwork campaign to ascertain the mechanics and physics of high temperature fracture growth and crystallization. In this project, the student will undertake fieldwork on Mt St Helens and Long Valley Caldera, as a comparison of two different volcanic systems, to analyse and quantify the fracture networks and the crystallization within fractures, and the relationship between fracture and high-temperature deformation, in recently erupted materials. The student will use the high-pressure/high-temperature rock deformation apparatus in the Rock and Ice Physics Laboratory at UCL to perform rock fracture experiments under conditions simulating in the shallow volcanic edifice. Fault healing by crystallization and sealing in the presence of pore fluids will also be investigated. The data generated will provide key input to quantitative geomechanical models of volcano deformation currently being developed.

Policy Impact:

Understanding the fundamental mechanics of volcanic systems is essential for volcanic hazard assessment and provide input to models built in collaboration with partners in civil and environmental protection to inform government policy-making.

Background Reading:
Pathways for degassing during the lava dome eruption of Mount St. Helens 2004−2008
(2014) H E Gaunt, P Sammonds, P Meredith, R Smith, J Pallister Geology 42, 947-950 doi: 10.1130/G35940.1
Effect of temperature on the permeability of lava dome rocks from the 2004–2008 eruption of Mount St. Helens (2016) H E Gaunt, P Sammonds, Bull Volcanology, 74, 30. DOI 10.1007/s00445-016-1024-5.
Evidence for seismogenic fracture of silicic magma (2008) H Tuffen, R Smith, P Sammonds, Nature 453, 511-415 doi: 10.1038/nature06989

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear ,

Peter Sammonds submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 09/11/2015 at 2:03 pm, listing as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

High temperature fracture and flow in volcanic systems (Ref: 10063)

Theme: Environmental Hazards & Pollution
Supervisory Team: Peter Sammonds (Mathematics, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Peter Sammonds p.sammonds@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Peter,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 05/06/2024.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Peter Sammonds p.sammonds@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Peter,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “High temperature fracture and flow in volcanic systems” has not been updated since 30/06/2021. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 05/06/2024, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Peter Sammonds p.sammonds@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 10063) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Peter,

Project (ref: 10063) “High temperature fracture and flow in volcanic systems”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Eileen Cox E.Cox@nhm.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Eileen,

Anjali Goswami has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

The evolution of complex teeth in mammals and other amniotes (Ref: 10032)

Theme: Evolution & Adaptation
Supervisory Team: Anjali Goswami (Life Sciences Department, NHM), Arkhat Abzhanov (Life Sciences Department, NHM)

Description:

Mammals are distinguished from other amniotes by a number of features, including heterodonty and diphyodonty: complex, regionalised teeth that are only replaced once. The evolution of the distinctive mammalian dentition is linked with the evolution of other key features, including endothermy, high metabolism, large brains, maternal care, and production of milk/mammary glands. Moreover, the distinctive mammalian dentition has often been called a key innovation related to the diversification and evolutionary success of this clade. For this reason, the fossil record of synapsids, the larger group including mammals and their ancestors, has been closely studied to try to identify when these features evolved via the study of dentition, which preserves remarkably well. New developmental genetic data also provides many interesting hypotheses on the mechanisms underlying this fundamental change. However, both of these approaches use qualitative or discrete data, which can miss subtle changes in dentition and dental regionalisation. New tools for 3-D image collection and macroevolutionary reconstruction allow for unprecedented analysis of the roots of mammalian heterodony, which great potential insight on the selective pressures that shaped the evolution and diversification of mammals. In this project, the student will gather a large 3-D surface morphometric dataset of tooth rows across living and extinct amniotes, including mammals and their early relatives and apply new likelihood-based approaches to reconstruct the evolution and integration of the mammalian dentition. They will also test developmental genetic hypotheses on the evolution of heterodony by collecting ontogenetic and experimental data from model organisms.

Policy Impact:

Understanding the evolution of diversity is of fundamental importance to its future conservation. Complex dentition is central to the evolutionary success and ecological diversity of mammals, and this project will use cutting-edge methods and a cross-disciplinary approach to reconstructing the early evolution of our clade.

Background Reading:
A. Goswami, W. Binder, J. Meachen, and F.R. O’Keefe. 2015. The fossil record of phenotypic integration and modularity: A deep-time perspective on developmental and evolutionary dynamics. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, USA, 112: 4891-4896.
Yamanaka, Atsushi, et al. Patterning of mammalian heterodont dentition within the upper and lower jaws. Evolution & development 17.2 (2015): 127-138.
Gómez-Robles, A. (2019). Dental evolutionary rates and its implications for the Neanderthal-modern human divergence.. Sci Adv, 5 (5), eaaw1268. Gómez-Robles, A. (2019). Dental evolutionary rates and its implications for the Neanderthal-modern human divergence.. Sci Adv, 5 (5), eaaw1268. doi:10.1126/sciadv.aaw1268

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear ,

Anjali Goswami at NHM has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Arkhat Abzhanov as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for NHM Life Sciences Department, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Arkhat Abzhanov is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

The evolution of complex teeth in mammals and other amniotes (Ref: 10032)

Theme: Evolution & Adaptation
Supervisory Team: Anjali Goswami (Life Sciences Department, NHM), Arkhat Abzhanov (Life Sciences Department, NHM)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Eileen Cox E.Cox@nhm.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Eileen,

Anjali Goswami submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 27/11/2015 at 10:10 am. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

The evolution of complex teeth in mammals and other amniotes (Ref: 10032)

Theme: Evolution & Adaptation
Supervisory Team: Anjali Goswami (Life Sciences Department, NHM), Arkhat Abzhanov (Life Sciences Department, NHM)

Description:

Mammals are distinguished from other amniotes by a number of features, including heterodonty and diphyodonty: complex, regionalised teeth that are only replaced once. The evolution of the distinctive mammalian dentition is linked with the evolution of other key features, including endothermy, high metabolism, large brains, maternal care, and production of milk/mammary glands. Moreover, the distinctive mammalian dentition has often been called a key innovation related to the diversification and evolutionary success of this clade. For this reason, the fossil record of synapsids, the larger group including mammals and their ancestors, has been closely studied to try to identify when these features evolved via the study of dentition, which preserves remarkably well. New developmental genetic data also provides many interesting hypotheses on the mechanisms underlying this fundamental change. However, both of these approaches use qualitative or discrete data, which can miss subtle changes in dentition and dental regionalisation. New tools for 3-D image collection and macroevolutionary reconstruction allow for unprecedented analysis of the roots of mammalian heterodony, which great potential insight on the selective pressures that shaped the evolution and diversification of mammals. In this project, the student will gather a large 3-D surface morphometric dataset of tooth rows across living and extinct amniotes, including mammals and their early relatives and apply new likelihood-based approaches to reconstruct the evolution and integration of the mammalian dentition. They will also test developmental genetic hypotheses on the evolution of heterodony by collecting ontogenetic and experimental data from model organisms.

Policy Impact:

Understanding the evolution of diversity is of fundamental importance to its future conservation. Complex dentition is central to the evolutionary success and ecological diversity of mammals, and this project will use cutting-edge methods and a cross-disciplinary approach to reconstructing the early evolution of our clade.

Background Reading:
A. Goswami, W. Binder, J. Meachen, and F.R. O’Keefe. 2015. The fossil record of phenotypic integration and modularity: A deep-time perspective on developmental and evolutionary dynamics. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, USA, 112: 4891-4896.
Yamanaka, Atsushi, et al. Patterning of mammalian heterodont dentition within the upper and lower jaws. Evolution & development 17.2 (2015): 127-138.
Gómez-Robles, A. (2019). Dental evolutionary rates and its implications for the Neanderthal-modern human divergence.. Sci Adv, 5 (5), eaaw1268. Gómez-Robles, A. (2019). Dental evolutionary rates and its implications for the Neanderthal-modern human divergence.. Sci Adv, 5 (5), eaaw1268. doi:10.1126/sciadv.aaw1268

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear ,

Anjali Goswami submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 27/11/2015 at 10:10 am, listing Arkhat Abzhanov as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Arkhat Abzhanov is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

The evolution of complex teeth in mammals and other amniotes (Ref: 10032)

Theme: Evolution & Adaptation
Supervisory Team: Anjali Goswami (Life Sciences Department, NHM), Arkhat Abzhanov (Life Sciences Department, NHM)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Anjali Goswami a.goswami@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Anjali,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 05/01/2021.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Anjali Goswami a.goswami@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Anjali,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “The evolution of complex teeth in mammals and other amniotes” has not been updated since 01/06/2020. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 05/01/2021, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Anjali Goswami a.goswami@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 10032) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Anjali,

Project (ref: 10032) “The evolution of complex teeth in mammals and other amniotes”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Michel Tsamados m.tsamados@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Michel,

Bridget Wade has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Quantifying temperature changes in the Oligocene icehouse (Ref: 10084)

Theme: Past Life & Environments
Supervisory Team: Bridget Wade (Earth Sciences, UCL)

Description:

The Paleogene was a time of dramatic climate change from the greenhouse climate of the Eocene to the icehouse of the Oligocene. Many previous studies have focused on Eocene temperature changes, but the Oligocene (34 to 24 million years ago) has received relatively little attention. During the Oligocene the Antarctic ice sheet expanded and contracted considerably between times of very expansive ice sheets to intervals of relatively little ice. This project focuses on quantifying Oligocene temperature change using palaeoclimatic proxies (oxygen isotopes and Mg/Ca) of excellently preserved foraminifera from multiple sites. A detailed study of foraminiferal geochemistry will build an accurate picture of how the Oligocene climate responded to the waxing and waning of the Antarctic ice sheet and provide the data to reconstruct thermal gradients between high and low latitudes.

Analyses will be conducted in the new micropalaeontology laboratory at UCL which is equipped with multiple microscopes with image capture facilities. The student will be provided with a wide range of training including foraminiferal taxonomy, stable isotope and trace element geochemistry, stratigraphy, and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, the student will have the opportunity to undertake a variety of postgraduate training workshops at UCL, attend the Urbino Summer School in Paleoclimatology and will be encouraged to present their research at relevant UK and overseas conferences. They will be joining a large and active research group in Palaeoenvironments.

Policy Impact:

Studying intervals of dramatic climate change, allow a greater understanding of the oceans and climate system. Knowledge of the climate is particularly important to society in light of current increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide which are predicted to cause rapid global warming. These records will provide the data to test and refine climate models.

Background Reading:
Pearson, P.N. and Wade, B.S., 2009. Taxonomy and stable isotope paleoecology of well-preserved planktonic foraminifera from the uppermost Oligocene of Trinidad. Journal of Foraminiferal Research, 39 (3), 191-217.
Wade, B.S. and Pälike, H., 2004. Oligocene climate dynamics. Paleoceanography, 19, PA4019, doi:10.1029/2004PA001042.
Wade, B.S., Houben, A.J.P., Quaijtaal, W., Schouten, S., Rosenthal, Y., Miller, K.G., Katz, M.E., Wright, J.D. and Brinkhuis, H., 2012. Multiproxy record of abrupt sea surface cooling across the Eocene-Oligocene transition in the Gulf of Mexico. Geology, 40 (2): 159-162.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear ,

Bridget Wade at UCL has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for UCL Earth Sciences, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Quantifying temperature changes in the Oligocene icehouse (Ref: 10084)

Theme: Past Life & Environments
Supervisory Team: Bridget Wade (Earth Sciences, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Michel Tsamados m.tsamados@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Michel,

Bridget Wade submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 28/11/2015 at 12:57 am. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Quantifying temperature changes in the Oligocene icehouse (Ref: 10084)

Theme: Past Life & Environments
Supervisory Team: Bridget Wade (Earth Sciences, UCL)

Description:

The Paleogene was a time of dramatic climate change from the greenhouse climate of the Eocene to the icehouse of the Oligocene. Many previous studies have focused on Eocene temperature changes, but the Oligocene (34 to 24 million years ago) has received relatively little attention. During the Oligocene the Antarctic ice sheet expanded and contracted considerably between times of very expansive ice sheets to intervals of relatively little ice. This project focuses on quantifying Oligocene temperature change using palaeoclimatic proxies (oxygen isotopes and Mg/Ca) of excellently preserved foraminifera from multiple sites. A detailed study of foraminiferal geochemistry will build an accurate picture of how the Oligocene climate responded to the waxing and waning of the Antarctic ice sheet and provide the data to reconstruct thermal gradients between high and low latitudes.

Analyses will be conducted in the new micropalaeontology laboratory at UCL which is equipped with multiple microscopes with image capture facilities. The student will be provided with a wide range of training including foraminiferal taxonomy, stable isotope and trace element geochemistry, stratigraphy, and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, the student will have the opportunity to undertake a variety of postgraduate training workshops at UCL, attend the Urbino Summer School in Paleoclimatology and will be encouraged to present their research at relevant UK and overseas conferences. They will be joining a large and active research group in Palaeoenvironments.

Policy Impact:

Studying intervals of dramatic climate change, allow a greater understanding of the oceans and climate system. Knowledge of the climate is particularly important to society in light of current increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide which are predicted to cause rapid global warming. These records will provide the data to test and refine climate models.

Background Reading:
Pearson, P.N. and Wade, B.S., 2009. Taxonomy and stable isotope paleoecology of well-preserved planktonic foraminifera from the uppermost Oligocene of Trinidad. Journal of Foraminiferal Research, 39 (3), 191-217.
Wade, B.S. and Pälike, H., 2004. Oligocene climate dynamics. Paleoceanography, 19, PA4019, doi:10.1029/2004PA001042.
Wade, B.S., Houben, A.J.P., Quaijtaal, W., Schouten, S., Rosenthal, Y., Miller, K.G., Katz, M.E., Wright, J.D. and Brinkhuis, H., 2012. Multiproxy record of abrupt sea surface cooling across the Eocene-Oligocene transition in the Gulf of Mexico. Geology, 40 (2): 159-162.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear ,

Bridget Wade submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 28/11/2015 at 12:57 am, listing as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Quantifying temperature changes in the Oligocene icehouse (Ref: 10084)

Theme: Past Life & Environments
Supervisory Team: Bridget Wade (Earth Sciences, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Bridget Wade b.wade@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Bridget,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 05/06/2024.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Bridget Wade b.wade@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Bridget,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “Quantifying temperature changes in the Oligocene icehouse” has not been updated since 06/06/2023. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 05/06/2024, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Bridget Wade b.wade@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 10084) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Bridget,

Project (ref: 10084) “Quantifying temperature changes in the Oligocene icehouse”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Michel Tsamados m.tsamados@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Michel,

Bridget Wade has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Size control on extinction dynamics in Cenozoic planktonic foraminifera (Ref: 10085)

Theme: Evolution & Adaptation
Supervisory Team: Bridget Wade (Earth Sciences, UCL), Andy Purvis (Life Sciences Department, NHM)

Description:

This project focuses on the dynamics of extinction with the aim of documenting changes in size preceding extinction events. Planktonic foraminifera have many characteristics considered ideal for evolutionary studies – morphologically distinct, diverse, rapidly-evolving, highly abundant, often globally distributed and high preservation potential. It has long been recognized that the survivors of mass extinction events are smaller in size. However, more recently Wade and Olsson (2009) documented a decrease in specimen size in several species of planktonic foraminifera prior to extinction, a phenomenon they termed ‘pre-extinction dwarfing’. The reduction in species’ size 2-20 kyr before extinction suggests an adaptive response to less favourable environmental conditions. Further detailed quantitative morphometric analyses, on expanded sedimentary sequences are needed to establish size related trends associated with extinction in the pelagic realm and to fully capture size changes on thousand-year timescales. Key lineages will be analyzed using morphometric techniques to document stratigraphic variation in size and shape. Stable isotope analyses will determine whether changes in size were linked with climatic change and/or variations in water column structure.

Analyses will be conducted in the new micropalaeontology laboratory at UCL which is equipped with multiple microscopes with image capture facilities. The student will be provided with a wide range of training including planktonic foraminiferal taxonomy, stratigraphy, morphometric analyses and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, the student will have the opportunity to undertake a variety of postgraduate training workshops at UCL and will be encouraged to present their research at relevant UK and overseas conferences.

Policy Impact:

This project will provide fundamental insights into plankton response to environmental stress and has implications for size changes in the modern oceans in response to climatic change.

Background Reading:
Wade, B.S., Berggren, W.A. and Olsson, R.K. 2007. The biostratigraphy and paleobiology of Oligocene planktonic foraminifera from the equatorial Pacific Ocean (ODP Site 1218). Marine Micropaleontology, 62: 167-179.
Wade, B.S. and Twitchett, R., 2009. Extinction, dwarfing and the Lilliput effect. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 284: 1-3.
Wade, B.S. and Olsson, R.K., 2009. Investigation of pre-extinction dwarfing in Cenozoic planktonic foraminifera. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 284: 39-46.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To: Eileen Cox E.Cox@nhm.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Eileen,

Bridget Wade at UCL has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Andy Purvis as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for UCL Earth Sciences, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Andy Purvis is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Size control on extinction dynamics in Cenozoic planktonic foraminifera (Ref: 10085)

Theme: Evolution & Adaptation
Supervisory Team: Bridget Wade (Earth Sciences, UCL), Andy Purvis (Life Sciences Department, NHM)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Michel Tsamados m.tsamados@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Michel,

Bridget Wade submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 30/11/2015 at 12:49 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Size control on extinction dynamics in Cenozoic planktonic foraminifera (Ref: 10085)

Theme: Evolution & Adaptation
Supervisory Team: Bridget Wade (Earth Sciences, UCL), Andy Purvis (Life Sciences Department, NHM)

Description:

This project focuses on the dynamics of extinction with the aim of documenting changes in size preceding extinction events. Planktonic foraminifera have many characteristics considered ideal for evolutionary studies – morphologically distinct, diverse, rapidly-evolving, highly abundant, often globally distributed and high preservation potential. It has long been recognized that the survivors of mass extinction events are smaller in size. However, more recently Wade and Olsson (2009) documented a decrease in specimen size in several species of planktonic foraminifera prior to extinction, a phenomenon they termed ‘pre-extinction dwarfing’. The reduction in species’ size 2-20 kyr before extinction suggests an adaptive response to less favourable environmental conditions. Further detailed quantitative morphometric analyses, on expanded sedimentary sequences are needed to establish size related trends associated with extinction in the pelagic realm and to fully capture size changes on thousand-year timescales. Key lineages will be analyzed using morphometric techniques to document stratigraphic variation in size and shape. Stable isotope analyses will determine whether changes in size were linked with climatic change and/or variations in water column structure.

Analyses will be conducted in the new micropalaeontology laboratory at UCL which is equipped with multiple microscopes with image capture facilities. The student will be provided with a wide range of training including planktonic foraminiferal taxonomy, stratigraphy, morphometric analyses and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, the student will have the opportunity to undertake a variety of postgraduate training workshops at UCL and will be encouraged to present their research at relevant UK and overseas conferences.

Policy Impact:

This project will provide fundamental insights into plankton response to environmental stress and has implications for size changes in the modern oceans in response to climatic change.

Background Reading:
Wade, B.S., Berggren, W.A. and Olsson, R.K. 2007. The biostratigraphy and paleobiology of Oligocene planktonic foraminifera from the equatorial Pacific Ocean (ODP Site 1218). Marine Micropaleontology, 62: 167-179.
Wade, B.S. and Twitchett, R., 2009. Extinction, dwarfing and the Lilliput effect. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 284: 1-3.
Wade, B.S. and Olsson, R.K., 2009. Investigation of pre-extinction dwarfing in Cenozoic planktonic foraminifera. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 284: 39-46.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To: Eileen Cox E.Cox@nhm.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear Eileen,

Bridget Wade submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 30/11/2015 at 12:49 pm, listing Andy Purvis as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Andy Purvis is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Size control on extinction dynamics in Cenozoic planktonic foraminifera (Ref: 10085)

Theme: Evolution & Adaptation
Supervisory Team: Bridget Wade (Earth Sciences, UCL), Andy Purvis (Life Sciences Department, NHM)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Bridget Wade b.wade@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Bridget,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 05/06/2024.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Bridget Wade b.wade@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Bridget,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “Size control on extinction dynamics in Cenozoic planktonic foraminifera” has not been updated since 30/06/2021. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 05/06/2024, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Bridget Wade b.wade@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 10085) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Bridget,

Project (ref: 10085) “Size control on extinction dynamics in Cenozoic planktonic foraminifera”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Michel Tsamados m.tsamados@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Michel,

Paul Upchurch has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

The Evolutionary and biogeographic impact of the break up of Gondwana during the Cretaceous and Cenozoic (Ref: 10070)

Theme: Past Life & Environments
Supervisory Team: Paul Upchurch (Earth Sciences, UCL), Julia Day (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL)

Description:

The break up of the supercontinent Gondwana started ~160 Million years ago and resulted in the southern continents we know today (Africa, Antarctica, Australia, Madagascar, India and South America). These events are widely believed to have had a major impact on the evolutionary history and biogeographic distributions of animals and plants, resulting in vicariance and dispersal patterns that can still be detected today. A range of new methods have become available recently, including approaches for uniting fossil and extant taxa in dated phylogenetic trees, and the analysis of biogeographic history using Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian approaches. In this project, the student will gather information on the phylogenetic relationships and analyze these for biogeographic patterns in order to test major hypotheses about the roles of vicariance and trans-oceanic dispersal in determining the geographic distributions of southern hemisphere vertebrates. There will be an opportunity to select a vertebrate clade of particular interest (e.g. turtles) and focus on them in order to create new morphological and molecular data sets for the generation of dated phylogenies. Aside from contributing to the wider biogeographic data set, such trees will yield valuable information on divergence times and diversification rates that can be used to examine how Gondwanan break- up promoted or retarded evolutionary radiations. This project will provide an excellent opportunity for the student to learn: vertebrate anatomy and systematics; cutting-edge analytical phylogenetic and biogeographic tools; wider statistical skills; molecular and palaeobiological data collection methods; and oral and written presentation skills.

Policy Impact:

This project will look at interactions between Earth System processes (e.g. plate tectonics and sea level) and the biosphere (i.e. the evolution, extinction and dispersal of vertebrates). This fits current NERC themes relating to ecosystem evolution and resilience, Earth-Life co-evolution, and the generation and maintenance of biodiversity.

Background Reading:
Matzke, N. J. 2013. Probabilistic historical biogeography: new models for founder-event speciation, imperfect detection, and fossils allow improved accuracy and model-testing. Frontiers of Biogeography 5:242–248.
Ronquist, F. et al. 2012. Total-Evidence Approach to Dating with Fossils, Applied to the Early Radiation of the Hymenoptera. Systematic Biology 61(6): 973–999.
Upchurch, P. 2008. Gondwana break-up: legacies of a lost world? Trends in Ecology & Evolution 23:229–236.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear ,

Paul Upchurch at UCL has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Julia Day as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for UCL Earth Sciences, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Julia Day is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

The Evolutionary and biogeographic impact of the break up of Gondwana during the Cretaceous and Cenozoic (Ref: 10070)

Theme: Past Life & Environments
Supervisory Team: Paul Upchurch (Earth Sciences, UCL), Julia Day (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Michel Tsamados m.tsamados@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Michel,

Paul Upchurch submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 22/12/2015 at 10:49 am. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

The Evolutionary and biogeographic impact of the break up of Gondwana during the Cretaceous and Cenozoic (Ref: 10070)

Theme: Past Life & Environments
Supervisory Team: Paul Upchurch (Earth Sciences, UCL), Julia Day (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL)

Description:

The break up of the supercontinent Gondwana started ~160 Million years ago and resulted in the southern continents we know today (Africa, Antarctica, Australia, Madagascar, India and South America). These events are widely believed to have had a major impact on the evolutionary history and biogeographic distributions of animals and plants, resulting in vicariance and dispersal patterns that can still be detected today. A range of new methods have become available recently, including approaches for uniting fossil and extant taxa in dated phylogenetic trees, and the analysis of biogeographic history using Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian approaches. In this project, the student will gather information on the phylogenetic relationships and analyze these for biogeographic patterns in order to test major hypotheses about the roles of vicariance and trans-oceanic dispersal in determining the geographic distributions of southern hemisphere vertebrates. There will be an opportunity to select a vertebrate clade of particular interest (e.g. turtles) and focus on them in order to create new morphological and molecular data sets for the generation of dated phylogenies. Aside from contributing to the wider biogeographic data set, such trees will yield valuable information on divergence times and diversification rates that can be used to examine how Gondwanan break- up promoted or retarded evolutionary radiations. This project will provide an excellent opportunity for the student to learn: vertebrate anatomy and systematics; cutting-edge analytical phylogenetic and biogeographic tools; wider statistical skills; molecular and palaeobiological data collection methods; and oral and written presentation skills.

Policy Impact:

This project will look at interactions between Earth System processes (e.g. plate tectonics and sea level) and the biosphere (i.e. the evolution, extinction and dispersal of vertebrates). This fits current NERC themes relating to ecosystem evolution and resilience, Earth-Life co-evolution, and the generation and maintenance of biodiversity.

Background Reading:
Matzke, N. J. 2013. Probabilistic historical biogeography: new models for founder-event speciation, imperfect detection, and fossils allow improved accuracy and model-testing. Frontiers of Biogeography 5:242–248.
Ronquist, F. et al. 2012. Total-Evidence Approach to Dating with Fossils, Applied to the Early Radiation of the Hymenoptera. Systematic Biology 61(6): 973–999.
Upchurch, P. 2008. Gondwana break-up: legacies of a lost world? Trends in Ecology & Evolution 23:229–236.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear ,

Paul Upchurch submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 22/12/2015 at 10:49 am, listing Julia Day as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Julia Day is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

The Evolutionary and biogeographic impact of the break up of Gondwana during the Cretaceous and Cenozoic (Ref: 10070)

Theme: Past Life & Environments
Supervisory Team: Paul Upchurch (Earth Sciences, UCL), Julia Day (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Paul Upchurch p.upchurch@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Paul,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 10/09/2024.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Paul Upchurch p.upchurch@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Paul,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “The Evolutionary and biogeographic impact of the break up of Gondwana during the Cretaceous and Cenozoic” has not been updated since 11/09/2023. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 10/09/2024, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Paul Upchurch p.upchurch@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 10070) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Paul,

Project (ref: 10070) “The Evolutionary and biogeographic impact of the break up of Gondwana during the Cretaceous and Cenozoic”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Robb McDonald n.r.mcdonald@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Robb,

David Alexander has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Evaluating earthquake information in the light of public needs (Ref: 10004)

Theme: Environmental Hazards & Pollution
Supervisory Team: David Alexander (Mathematics, UCL), Ilan Kelman (Earth Sciences, UCL)

Description:

The trial and prosecution of seven scientists and public administrators after the L’Aquila earthquake (Italy, 2009) has shaken the earth science community to the core. However, no other recent event at the interface of science and society has been so thoroughly misunderstood.

This project will evaluate the trial, the developing situation at L’Aquila, and other seismic emergencies in which public information has been paramount in saving lives and reducing impacts. It will also draw upon UCL’s formal commitment to collaborate with Tohoku University”s Disaster Research Institute in the area of Japan affected by the 2011 earthquake and tsunami. Here as well, public information proved to be erroneous and a poor guide to needed self-protective behaviour.

The project will draw upon records of decision-making, public actions and earth science information to construct a model of communication and response. This will be tested by participatory research in areas of high seismic risk.

Policy Impact:

Through the UCL Institute for Risk and Disaster Reduction and in collaboration with Italian and Japanese civil protection agencies, the project will improve communication with the public using multidisciplinary evaluation to help improve safety measures.

Background Reading:
Alexander, D.E. 2014. Communicating earthquake risk to the public: the trial of the “L’Aquila Seven”. Natural Hazards 72(2): 1159-1173. DOI 10.1007
Alexander, D.E. 2013. An evaluation of medium-term recovery processes after the 6 April 2009 earthquake in L’Aquila, Central Italy Environmental Hazards 12(1): 60-73. DOI: 10.1080/17477891.2012.689250
Alexander, D.E. 2018. L’Aquila, Central Italy, and the ‘Disaster Cycle’, 2009-2017. Disaster Prevention and Management 27. DOI: 10.1108/DPM-01-2018-0022

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To: Michel Tsamados k.fowler@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Michel,

David Alexander at UCL has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Ilan Kelman as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for UCL Mathematics, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Ilan Kelman is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Evaluating earthquake information in the light of public needs (Ref: 10004)

Theme: Environmental Hazards & Pollution
Supervisory Team: David Alexander (Mathematics, UCL), Ilan Kelman (Earth Sciences, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Robb McDonald n.r.mcdonald@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Robb,

David Alexander submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 27/06/2016 at 1:49 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Evaluating earthquake information in the light of public needs (Ref: 10004)

Theme: Environmental Hazards & Pollution
Supervisory Team: David Alexander (Mathematics, UCL), Ilan Kelman (Earth Sciences, UCL)

Description:

The trial and prosecution of seven scientists and public administrators after the L’Aquila earthquake (Italy, 2009) has shaken the earth science community to the core. However, no other recent event at the interface of science and society has been so thoroughly misunderstood.

This project will evaluate the trial, the developing situation at L’Aquila, and other seismic emergencies in which public information has been paramount in saving lives and reducing impacts. It will also draw upon UCL’s formal commitment to collaborate with Tohoku University”s Disaster Research Institute in the area of Japan affected by the 2011 earthquake and tsunami. Here as well, public information proved to be erroneous and a poor guide to needed self-protective behaviour.

The project will draw upon records of decision-making, public actions and earth science information to construct a model of communication and response. This will be tested by participatory research in areas of high seismic risk.

Policy Impact:

Through the UCL Institute for Risk and Disaster Reduction and in collaboration with Italian and Japanese civil protection agencies, the project will improve communication with the public using multidisciplinary evaluation to help improve safety measures.

Background Reading:
Alexander, D.E. 2014. Communicating earthquake risk to the public: the trial of the “L’Aquila Seven”. Natural Hazards 72(2): 1159-1173. DOI 10.1007
Alexander, D.E. 2013. An evaluation of medium-term recovery processes after the 6 April 2009 earthquake in L’Aquila, Central Italy Environmental Hazards 12(1): 60-73. DOI: 10.1080/17477891.2012.689250
Alexander, D.E. 2018. L’Aquila, Central Italy, and the ‘Disaster Cycle’, 2009-2017. Disaster Prevention and Management 27. DOI: 10.1108/DPM-01-2018-0022

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To: Michel Tsamados k.fowler@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear Michel,

David Alexander submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 27/06/2016 at 1:49 pm, listing Ilan Kelman as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Ilan Kelman is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Evaluating earthquake information in the light of public needs (Ref: 10004)

Theme: Environmental Hazards & Pollution
Supervisory Team: David Alexander (Mathematics, UCL), Ilan Kelman (Earth Sciences, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: David Alexander david.alexander@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear David,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 05/06/2024.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: David Alexander david.alexander@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear David,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “Evaluating earthquake information in the light of public needs” has not been updated since 30/06/2021. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 05/06/2024, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: David Alexander david.alexander@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 10004) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear David,

Project (ref: 10004) “Evaluating earthquake information in the light of public needs”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Eileen Cox E.Cox@nhm.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Eileen,

David Gower has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Asian caecilian evolution (Ref: 10090)

Theme: Evolution & Adaptation
Supervisory Team: David Gower (Life Sciences Department, NHM)

Description:

Caecilian amphibians (Gymnophiona) comprise c. 200 extant species that likely represent > 300 million years of evolution. 75 species in three families (two of which is endemic) occur in Asia and have been argued to have reached there by rafting on the Indian plate during the breakup of Gondwana. Many questions surround the diversity and diversification of Asian caecilians, including: how many taxa are there?; how and when did they disperse out of India into southeast Asia?; what can Asian caecilians tell us about Asian biogeography?; what is the reproductive and early life history diversity of Asian caecilians and how did it evolve?; did Asian caecilians undergo (non-)adaptive radiations?

This comparative evolutionary biology project will use a diversity of techniques to generate morphological and molecular data on multiple major lineages of Asian caecilians. These new data will be combined with other available information and used to test hypotheses about patterns of diversity at different spatial and temporal scales, and about mode and tempo of diversification.

The project is novel and interdisciplinary and the student will receive training in a range of techniques likely including anatomy, morphological and molecular systematics (data generation and analysis), absolute and relative molecular dating, museology, macroecology, microCT scanning, X-ray, R, phylogeography, alpha-level taxonomy, phylogenetics, clade diversification analysis and, potentially, fieldwork.

Policy Impact:

New insights will be made into Asian caecilian diversity and diversification. The new data will inform debates about the evolutionary history of Asian vertebrates, and will generate results relevant to conservation assessments. The study taxa, range of methods, and spatial and temporal scale make the study ideal for public engagement.

Background Reading:
Gower, D.J. et al. (2002) A molecular phylogeny of ichthyophiid caecilians (Amphibia: Gymnophiona: Ichthyophiidae): Out of India or out of southeast Asia? Proceedings of the Royal Society B 269: 1563-1569.
Nishikawa, K. et al. (2012) Molecular phylogeny and biogeography of caecilians from Southeast Asia (Amphibia: Gymnophiona: Ichthyophiidae), with special reference to high cryptic species diversity in Sundaland. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 63: 714-723.
Sherratt, E. et al. (2014) Evolution of cranial shape in caecilians (Amphibia: Gymnophiona). Evolutionary Biology. 41: 528-545.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear ,

David Gower at NHM has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for NHM Life Sciences Department, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Asian caecilian evolution (Ref: 10090)

Theme: Evolution & Adaptation
Supervisory Team: David Gower (Life Sciences Department, NHM)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Eileen Cox E.Cox@nhm.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Eileen,

David Gower submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 03/07/2016 at 3:14 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Asian caecilian evolution (Ref: 10090)

Theme: Evolution & Adaptation
Supervisory Team: David Gower (Life Sciences Department, NHM)

Description:

Caecilian amphibians (Gymnophiona) comprise c. 200 extant species that likely represent > 300 million years of evolution. 75 species in three families (two of which is endemic) occur in Asia and have been argued to have reached there by rafting on the Indian plate during the breakup of Gondwana. Many questions surround the diversity and diversification of Asian caecilians, including: how many taxa are there?; how and when did they disperse out of India into southeast Asia?; what can Asian caecilians tell us about Asian biogeography?; what is the reproductive and early life history diversity of Asian caecilians and how did it evolve?; did Asian caecilians undergo (non-)adaptive radiations?

This comparative evolutionary biology project will use a diversity of techniques to generate morphological and molecular data on multiple major lineages of Asian caecilians. These new data will be combined with other available information and used to test hypotheses about patterns of diversity at different spatial and temporal scales, and about mode and tempo of diversification.

The project is novel and interdisciplinary and the student will receive training in a range of techniques likely including anatomy, morphological and molecular systematics (data generation and analysis), absolute and relative molecular dating, museology, macroecology, microCT scanning, X-ray, R, phylogeography, alpha-level taxonomy, phylogenetics, clade diversification analysis and, potentially, fieldwork.

Policy Impact:

New insights will be made into Asian caecilian diversity and diversification. The new data will inform debates about the evolutionary history of Asian vertebrates, and will generate results relevant to conservation assessments. The study taxa, range of methods, and spatial and temporal scale make the study ideal for public engagement.

Background Reading:
Gower, D.J. et al. (2002) A molecular phylogeny of ichthyophiid caecilians (Amphibia: Gymnophiona: Ichthyophiidae): Out of India or out of southeast Asia? Proceedings of the Royal Society B 269: 1563-1569.
Nishikawa, K. et al. (2012) Molecular phylogeny and biogeography of caecilians from Southeast Asia (Amphibia: Gymnophiona: Ichthyophiidae), with special reference to high cryptic species diversity in Sundaland. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 63: 714-723.
Sherratt, E. et al. (2014) Evolution of cranial shape in caecilians (Amphibia: Gymnophiona). Evolutionary Biology. 41: 528-545.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear ,

David Gower submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 03/07/2016 at 3:14 pm, listing as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Asian caecilian evolution (Ref: 10090)

Theme: Evolution & Adaptation
Supervisory Team: David Gower (Life Sciences Department, NHM)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: David Gower d.gower@nhm.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear David,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 03/07/2017.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: David Gower d.gower@nhm.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear David,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “Asian caecilian evolution” has not been updated since 03/07/2016. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 03/07/2017, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: David Gower d.gower@nhm.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 10090) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear David,

Project (ref: 10090) “Asian caecilian evolution”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Andy Carter a.carter@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Andy,

Charlie Bristow has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Fluvial and lacustrine sedimentation in a foreland basin (Ref: 10016)

Theme: Past Life & Environments
Supervisory Team: Charlie Bristow (Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, BBK)

Description:

The onset of foreland basin deposition in the Ouarzarzate Basin in Morocco is marked by a transition from marine to fluvial and lacustrine sedimentation. The Ait Arbi and the distal equivalent Hadida Formations have a maximum thickness of around 500m and are exposed for a distance of around 50 km along strike, with exposures repeated across anticlines and thrusts along the northern margin of the Ouarzarzate Basin.

The extent of the outcrop along strike, combined with repetition down depositional- dip and exceptional exposure in a desert environment provides opportunities to reconstruct fluvial and lacustrine sedimentation in the early stages of foreland basin development, with the objective of understanding controls of fluvial and lacustrine sedimentation and sand-body geometry. The sediments are potential analogues for Rotliegendes deposits within the southern North Sea and have Quaternary analogues within the Ouarzazate Basin.

Policy Impact:

This project is primarily aimed at training students in sedimentary geology with a view to gaining employment in the oil industry it is not expected to have a high impact.

Background Reading:
El Harfi, A., Lang, J., Salomon, J., Chellai, E.H., 2001, Cenozoic sedimentary dynamics of the Ouarzazate foreland basin (Central High Atlas Mountains, Morocco). International Journal of Earth Sciences 90, p.393-411.
Teson, E., Pueyo, E.L., Teixell, A., Barolas, A., Agusti, J., Furio, M., 2010, Magnetostratigraphy of the Ouarzazate Basin: Implications for the timing of deformation and mountain building in the High Atlas Mountains of Morocco. Geodinamica Acta 23, p.151-165.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear ,

Charlie Bristow at BBK has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for BBK Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Fluvial and lacustrine sedimentation in a foreland basin (Ref: 10016)

Theme: Past Life & Environments
Supervisory Team: Charlie Bristow (Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, BBK)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Andy Carter a.carter@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Andy,

Charlie Bristow submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 08/07/2016 at 3:58 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Fluvial and lacustrine sedimentation in a foreland basin (Ref: 10016)

Theme: Past Life & Environments
Supervisory Team: Charlie Bristow (Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, BBK)

Description:

The onset of foreland basin deposition in the Ouarzarzate Basin in Morocco is marked by a transition from marine to fluvial and lacustrine sedimentation. The Ait Arbi and the distal equivalent Hadida Formations have a maximum thickness of around 500m and are exposed for a distance of around 50 km along strike, with exposures repeated across anticlines and thrusts along the northern margin of the Ouarzarzate Basin.

The extent of the outcrop along strike, combined with repetition down depositional- dip and exceptional exposure in a desert environment provides opportunities to reconstruct fluvial and lacustrine sedimentation in the early stages of foreland basin development, with the objective of understanding controls of fluvial and lacustrine sedimentation and sand-body geometry. The sediments are potential analogues for Rotliegendes deposits within the southern North Sea and have Quaternary analogues within the Ouarzazate Basin.

Policy Impact:

This project is primarily aimed at training students in sedimentary geology with a view to gaining employment in the oil industry it is not expected to have a high impact.

Background Reading:
El Harfi, A., Lang, J., Salomon, J., Chellai, E.H., 2001, Cenozoic sedimentary dynamics of the Ouarzazate foreland basin (Central High Atlas Mountains, Morocco). International Journal of Earth Sciences 90, p.393-411.
Teson, E., Pueyo, E.L., Teixell, A., Barolas, A., Agusti, J., Furio, M., 2010, Magnetostratigraphy of the Ouarzazate Basin: Implications for the timing of deformation and mountain building in the High Atlas Mountains of Morocco. Geodinamica Acta 23, p.151-165.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear ,

Charlie Bristow submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 08/07/2016 at 3:58 pm, listing as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Fluvial and lacustrine sedimentation in a foreland basin (Ref: 10016)

Theme: Past Life & Environments
Supervisory Team: Charlie Bristow (Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, BBK)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Charlie Bristow c.bristow@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Charlie,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 07/08/2017.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Charlie Bristow c.bristow@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Charlie,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “Fluvial and lacustrine sedimentation in a foreland basin” has not been updated since 08/07/2016. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 07/08/2017, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Charlie Bristow c.bristow@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 10016) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Charlie,

Project (ref: 10016) “Fluvial and lacustrine sedimentation in a foreland basin”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Mark Trimmer m.trimmer@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Mark,

Lee Henry has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Symbiosis as an adaptation to changing environments (Ref: 10019)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Lee Henry (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL)

Description:

The world is undergoing rapid environmental change due to increasing global temperatures and intensified land use. All animals are colonised by microbes that can both help and hinder adaptation to changing environments. This includes obligate symbionts, such as those found in corals and insects, that provide animals with essential resources but can make them sensitive to heat stress. In addition, numerous symbiotic relationships have been discovered that are not essential but can provide their host with significant benefits, and this is particularly true in insects. These facultative symbionts can provide insects with important adaptation, such as protection against heat stress or pesticide resistance allowing their host to invade new habitats or buffer against environmental change. Symbionts may therefore be crucial for helping insects adapt to increasing temperatures or integral to their proliferation as pests. However, the role of microbes in insect adaptation to environmental change has only been recognised recently.

The aim of this PhD project is to understand how symbionts help or hinder insect adaptation to fluctuating environments, such as heat stress, pesticide resistance, plant virus transmission, or attack from natural enemies. The exact details of the project and model system will be based on the student’s interest, but may include:

1) Investigating whether facultative symbionts act as a ‘horizontal gene pool’ – a reservoir of adaptations carried by symbionts that insects draw from to rapidly adapt to new environments.

2) Understanding how microbes that buffer against heat stress influence insect invasion of arid habitats and countries.

3) Determining the role of symbionts in pesticide resistance and/or disease transmission in globally important insect pests.

The student will work closely with the supervisor and other members of the research group.

**Students are encouraged to develop their own ideas**

Policy Impact:

This project will reveal the importance for microbes for the survival of insects that are currently undergoing rapid declines (‘the insect apocalypse’), resulting in the loss of ecosystem services, and the proliferation of insect pests. Knowledge from this project will therefore be used to help develop practical solutions for managing insect biodiversity as well as pests in agriculture, forestry and those that vector major human diseases.

The student will learn a wide range of skills including modern molecular and genomics techniques while being part of a productive and supportive research team.

Background Reading:
Cornwallis C, … Henry L (2023) Symbioses shape feeding niches and diversification across insects. Nature Ecology and Evolution 7: 1022–1044
Wu T, Monnin D, Lee R, Henry L. (2022) Local adaptation to hosts and parasitoids shape Hamiltonella defensa genotypes across aphid species. Proceeding of the Royal Society. Series B 289: 20221269.
Henry LM, Peccoud J, Simon J-C et al. (2013) . Horizontally Transmitted Symbionts and Host Colonization of Ecological Niches. Current Biology vol. 23, (17) 1713-1717.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear ,

Lee Henry at QMUL has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for QMUL School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Symbiosis as an adaptation to changing environments (Ref: 10019)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Lee Henry (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Mark Trimmer m.trimmer@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Mark,

Lee Henry submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 08/07/2016 at 4:22 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Symbiosis as an adaptation to changing environments (Ref: 10019)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Lee Henry (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL)

Description:

The world is undergoing rapid environmental change due to increasing global temperatures and intensified land use. All animals are colonised by microbes that can both help and hinder adaptation to changing environments. This includes obligate symbionts, such as those found in corals and insects, that provide animals with essential resources but can make them sensitive to heat stress. In addition, numerous symbiotic relationships have been discovered that are not essential but can provide their host with significant benefits, and this is particularly true in insects. These facultative symbionts can provide insects with important adaptation, such as protection against heat stress or pesticide resistance allowing their host to invade new habitats or buffer against environmental change. Symbionts may therefore be crucial for helping insects adapt to increasing temperatures or integral to their proliferation as pests. However, the role of microbes in insect adaptation to environmental change has only been recognised recently.

The aim of this PhD project is to understand how symbionts help or hinder insect adaptation to fluctuating environments, such as heat stress, pesticide resistance, plant virus transmission, or attack from natural enemies. The exact details of the project and model system will be based on the student’s interest, but may include:

1) Investigating whether facultative symbionts act as a ‘horizontal gene pool’ – a reservoir of adaptations carried by symbionts that insects draw from to rapidly adapt to new environments.

2) Understanding how microbes that buffer against heat stress influence insect invasion of arid habitats and countries.

3) Determining the role of symbionts in pesticide resistance and/or disease transmission in globally important insect pests.

The student will work closely with the supervisor and other members of the research group.

**Students are encouraged to develop their own ideas**

Policy Impact:

This project will reveal the importance for microbes for the survival of insects that are currently undergoing rapid declines (‘the insect apocalypse’), resulting in the loss of ecosystem services, and the proliferation of insect pests. Knowledge from this project will therefore be used to help develop practical solutions for managing insect biodiversity as well as pests in agriculture, forestry and those that vector major human diseases.

The student will learn a wide range of skills including modern molecular and genomics techniques while being part of a productive and supportive research team.

Background Reading:
Cornwallis C, … Henry L (2023) Symbioses shape feeding niches and diversification across insects. Nature Ecology and Evolution 7: 1022–1044
Wu T, Monnin D, Lee R, Henry L. (2022) Local adaptation to hosts and parasitoids shape Hamiltonella defensa genotypes across aphid species. Proceeding of the Royal Society. Series B 289: 20221269.
Henry LM, Peccoud J, Simon J-C et al. (2013) . Horizontally Transmitted Symbionts and Host Colonization of Ecological Niches. Current Biology vol. 23, (17) 1713-1717.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear ,

Lee Henry submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 08/07/2016 at 4:22 pm, listing as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Symbiosis as an adaptation to changing environments (Ref: 10019)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Lee Henry (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Lee Henry l.henry@gmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Lee,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 10/09/2024.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Lee Henry l.henry@gmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Lee,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “Symbiosis as an adaptation to changing environments” has not been updated since 09/11/2023. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 10/09/2024, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Lee Henry l.henry@gmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 10019) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Lee,

Project (ref: 10019) “Symbiosis as an adaptation to changing environments”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Mark Trimmer m.trimmer@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Mark,

Paul Hurd has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

The Honey Bee: An Emerging Model Organism for Epigenetics. (Ref: 10036)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Paul Hurd (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL), Rob Lowe (Other, QMUL)

Description:

Insect pollinators play a crucial role in most ecosystems and strongly influence ecological relationships, stability, genetic variation in plants and floral diversity. Moreover, in farmed areas, bees in particular are needed for the pollination of a variety of cultivated crops. The honeybee is used extensively for commercial pollination and it is estimated that the economic value worldwide of bee pollinators is 153 billion euros. This represents 9.5% of the value of world agricultural production used for human food. Since the honeybee occupies a crucial role in normal ecosystem function and has commercial importance, understanding the molecular biology of this organism has huge significance to human wellbeing.
Epigenetic mechanisms represent a dynamic interface between the genome of an organism and the environment, providing a mechanism for environmentally driven phenotypic plasticity. The honeybee is an excellent model since its genome encodes three distinct but genetically indistinguishable organisms or main castes (queens, sterile female workers and haploid male drones) with dramatically different physiologies, morphologies, phenotypes, diets and behaviours. This phenotypic polymorphism represents one of the most striking examples of plasticity in any phylum.
We produce experimental models and data that describe aspects of honeybee development, genome plasticity, behaviour and nutrition-genome interactions. To do this we use state-of-the-art genomic, computational and molecular tools in combination with hands-on apiculture. Currently funded by the BBSRC and Royal Society, and with 8 research hives on-site, you will work alongside a team focussing on how larval nutrition and pesticides dictate developmental outcome and adult behaviour.

Policy Impact:

Recent decline in bee populations around the world is predicted to result in substantial economic losses and an inability to fulfill current food demand. How epigenetic mechanisms regulate gene expression in the honey bee will be of fundamental importance in understanding honey bee physiology, health, behaviour and response to pesticides, and will be of considerable interest to FERA, DEFRA and the commercial sector.

Background Reading:
Wojciechowski, M., Lowe, R., Maleszka, J., Conn, D., Maleszka, R. & Hurd, P. J. Phenotypically distinct female castes in honey bees are defined by alternative chromatin states during larval development. Genome Research 28, 1532-1542 (2018).
Dickman, M. J., Kucharski, R., Maleszka, R. & Hurd, P. J. Extensive histone post-translational modification in honey bees. Insect Biochemistry and Molecular Biology 43, 125–137 (2013).
Kucharski, R., Maleszka, J., Foret, S. & Maleszka, R. Nutritional Control of Reproductive Status in Honeybees via DNA Methylation. Science 319, 1827–1830 (2008).

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear ,

Paul Hurd at QMUL has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Rob Lowe as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for QMUL School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Rob Lowe is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

The Honey Bee: An Emerging Model Organism for Epigenetics. (Ref: 10036)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Paul Hurd (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL), Rob Lowe (Other, QMUL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Mark Trimmer m.trimmer@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Mark,

Paul Hurd submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 27/07/2016 at 11:26 am. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

The Honey Bee: An Emerging Model Organism for Epigenetics. (Ref: 10036)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Paul Hurd (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL), Rob Lowe (Other, QMUL)

Description:

Insect pollinators play a crucial role in most ecosystems and strongly influence ecological relationships, stability, genetic variation in plants and floral diversity. Moreover, in farmed areas, bees in particular are needed for the pollination of a variety of cultivated crops. The honeybee is used extensively for commercial pollination and it is estimated that the economic value worldwide of bee pollinators is 153 billion euros. This represents 9.5% of the value of world agricultural production used for human food. Since the honeybee occupies a crucial role in normal ecosystem function and has commercial importance, understanding the molecular biology of this organism has huge significance to human wellbeing.
Epigenetic mechanisms represent a dynamic interface between the genome of an organism and the environment, providing a mechanism for environmentally driven phenotypic plasticity. The honeybee is an excellent model since its genome encodes three distinct but genetically indistinguishable organisms or main castes (queens, sterile female workers and haploid male drones) with dramatically different physiologies, morphologies, phenotypes, diets and behaviours. This phenotypic polymorphism represents one of the most striking examples of plasticity in any phylum.
We produce experimental models and data that describe aspects of honeybee development, genome plasticity, behaviour and nutrition-genome interactions. To do this we use state-of-the-art genomic, computational and molecular tools in combination with hands-on apiculture. Currently funded by the BBSRC and Royal Society, and with 8 research hives on-site, you will work alongside a team focussing on how larval nutrition and pesticides dictate developmental outcome and adult behaviour.

Policy Impact:

Recent decline in bee populations around the world is predicted to result in substantial economic losses and an inability to fulfill current food demand. How epigenetic mechanisms regulate gene expression in the honey bee will be of fundamental importance in understanding honey bee physiology, health, behaviour and response to pesticides, and will be of considerable interest to FERA, DEFRA and the commercial sector.

Background Reading:
Wojciechowski, M., Lowe, R., Maleszka, J., Conn, D., Maleszka, R. & Hurd, P. J. Phenotypically distinct female castes in honey bees are defined by alternative chromatin states during larval development. Genome Research 28, 1532-1542 (2018).
Dickman, M. J., Kucharski, R., Maleszka, R. & Hurd, P. J. Extensive histone post-translational modification in honey bees. Insect Biochemistry and Molecular Biology 43, 125–137 (2013).
Kucharski, R., Maleszka, J., Foret, S. & Maleszka, R. Nutritional Control of Reproductive Status in Honeybees via DNA Methylation. Science 319, 1827–1830 (2008).

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear ,

Paul Hurd submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 27/07/2016 at 11:26 am, listing Rob Lowe as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Rob Lowe is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

The Honey Bee: An Emerging Model Organism for Epigenetics. (Ref: 10036)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Paul Hurd (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL), Rob Lowe (Other, QMUL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Paul Hurd p.j.hurd@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Paul,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 05/06/2024.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Paul Hurd p.j.hurd@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Paul,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “The Honey Bee: An Emerging Model Organism for Epigenetics.” has not been updated since 30/06/2021. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 05/06/2024, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Paul Hurd p.j.hurd@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 10036) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Paul,

Project (ref: 10036) “The Honey Bee: An Emerging Model Organism for Epigenetics.”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Mark Trimmer m.trimmer@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Mark,

Axel Rossberg has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Spatio-temporal modelling of planktonic biodiversity to resolve the paradox of the plankton (Ref: 10061)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Axel Rossberg (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL), China Hanson (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL)

Description:

The question of how species can coexist has long troubled ecologists. It is especially pressing for marine phytoplankton, where 1000s of species co-exist in areas the size of the North Sea. Hutchinson (1961) already described this paradox of the plankton by noting: “The problem that is presented by the phytoplankton is essentially how it is possible for a number of species to coexist in a relatively isotropic or unstructured environment all competing for the same sorts of materials.” The specific mechanisms making this possible remains unidentified (Record et al. 2014), and so the paradox remains unresolved. Recent analyses of plankton booms using rRNA to identify taxa (Needham et al. 2016) reveal a surprising differentiation in the times/places at which different taxa reach their abundance maxima. The aim of this project is to build a theory and a model for phytoplankton diversity on this observation. The idea is that competitive exclusion can be greatly reduced through localization in both space and time of phases where species populations are sufficiently large to actively drive density-dependent interactions, and so competition. At all other places/times the populations only change by passively responding to changes in the environment, but somehow must be “ready” to bloom when the right time has come. In the project, you will build models to test this mechanism, and identify the conditions that enable co-existence of 1000s of species that all compete for similar resources.

Policy Impact:

Phytoplankton diversity has been listed as an indicator for the status of the marine environment for the EU’s Marine Strategy Framework Directive (http://www.envir.ee/sites/default/files/lbna25187enn.pdf). However, managing this diversity will be impossible unless the mechanisms controlling it are understood. This research project address this question.

Background Reading:
Record, Nicholas R., Andrew J. Pershing, and Frédéric Maps. 2014. ‘Plankton Post-Paradox: Reply to Comment on “The Paradox of the ‘paradox of the Plankton’” by Record et Al.’ ICES Journal of Marine Science: Journal Du Conseil 71 (2): 296–98. doi:10.1093/icesjms/fst213.
Needham, David M., and Jed A. Fuhrman. 2016. ‘Pronounced Daily Succession of Phytoplankton, Archaea and Bacteria Following a Spring Bloom’. Nature Microbiology 1 (February): 16005. doi:10.1038/nmicrobiol.2016.5.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear ,

Axel Rossberg at QMUL has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing China Hanson as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for QMUL School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that China Hanson is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Spatio-temporal modelling of planktonic biodiversity to resolve the paradox of the plankton (Ref: 10061)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Axel Rossberg (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL), China Hanson (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Mark Trimmer m.trimmer@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Mark,

Axel Rossberg submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 28/07/2016 at 12:22 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Spatio-temporal modelling of planktonic biodiversity to resolve the paradox of the plankton (Ref: 10061)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Axel Rossberg (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL), China Hanson (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL)

Description:

The question of how species can coexist has long troubled ecologists. It is especially pressing for marine phytoplankton, where 1000s of species co-exist in areas the size of the North Sea. Hutchinson (1961) already described this paradox of the plankton by noting: “The problem that is presented by the phytoplankton is essentially how it is possible for a number of species to coexist in a relatively isotropic or unstructured environment all competing for the same sorts of materials.” The specific mechanisms making this possible remains unidentified (Record et al. 2014), and so the paradox remains unresolved. Recent analyses of plankton booms using rRNA to identify taxa (Needham et al. 2016) reveal a surprising differentiation in the times/places at which different taxa reach their abundance maxima. The aim of this project is to build a theory and a model for phytoplankton diversity on this observation. The idea is that competitive exclusion can be greatly reduced through localization in both space and time of phases where species populations are sufficiently large to actively drive density-dependent interactions, and so competition. At all other places/times the populations only change by passively responding to changes in the environment, but somehow must be “ready” to bloom when the right time has come. In the project, you will build models to test this mechanism, and identify the conditions that enable co-existence of 1000s of species that all compete for similar resources.

Policy Impact:

Phytoplankton diversity has been listed as an indicator for the status of the marine environment for the EU’s Marine Strategy Framework Directive (http://www.envir.ee/sites/default/files/lbna25187enn.pdf). However, managing this diversity will be impossible unless the mechanisms controlling it are understood. This research project address this question.

Background Reading:
Record, Nicholas R., Andrew J. Pershing, and Frédéric Maps. 2014. ‘Plankton Post-Paradox: Reply to Comment on “The Paradox of the ‘paradox of the Plankton’” by Record et Al.’ ICES Journal of Marine Science: Journal Du Conseil 71 (2): 296–98. doi:10.1093/icesjms/fst213.
Needham, David M., and Jed A. Fuhrman. 2016. ‘Pronounced Daily Succession of Phytoplankton, Archaea and Bacteria Following a Spring Bloom’. Nature Microbiology 1 (February): 16005. doi:10.1038/nmicrobiol.2016.5.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear ,

Axel Rossberg submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 28/07/2016 at 12:22 pm, listing China Hanson as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that China Hanson is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Spatio-temporal modelling of planktonic biodiversity to resolve the paradox of the plankton (Ref: 10061)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Axel Rossberg (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL), China Hanson (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Axel Rossberg a.rossberg@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Axel,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 08/10/2024.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Axel Rossberg a.rossberg@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Axel,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “Spatio-temporal modelling of planktonic biodiversity to resolve the paradox of the plankton” has not been updated since 22/09/2022. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 08/10/2024, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Axel Rossberg a.rossberg@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 10061) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Axel,

Project (ref: 10061) “Spatio-temporal modelling of planktonic biodiversity to resolve the paradox of the plankton”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Martin Wooster martin.wooster@kcl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Martin,

Emma Tebbs has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Satellite remote sensing for investigating the ecology of Lesser Flamingos and cyanobacterial bloom dynamics in East African Rift Valley lakes (Ref: 11991)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Emma Tebbs (Department of Geography, KCL), Martin Wooster (Department of Geography, KCL)

Description:

Cyanobacterial blooms are an important ecological phenomena in inland waters. In freshwater systems, high cyanobacteria biomass can lead to anoxic conditions, which in turn can result in fish kills. Some species of cyanobacteria also produce toxins that are hazardous to human health. On the other hand, in alkaline-saline (soda) lakes, dense blooms of cyanobacterial play a vital role in sustaining populations of Lesser Flamingos, which feed by filtering cyanobacteria from the lakes’ waters.
This project will focus on investigating cyanobacterial bloom dynamics within the fresh and alkaline-saline lakes of the East African Rift Valley. These lakes lie in closed basins and, as a result, they are highly variable systems which are extremely sensitive to changing climate and hydrological regime.
There are considerable fluctuations in cyanobacterial biomass in these ecosystems and the causes for these changes are not well understood. The remote nature of these lakes makes remote sensing a valuable tool for monitoring. Hence, the project will make use of archival satellite imagery from Landsat and MERIS to investigate long-term trends in cyanobacterial biomass.
This project will also develop novel methods for retrieving water quality parameters using new satellite platforms, Sentinel-2 and Sentinel-3. The student will carry out fieldwork at Rift Valley lakes to collect bio-optical measurements which will be used for the calibration and validation of remote sensing algorithms.

Policy Impact:

Cyanobacterial blooms have significant ecological, economic (e.g. tourism) and human health impacts, and their occurrence is predicted to increase with a warming climate. This project will develop novel remote sensing algorithms which will be highly valuable for monitoring bloom events.

Background Reading:
Paerl, H. W., & Huisman, J. (2008). Blooms like it hot. SCIENCE-NEW YORK THEN WASHINGTON-, 320(5872), 57.
Tebbs, E. J., Remedios, J. J., & Harper, D. M. (2013). Remote sensing of chlorophyll-a as a measure of cyanobacterial biomass in Lake Bogoria, a hypertrophic, saline–alkaline, flamingo lake, using Landsat ETM+. Remote Sensing of Environment, 135, 92-106.
Tebbs, E. J., Remedios, J. J., Avery, S. T., Rowland, C. S., & Harper, D. M. (2015). Regional assessment of lake ecological states using Landsat: A classification scheme for alkaline–saline, flamingo lakes in the East African Rift Valley. International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation, 40, 100-108.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear ,

Emma Tebbs at KCL has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Martin Wooster as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for KCL Department of Geography, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Martin Wooster is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Satellite remote sensing for investigating the ecology of Lesser Flamingos and cyanobacterial bloom dynamics in East African Rift Valley lakes (Ref: 11991)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Emma Tebbs (Department of Geography, KCL), Martin Wooster (Department of Geography, KCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Martin Wooster martin.wooster@kcl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Martin,

Emma Tebbs submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 11/10/2016 at 2:55 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Satellite remote sensing for investigating the ecology of Lesser Flamingos and cyanobacterial bloom dynamics in East African Rift Valley lakes (Ref: 11991)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Emma Tebbs (Department of Geography, KCL), Martin Wooster (Department of Geography, KCL)

Description:

Cyanobacterial blooms are an important ecological phenomena in inland waters. In freshwater systems, high cyanobacteria biomass can lead to anoxic conditions, which in turn can result in fish kills. Some species of cyanobacteria also produce toxins that are hazardous to human health. On the other hand, in alkaline-saline (soda) lakes, dense blooms of cyanobacterial play a vital role in sustaining populations of Lesser Flamingos, which feed by filtering cyanobacteria from the lakes’ waters.
This project will focus on investigating cyanobacterial bloom dynamics within the fresh and alkaline-saline lakes of the East African Rift Valley. These lakes lie in closed basins and, as a result, they are highly variable systems which are extremely sensitive to changing climate and hydrological regime.
There are considerable fluctuations in cyanobacterial biomass in these ecosystems and the causes for these changes are not well understood. The remote nature of these lakes makes remote sensing a valuable tool for monitoring. Hence, the project will make use of archival satellite imagery from Landsat and MERIS to investigate long-term trends in cyanobacterial biomass.
This project will also develop novel methods for retrieving water quality parameters using new satellite platforms, Sentinel-2 and Sentinel-3. The student will carry out fieldwork at Rift Valley lakes to collect bio-optical measurements which will be used for the calibration and validation of remote sensing algorithms.

Policy Impact:

Cyanobacterial blooms have significant ecological, economic (e.g. tourism) and human health impacts, and their occurrence is predicted to increase with a warming climate. This project will develop novel remote sensing algorithms which will be highly valuable for monitoring bloom events.

Background Reading:
Paerl, H. W., & Huisman, J. (2008). Blooms like it hot. SCIENCE-NEW YORK THEN WASHINGTON-, 320(5872), 57.
Tebbs, E. J., Remedios, J. J., & Harper, D. M. (2013). Remote sensing of chlorophyll-a as a measure of cyanobacterial biomass in Lake Bogoria, a hypertrophic, saline–alkaline, flamingo lake, using Landsat ETM+. Remote Sensing of Environment, 135, 92-106.
Tebbs, E. J., Remedios, J. J., Avery, S. T., Rowland, C. S., & Harper, D. M. (2015). Regional assessment of lake ecological states using Landsat: A classification scheme for alkaline–saline, flamingo lakes in the East African Rift Valley. International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation, 40, 100-108.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear ,

Emma Tebbs submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 11/10/2016 at 2:55 pm, listing Martin Wooster as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Martin Wooster is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Satellite remote sensing for investigating the ecology of Lesser Flamingos and cyanobacterial bloom dynamics in East African Rift Valley lakes (Ref: 11991)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Emma Tebbs (Department of Geography, KCL), Martin Wooster (Department of Geography, KCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Emma Tebbs emma.tebbs@kcl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Emma,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 05/06/2024.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Emma Tebbs emma.tebbs@kcl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Emma,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “Satellite remote sensing for investigating the ecology of Lesser Flamingos and cyanobacterial bloom dynamics in East African Rift Valley lakes” has not been updated since 30/06/2021. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 05/06/2024, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Emma Tebbs emma.tebbs@kcl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 11991) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Emma,

Project (ref: 11991) “Satellite remote sensing for investigating the ecology of Lesser Flamingos and cyanobacterial bloom dynamics in East African Rift Valley lakes”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Tom Mitchell tom.mitchell@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Tom,

Teh-Ru Alex Song has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Illuminate intra-crustal magma/gas transport beneath active volcanoes with very long-period tremors (VLP) (Ref: 10064)

Theme: Solid Earth Dynamics
Supervisory Team: Teh-Ru Alex Song (Earth Sciences, UCL), Chris Kilburn (Earth Sciences, UCL)

Description:

Very long-period tremors (VLP)) have been observed in active volcanoes since the pioneering work by Sassa (1935) on supervolcano Asosan in Japan. These VLPs are are often considered as a diagnostic indication of fluid and gas motion inside the volcanic conduit (e.g., Kawakatsu et al, 2000; Chouet & Matoza, 2013). However, can VLP provide a useful inference on the state of physical-chemical processes and fluid motion inside active volcanoes (Gonnermann and Manga, 2007), such as magma ascent rate, and the volume and style of upcoming eruptions? This project aims at detection/characterization of VLP in active volcanoes through analysis of multi-years continuous seismic and tiltmeter data. In particular, the project will examine the source properties of VLP and infer temporal variations of magma/gas ascent rate over single or/and multiple eruption cycles. We also aim to develop a modelling scheme to use VLP to infer change in conduit plug/wall permeability.

Policy Impact:

If VLP can be well understood with respect to internal magmatic heating and degassing processes inside a volcano, it is possible to design a real-time warning system that links to the magma/gas ascent in the shallow magma plumbing system to upcoming eruption.

Background Reading:
Niu & Song (2020), Real-time and in-situ assessment of conduit permeability through diverse long-period tremors beneath Aso volcano, Japan, J. Volcanology and Geothermal research, 401, 106964.
Niu & Song (2021), The Response of Repetitive Very-Long-Period Seismic Signals at Aso Volcano to Periodic Loading. Geophys. Res. Letter, 48, e2021GL092728
Niu & Song (2021), Episodic transport of discrete magma batches beneath Aso volcano, Nature Communications, 12, 5555

CASE Partner: ()

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear ,

Teh-Ru Alex Song at UCL has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Chris Kilburn as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for UCL Earth Sciences, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Chris Kilburn is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Illuminate intra-crustal magma/gas transport beneath active volcanoes with very long-period tremors (VLP) (Ref: 10064)

Theme: Solid Earth Dynamics
Supervisory Team: Teh-Ru Alex Song (Earth Sciences, UCL), Chris Kilburn (Earth Sciences, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Tom Mitchell tom.mitchell@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Tom,

Teh-Ru Alex Song submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 12/10/2016 at 1:56 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Illuminate intra-crustal magma/gas transport beneath active volcanoes with very long-period tremors (VLP) (Ref: 10064)

Theme: Solid Earth Dynamics
Supervisory Team: Teh-Ru Alex Song (Earth Sciences, UCL), Chris Kilburn (Earth Sciences, UCL)

Description:

Very long-period tremors (VLP)) have been observed in active volcanoes since the pioneering work by Sassa (1935) on supervolcano Asosan in Japan. These VLPs are are often considered as a diagnostic indication of fluid and gas motion inside the volcanic conduit (e.g., Kawakatsu et al, 2000; Chouet & Matoza, 2013). However, can VLP provide a useful inference on the state of physical-chemical processes and fluid motion inside active volcanoes (Gonnermann and Manga, 2007), such as magma ascent rate, and the volume and style of upcoming eruptions? This project aims at detection/characterization of VLP in active volcanoes through analysis of multi-years continuous seismic and tiltmeter data. In particular, the project will examine the source properties of VLP and infer temporal variations of magma/gas ascent rate over single or/and multiple eruption cycles. We also aim to develop a modelling scheme to use VLP to infer change in conduit plug/wall permeability.

Policy Impact:

If VLP can be well understood with respect to internal magmatic heating and degassing processes inside a volcano, it is possible to design a real-time warning system that links to the magma/gas ascent in the shallow magma plumbing system to upcoming eruption.

Background Reading:
Niu & Song (2020), Real-time and in-situ assessment of conduit permeability through diverse long-period tremors beneath Aso volcano, Japan, J. Volcanology and Geothermal research, 401, 106964.
Niu & Song (2021), The Response of Repetitive Very-Long-Period Seismic Signals at Aso Volcano to Periodic Loading. Geophys. Res. Letter, 48, e2021GL092728
Niu & Song (2021), Episodic transport of discrete magma batches beneath Aso volcano, Nature Communications, 12, 5555

CASE Partner: ()

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear ,

Teh-Ru Alex Song submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 12/10/2016 at 1:56 pm, listing Chris Kilburn as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Chris Kilburn is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Illuminate intra-crustal magma/gas transport beneath active volcanoes with very long-period tremors (VLP) (Ref: 10064)

Theme: Solid Earth Dynamics
Supervisory Team: Teh-Ru Alex Song (Earth Sciences, UCL), Chris Kilburn (Earth Sciences, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Teh-Ru Alex Song alex.song@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Teh-Ru Alex,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 28/02/2024.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Teh-Ru Alex Song alex.song@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Teh-Ru Alex,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “Illuminate intra-crustal magma/gas transport beneath active volcanoes with very long-period tremors (VLP)” has not been updated since 28/02/2023. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 28/02/2024, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Teh-Ru Alex Song alex.song@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 10064) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Teh-Ru Alex,

Project (ref: 10064) “Illuminate intra-crustal magma/gas transport beneath active volcanoes with very long-period tremors (VLP)”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Michel Tsamados m.tsamados@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Michel,

Graham Shields has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

The Cambrian explosion: causes and consequences (Ref: 10087)

Theme: Past Life & Environments
Supervisory Team: Graham Shields (Earth Sciences, UCL), Nick Lane (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL)

Description:

Charles Darwin’s great dilemma was why complex life in the form of fossil animals appear so abruptly in rocks around 520 million years ago (Ma), in what is widely known as the Cambrian explosion. During recent decades, exceptionally preserved animal fossils have been found throughout the Cambrian Period, which began 20 million years earlier, and arguably even through the entire, preceding Ediacaran Period, which directly followed the worldwide ‘Snowball Earth’ glaciations (~715 – 635 Ma). Most of these exceptional deposits were discovered in South China, which possesses the best preserved and dated geological record of the marine environment for this time. In collaboration with Chinese and UK colleagues, and depending on the student’s interests, this project would help towards a higher resolution, four-dimensional (temporal-spatial) picture of the evolutionary history of the earliest animals and their environment using one or more aspects of field geology, geochronology – the dating of rocks, geochemistry – for reconstructing nutrient and the coupled biogeochemical cycle (O and C), and mathematical modelling, in such a way as to test key hypotheses about the effects of animal evolution on environmental stability. Training in field and laboratory skills as well as state-of-the-art modelling and time series analysis would be provided as and when needed. Some of the questions that might be addressed by such an interdisciplinary study include: 1) How did the coupled biogeochemical cycles of C, O, N, P and S change during these evolutionary radiations?; 2) Did environmental factors, such as oxygen levels, or biological drivers, such as the emergence of specific animal traits, determine the trajectory of evolutionary change?; and 3) Did the rise of animals increase the biosphere’s resilience against perturbations? This last question has relevance to today’s biosphere, as the modern Earth system and its stabilising feedbacks arose during the Cambrian radiations.

Policy Impact:

The modern Earth system arose during the Ediacaran-Cambrian radiations, and so deconstructing biogeochemical cycles and their feedbacks through that transition, informed by modelling and excellently preserved rock archives, helps us to understand better which factors are important for the continued stability and resilience of today’s biosphere in the face of perturbation.

Background Reading:
R. Tostevin, R. A. Wood, G. A. Shields, S. W. Poulton, R. Guilbaud, F. Bowyer, A. M. Penny, T. He, A. Curtis, K. H. Hoffmann & M. O. Clarkson (2016) Low-oxygen waters limited habitable space for early animals, Nature Communications, 7, doi:10.1038/ncomms12818
Shields, G., Mills, B., Zhu, M., Daines, S., Lenton, T. (2019). Unique Neoproterozoic carbon isotope excursions sustained by coupled evaporite dissolution and pyrite burial. Nature Geoscience, doi:10.1038/s41561-019-0434-3
He, T., Zhu, M., Mills, B., Wynn, P., Zhuravlev, A., Tostevin, R., …Shields, G. (2019). Possible links between extreme oxygen perturbations and the Cambrian radiation of animals. Nature Geoscience, doi:10.1038/s41561-019-0357-z

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To: Chris Thompson christopher.thompson@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Chris,

Graham Shields at UCL has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Nick Lane as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for UCL Earth Sciences, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Nick Lane is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

The Cambrian explosion: causes and consequences (Ref: 10087)

Theme: Past Life & Environments
Supervisory Team: Graham Shields (Earth Sciences, UCL), Nick Lane (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

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[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Michel Tsamados m.tsamados@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Michel,

Graham Shields submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 12/10/2016 at 5:19 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

The Cambrian explosion: causes and consequences (Ref: 10087)

Theme: Past Life & Environments
Supervisory Team: Graham Shields (Earth Sciences, UCL), Nick Lane (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL)

Description:

Charles Darwin’s great dilemma was why complex life in the form of fossil animals appear so abruptly in rocks around 520 million years ago (Ma), in what is widely known as the Cambrian explosion. During recent decades, exceptionally preserved animal fossils have been found throughout the Cambrian Period, which began 20 million years earlier, and arguably even through the entire, preceding Ediacaran Period, which directly followed the worldwide ‘Snowball Earth’ glaciations (~715 – 635 Ma). Most of these exceptional deposits were discovered in South China, which possesses the best preserved and dated geological record of the marine environment for this time. In collaboration with Chinese and UK colleagues, and depending on the student’s interests, this project would help towards a higher resolution, four-dimensional (temporal-spatial) picture of the evolutionary history of the earliest animals and their environment using one or more aspects of field geology, geochronology – the dating of rocks, geochemistry – for reconstructing nutrient and the coupled biogeochemical cycle (O and C), and mathematical modelling, in such a way as to test key hypotheses about the effects of animal evolution on environmental stability. Training in field and laboratory skills as well as state-of-the-art modelling and time series analysis would be provided as and when needed. Some of the questions that might be addressed by such an interdisciplinary study include: 1) How did the coupled biogeochemical cycles of C, O, N, P and S change during these evolutionary radiations?; 2) Did environmental factors, such as oxygen levels, or biological drivers, such as the emergence of specific animal traits, determine the trajectory of evolutionary change?; and 3) Did the rise of animals increase the biosphere’s resilience against perturbations? This last question has relevance to today’s biosphere, as the modern Earth system and its stabilising feedbacks arose during the Cambrian radiations.

Policy Impact:

The modern Earth system arose during the Ediacaran-Cambrian radiations, and so deconstructing biogeochemical cycles and their feedbacks through that transition, informed by modelling and excellently preserved rock archives, helps us to understand better which factors are important for the continued stability and resilience of today’s biosphere in the face of perturbation.

Background Reading:
R. Tostevin, R. A. Wood, G. A. Shields, S. W. Poulton, R. Guilbaud, F. Bowyer, A. M. Penny, T. He, A. Curtis, K. H. Hoffmann & M. O. Clarkson (2016) Low-oxygen waters limited habitable space for early animals, Nature Communications, 7, doi:10.1038/ncomms12818
Shields, G., Mills, B., Zhu, M., Daines, S., Lenton, T. (2019). Unique Neoproterozoic carbon isotope excursions sustained by coupled evaporite dissolution and pyrite burial. Nature Geoscience, doi:10.1038/s41561-019-0434-3
He, T., Zhu, M., Mills, B., Wynn, P., Zhuravlev, A., Tostevin, R., …Shields, G. (2019). Possible links between extreme oxygen perturbations and the Cambrian radiation of animals. Nature Geoscience, doi:10.1038/s41561-019-0357-z

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To: Chris Thompson christopher.thompson@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear Chris,

Graham Shields submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 12/10/2016 at 5:19 pm, listing Nick Lane as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Nick Lane is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

The Cambrian explosion: causes and consequences (Ref: 10087)

Theme: Past Life & Environments
Supervisory Team: Graham Shields (Earth Sciences, UCL), Nick Lane (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Graham Shields g.shields@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Graham,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 08/10/2024.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Graham Shields g.shields@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Graham,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “The Cambrian explosion: causes and consequences” has not been updated since 09/10/2023. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 08/10/2024, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Graham Shields g.shields@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 10087) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Graham,

Project (ref: 10087) “The Cambrian explosion: causes and consequences”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Michel Tsamados m.tsamados@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Michel,

Dominic Papineau has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Signs of life in Paleoarchean chemical sedimentary rocks: a strategy to search for extra-terrestrial life (Ref: 10052)

Theme: Past Life & Environments
Supervisory Team: Dominic Papineau (Earth Sciences, UCL), Matthew Powner (Other, UCL)

Description:

Evidence of life in early Archean rocks is challenging to decipher because of the many possible sources of biological and non-biological organic matter in metamorphosed sedimentary rocks. This problem is important because determining that life on Earth originated within only a few hundred million years, increases the probability of life originating elsewhere, and thus, is an important testbed to search for fossil extra-terrestrial life. The project will seek to perform a detailed characterization of the nature of microscopic particles of organic matter in Palaeoarchean chemical sedimentary rocks from Western Australia, South Africa, and India. Laboratory analyses will consist in documenting, by optical microscopy and micro-Raman imaging, the mineral associations with organic matter in hydrothermal-sedimentary chert. Focus will be placed on various types of sedimentological-diagenetic microstructures, including some highly debated microfossil-like structures. These analyses will be complemented by the characterization of molecular compositions by Gas Chromatography – Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS), Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), and synchrotron-based Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM). Results will allow the recognition of indigenous organic matter and a critical evaluation of its composition in relation to the metamorphic history of the rocks. Whether or not early microbial ecosystems can be recognized in Paleoarchean chert, the analytical and scientific strategy will contribute to pave the way to search for extra-terrestrial life on other ancient planetary surfaces, including for Mars.

Policy Impact:

The research will involve analyses with a range of instruments and produce multi-disciplinary datasets and training. It is an opportunity to explore the topics of the origin of life, biosignatures for exobiology, and the earliest evolution of biogeochemical cycles.

Background Reading:
Alléon, J., Bernard, S., Le Guillou, C., Marin-Carbonne, J., Pont, S., Beyssac, O., McKeegan, K., and Robert, F. (2016) Molecular preservation of 1.88 Ga Gunflint organic microfossils as a function of temperature and mineralogy. Nature Communications, DOI: 10.1038/ncomms11977.
Bernard, S. and Papineau, D. (2014) Graphitic carbons and biosignatures. Elements 10, 435-440.
Dodd, M.S., Papineau, D., Grenne, T., Slack, J.F., Rittner, M., Pirajno, F., O’Neil, J., and Little, C.T.S. (2017) Evidence for early life in Earth’s oldest hydrothermal vent precipitates. Nature 543, 60-64, DOI 10.1038/nature21377.DOI 10.1038/nature21377.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To: Kevin Fowler k.fowler@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Kevin,

Dominic Papineau at UCL has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Matthew Powner as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for UCL Earth Sciences, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Matthew Powner is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Signs of life in Paleoarchean chemical sedimentary rocks: a strategy to search for extra-terrestrial life (Ref: 10052)

Theme: Past Life & Environments
Supervisory Team: Dominic Papineau (Earth Sciences, UCL), Matthew Powner (Other, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Michel Tsamados m.tsamados@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Michel,

Dominic Papineau submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 20/10/2016 at 2:13 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Signs of life in Paleoarchean chemical sedimentary rocks: a strategy to search for extra-terrestrial life (Ref: 10052)

Theme: Past Life & Environments
Supervisory Team: Dominic Papineau (Earth Sciences, UCL), Matthew Powner (Other, UCL)

Description:

Evidence of life in early Archean rocks is challenging to decipher because of the many possible sources of biological and non-biological organic matter in metamorphosed sedimentary rocks. This problem is important because determining that life on Earth originated within only a few hundred million years, increases the probability of life originating elsewhere, and thus, is an important testbed to search for fossil extra-terrestrial life. The project will seek to perform a detailed characterization of the nature of microscopic particles of organic matter in Palaeoarchean chemical sedimentary rocks from Western Australia, South Africa, and India. Laboratory analyses will consist in documenting, by optical microscopy and micro-Raman imaging, the mineral associations with organic matter in hydrothermal-sedimentary chert. Focus will be placed on various types of sedimentological-diagenetic microstructures, including some highly debated microfossil-like structures. These analyses will be complemented by the characterization of molecular compositions by Gas Chromatography – Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS), Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), and synchrotron-based Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM). Results will allow the recognition of indigenous organic matter and a critical evaluation of its composition in relation to the metamorphic history of the rocks. Whether or not early microbial ecosystems can be recognized in Paleoarchean chert, the analytical and scientific strategy will contribute to pave the way to search for extra-terrestrial life on other ancient planetary surfaces, including for Mars.

Policy Impact:

The research will involve analyses with a range of instruments and produce multi-disciplinary datasets and training. It is an opportunity to explore the topics of the origin of life, biosignatures for exobiology, and the earliest evolution of biogeochemical cycles.

Background Reading:
Alléon, J., Bernard, S., Le Guillou, C., Marin-Carbonne, J., Pont, S., Beyssac, O., McKeegan, K., and Robert, F. (2016) Molecular preservation of 1.88 Ga Gunflint organic microfossils as a function of temperature and mineralogy. Nature Communications, DOI: 10.1038/ncomms11977.
Bernard, S. and Papineau, D. (2014) Graphitic carbons and biosignatures. Elements 10, 435-440.
Dodd, M.S., Papineau, D., Grenne, T., Slack, J.F., Rittner, M., Pirajno, F., O’Neil, J., and Little, C.T.S. (2017) Evidence for early life in Earth’s oldest hydrothermal vent precipitates. Nature 543, 60-64, DOI 10.1038/nature21377.DOI 10.1038/nature21377.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To: Kevin Fowler k.fowler@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear Kevin,

Dominic Papineau submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 20/10/2016 at 2:13 pm, listing Matthew Powner as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Matthew Powner is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Signs of life in Paleoarchean chemical sedimentary rocks: a strategy to search for extra-terrestrial life (Ref: 10052)

Theme: Past Life & Environments
Supervisory Team: Dominic Papineau (Earth Sciences, UCL), Matthew Powner (Other, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Dominic Papineau d.papineau@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Dominic,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 10/09/2024.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Dominic Papineau d.papineau@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Dominic,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “Signs of life in Paleoarchean chemical sedimentary rocks: a strategy to search for extra-terrestrial life” has not been updated since 11/09/2023. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 10/09/2024, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Dominic Papineau d.papineau@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 10052) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Dominic,

Project (ref: 10052) “Signs of life in Paleoarchean chemical sedimentary rocks: a strategy to search for extra-terrestrial life”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Andrew Barry a.barry@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Andrew,

Chris Brierley has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Constraining future climate projections (Ref: 10076)

Theme: Earth, Atmosphere & Ocean Processes
Supervisory Team: Chris Brierley (Geography, UCL), Richard Chandler (Statistical Science, UCL)

Description:

Projections of the future changes in multiple climate hazards and resulting multiple risks to ecosystems and humans are an essential tool to enable adaptation. Yet finding the best way to combine all the available information with decision-relevant uncertainties remains an unresolved challenge. This PhD project combines climate, impacts and data science to tackle this key issue, using two complementary approaches. You would build on recent methodological developments to derive projections of climate impacts that draw on the information available in existing ensembles of climate projections. Using a Bayesian framework, you would apply observational constraints to take full advantage of the information currently available to create mode more comprehensive and defensibly climate projections. You would also look to incorporate palaeo-observational constraints under the past2future working group of PMIP4.

Policy Impact:

The application of observational constraints would provide improved future forecasts.

Background Reading:
Chandler, 2013; Exploiting strength, discounting weakness: combining information from multiple climate simulators
Schmidt et al, 2014; Using paleo-climate comparisons to constrain future projections in CMIP5
Nijsse et al 2021; Emergent constraints on transient climate response (TCR) and equilibrium climate sensitivity (ECS) from historical warming in CMIP5 and CMIP6 models

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To: Richard Chandler r.chandler@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Richard,

Chris Brierley at UCL has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Richard Chandler as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for UCL Geography, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Richard Chandler is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Constraining future climate projections (Ref: 10076)

Theme: Earth, Atmosphere & Ocean Processes
Supervisory Team: Chris Brierley (Geography, UCL), Richard Chandler (Statistical Science, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Andrew Barry a.barry@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Andrew,

Chris Brierley submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 21/10/2016 at 12:56 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Constraining future climate projections (Ref: 10076)

Theme: Earth, Atmosphere & Ocean Processes
Supervisory Team: Chris Brierley (Geography, UCL), Richard Chandler (Statistical Science, UCL)

Description:

Projections of the future changes in multiple climate hazards and resulting multiple risks to ecosystems and humans are an essential tool to enable adaptation. Yet finding the best way to combine all the available information with decision-relevant uncertainties remains an unresolved challenge. This PhD project combines climate, impacts and data science to tackle this key issue, using two complementary approaches. You would build on recent methodological developments to derive projections of climate impacts that draw on the information available in existing ensembles of climate projections. Using a Bayesian framework, you would apply observational constraints to take full advantage of the information currently available to create mode more comprehensive and defensibly climate projections. You would also look to incorporate palaeo-observational constraints under the past2future working group of PMIP4.

Policy Impact:

The application of observational constraints would provide improved future forecasts.

Background Reading:
Chandler, 2013; Exploiting strength, discounting weakness: combining information from multiple climate simulators
Schmidt et al, 2014; Using paleo-climate comparisons to constrain future projections in CMIP5
Nijsse et al 2021; Emergent constraints on transient climate response (TCR) and equilibrium climate sensitivity (ECS) from historical warming in CMIP5 and CMIP6 models

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To: Richard Chandler r.chandler@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear Richard,

Chris Brierley submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 21/10/2016 at 12:56 pm, listing Richard Chandler as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Richard Chandler is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Constraining future climate projections (Ref: 10076)

Theme: Earth, Atmosphere & Ocean Processes
Supervisory Team: Chris Brierley (Geography, UCL), Richard Chandler (Statistical Science, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Chris Brierley c.brierley@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Chris,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 10/09/2024.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Chris Brierley c.brierley@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Chris,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “Constraining future climate projections” has not been updated since 11/09/2023. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 10/09/2024, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Chris Brierley c.brierley@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 10076) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Chris,

Project (ref: 10076) “Constraining future climate projections”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Andrew Pomiankowski a.pomiankowski@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Andrew,

Seirian Sumner has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Why should the world care about wasps? Ecological and economic importance of wasps (Ref: 12716)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Seirian Sumner (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL)

Description:

Wasps are one of the most biodiverse groups in the animal kingdom. They are more speciose than ants (11,000 spp), and bees (20,000 spp). Recent research suggests that 18% of UK predatory wasps are declining at 30% or more per decade. This is worse than bees, where 10-12% of species are declining at 30% per decade. Wasps are thought to play pivotal roles in ecosystems, as predators of a wide range of arthropods. This also makes them of economic value as pest controllers, as well as ecological value in control of natural arthropod populations. However, we lack any quantitative measure of the economic and ecological value of predatory wasps. In contrast, we have many estimates of the monetary value of bees and parasitoid wasps. The decline of key natural pest controllers, like wasps, may have serious knock-on effects in the natural environment as ecosystem servicers, and/or economic and environmental implications for our agricultural practices and food security. This project will be the first attempt to quantify the economic and ecological value of predatory wasps. This has important implications for agricultural practices as well as the impact as ecosystem servicers in natural environments.

Research questions include:
• What arthropod species do wasps predate on? Metagenomic next-generation sequencing will be used to identify prey in the guts of wasp larvae.
• How effective are predatory wasps in controlling arthropod populations? Field experiments will be used to determine the impact of social wasps as biocontrol agents in agricultural/natural ecosystems.
• How will declining populations of predatory wasps impact on agricultural and/or natural ecosystems? Bayesian Modelling methods will be used to predict the effects of wasp declines on arthropod populations.

Non-DTP co-supervisors include Prof Bill Symondson, University of Cardiff, and Dr Nick Isaac, Centre for Ecology and Hydrology.

Policy Impact:

Insects offer essential ecosystem services to natural and farmed landscapes. The importance of pollinators is well established. However, little is know about the importance of top insect predators, like the social wasps, in bio-control. This information is vital for predicting the future impact of declining populations of insects, conserving natural ecosystems, and managing a sustainable agricultural system.

Background Reading:
Sumner, S., Law, G. & Cini, A. (2018) Why we love bees and hate wasps. Ecological Entomology. https://doi.org/10.1111/een.12676
Brock, Cini & Sumner 2021 Ecosystem services provided by aculeate wasps. Biological Reviews. https://doi.org/10.1111/brv.12719
Symondson, W.O.C., Sunderland, K.D. & Greenstone, M.H., 2002. Can generalist predators be effective biocontrol agents? Annual Review of Entomology, 47 (1), pp. 561-594.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To: m.trimmer@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear ,

Seirian Sumner at UCL has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for UCL Genetics, Evolution and Environment, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Why should the world care about wasps? Ecological and economic importance of wasps (Ref: 12716)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Seirian Sumner (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Andrew Pomiankowski a.pomiankowski@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Andrew,

Seirian Sumner submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 22/11/2016 at 10:08 am. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Why should the world care about wasps? Ecological and economic importance of wasps (Ref: 12716)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Seirian Sumner (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL)

Description:

Wasps are one of the most biodiverse groups in the animal kingdom. They are more speciose than ants (11,000 spp), and bees (20,000 spp). Recent research suggests that 18% of UK predatory wasps are declining at 30% or more per decade. This is worse than bees, where 10-12% of species are declining at 30% per decade. Wasps are thought to play pivotal roles in ecosystems, as predators of a wide range of arthropods. This also makes them of economic value as pest controllers, as well as ecological value in control of natural arthropod populations. However, we lack any quantitative measure of the economic and ecological value of predatory wasps. In contrast, we have many estimates of the monetary value of bees and parasitoid wasps. The decline of key natural pest controllers, like wasps, may have serious knock-on effects in the natural environment as ecosystem servicers, and/or economic and environmental implications for our agricultural practices and food security. This project will be the first attempt to quantify the economic and ecological value of predatory wasps. This has important implications for agricultural practices as well as the impact as ecosystem servicers in natural environments.

Research questions include:
• What arthropod species do wasps predate on? Metagenomic next-generation sequencing will be used to identify prey in the guts of wasp larvae.
• How effective are predatory wasps in controlling arthropod populations? Field experiments will be used to determine the impact of social wasps as biocontrol agents in agricultural/natural ecosystems.
• How will declining populations of predatory wasps impact on agricultural and/or natural ecosystems? Bayesian Modelling methods will be used to predict the effects of wasp declines on arthropod populations.

Non-DTP co-supervisors include Prof Bill Symondson, University of Cardiff, and Dr Nick Isaac, Centre for Ecology and Hydrology.

Policy Impact:

Insects offer essential ecosystem services to natural and farmed landscapes. The importance of pollinators is well established. However, little is know about the importance of top insect predators, like the social wasps, in bio-control. This information is vital for predicting the future impact of declining populations of insects, conserving natural ecosystems, and managing a sustainable agricultural system.

Background Reading:
Sumner, S., Law, G. & Cini, A. (2018) Why we love bees and hate wasps. Ecological Entomology. https://doi.org/10.1111/een.12676
Brock, Cini & Sumner 2021 Ecosystem services provided by aculeate wasps. Biological Reviews. https://doi.org/10.1111/brv.12719
Symondson, W.O.C., Sunderland, K.D. & Greenstone, M.H., 2002. Can generalist predators be effective biocontrol agents? Annual Review of Entomology, 47 (1), pp. 561-594.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To: m.trimmer@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear ,

Seirian Sumner submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 22/11/2016 at 10:08 am, listing as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Why should the world care about wasps? Ecological and economic importance of wasps (Ref: 12716)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Seirian Sumner (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Seirian Sumner s.sumner@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Seirian,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 17/10/2023.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Seirian Sumner s.sumner@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Seirian,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “Why should the world care about wasps? Ecological and economic importance of wasps” has not been updated since 10/05/2023. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 17/10/2023, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Seirian Sumner s.sumner@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 12716) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Seirian,

Project (ref: 12716) “Why should the world care about wasps? Ecological and economic importance of wasps”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Chris Carbone Chris.Carbone@zsl.org
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Chris,

Patricia Brekke has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Ageing in the wild and how to manage it (Ref: 12945)

Theme: Evolution & Adaptation
Supervisory Team: Patricia Brekke (, IOZ), Francois Balloux (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL)

Description:

Until recently, it was widely believed that individual’s in the wild died before they aged and did not senesce. However, over the last decade it has become apparent that senescence is widespread in the animal kingdom and that senescence rates (including magnitude and fitness consequences) vary among species, populations and individuals (e.g. Jones et al. 2014; Jones et al. 2008; Nussey et al. 2013). Both survival and reproduction decrease with age in birds and mammals. Senescence can therefore have a negative impact on the vital rates that influence population growth and persistence. Management can play a role in regulating some of the effects of senescence in populations of conservation concern by mitigating some of the factors that play a role in mortality in wild populations. For example, via predator and disease control and the provision of food and shelter. There is also strong evidence that conservation management can have a strong impact on senescence dynamics, with captive populations of threatened species having significantly different senescence profiles than their wild counterparts (Lemaître et al. 2013). Despite this, it is only now that the impact of senescence on populations of conservation concern is being explored. A comparative study by Robert et al. (2015) has shown that senescence can negatively impact the dynamics of threatened wild mammal populations and increase the risk of extinction. However, empirical evidence on identity and mechanisms of factors that drive this variation in senescence patterns in threatened populations, and the role of conservation management in regulating this effect are still to emerge.
The proposed project aims to combine environmental, demographic, genetic and life-history data on the long-term reintroduction programme for the New Zealand hihi (Notiomystis cincta) to determine the factors that drive senescence patterns in this species and test, using the establishment history and variation in management strategies, the effects that conservation management has on senescence and its long-term repercussions on population viability. The project will involve field work in New Zealand, lab work in the UK and Bayesian modelling in Denmark.

Policy Impact:

The proposed project will help bridge the gap between evolutionary theory and conservation practice by providing insight into how to incorporate senescence patterns into the management programmes of threatened species to reduce the bias in extinction risk prediction.

Background Reading:
Actuarial senescence can increase the risk of extinction of mammal populations
Diversity of ageing across the tree of life
Comparing free-ranging and captive populations reveals intra-specific variation in aging rates in large herbivores

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To: Andrew Pomiankowski a.pomiankowski@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Andrew,

Patricia Brekke at IOZ has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Francois Balloux as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for IOZ , but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Francois Balloux is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Ageing in the wild and how to manage it (Ref: 12945)

Theme: Evolution & Adaptation
Supervisory Team: Patricia Brekke (, IOZ), Francois Balloux (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Chris Carbone Chris.Carbone@zsl.org
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Chris,

Patricia Brekke submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 01/12/2016 at 5:55 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Ageing in the wild and how to manage it (Ref: 12945)

Theme: Evolution & Adaptation
Supervisory Team: Patricia Brekke (, IOZ), Francois Balloux (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL)

Description:

Until recently, it was widely believed that individual’s in the wild died before they aged and did not senesce. However, over the last decade it has become apparent that senescence is widespread in the animal kingdom and that senescence rates (including magnitude and fitness consequences) vary among species, populations and individuals (e.g. Jones et al. 2014; Jones et al. 2008; Nussey et al. 2013). Both survival and reproduction decrease with age in birds and mammals. Senescence can therefore have a negative impact on the vital rates that influence population growth and persistence. Management can play a role in regulating some of the effects of senescence in populations of conservation concern by mitigating some of the factors that play a role in mortality in wild populations. For example, via predator and disease control and the provision of food and shelter. There is also strong evidence that conservation management can have a strong impact on senescence dynamics, with captive populations of threatened species having significantly different senescence profiles than their wild counterparts (Lemaître et al. 2013). Despite this, it is only now that the impact of senescence on populations of conservation concern is being explored. A comparative study by Robert et al. (2015) has shown that senescence can negatively impact the dynamics of threatened wild mammal populations and increase the risk of extinction. However, empirical evidence on identity and mechanisms of factors that drive this variation in senescence patterns in threatened populations, and the role of conservation management in regulating this effect are still to emerge.
The proposed project aims to combine environmental, demographic, genetic and life-history data on the long-term reintroduction programme for the New Zealand hihi (Notiomystis cincta) to determine the factors that drive senescence patterns in this species and test, using the establishment history and variation in management strategies, the effects that conservation management has on senescence and its long-term repercussions on population viability. The project will involve field work in New Zealand, lab work in the UK and Bayesian modelling in Denmark.

Policy Impact:

The proposed project will help bridge the gap between evolutionary theory and conservation practice by providing insight into how to incorporate senescence patterns into the management programmes of threatened species to reduce the bias in extinction risk prediction.

Background Reading:
Actuarial senescence can increase the risk of extinction of mammal populations
Diversity of ageing across the tree of life
Comparing free-ranging and captive populations reveals intra-specific variation in aging rates in large herbivores

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To: Andrew Pomiankowski a.pomiankowski@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear Andrew,

Patricia Brekke submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 01/12/2016 at 5:55 pm, listing Francois Balloux as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Francois Balloux is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Ageing in the wild and how to manage it (Ref: 12945)

Theme: Evolution & Adaptation
Supervisory Team: Patricia Brekke (, IOZ), Francois Balloux (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Patricia Brekke patricia.brekke@ioz.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Patricia,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 05/06/2024.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Patricia Brekke patricia.brekke@ioz.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Patricia,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “Ageing in the wild and how to manage it” has not been updated since 30/06/2021. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 05/06/2024, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Patricia Brekke patricia.brekke@ioz.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 12945) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Patricia,

Project (ref: 12945) “Ageing in the wild and how to manage it”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Eileen Cox E.Cox@nhm.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Eileen,

Paul Eggleton has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Functional diversity of termites across the tropics: linking pattern and process (Ref: 14467)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Paul Eggleton (Life Sciences Department, NHM), Seirian Sumner (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL)

Description:

Termites are the most important decomposer invertebrates, but the exact nature of their ecological impacts are poorly understood. This project will examine the functional diversity of termites across the tropics and relate that to large scale ecosystem processes. It will form part of a global termite diversity programme, working particularly in Africa and Australia, involving a network of more than a dozen institutions and a core team of some 20 researchers.

The project will collate, expand and analyse two datasets – (1) a well-established global diversity data set, consisting of standardised samples comprising >300 transects from across all parts of the tropics, and covering a range of management regimes, and (2) growing information about the effects of termites on decomposition, nutrient cycling and soil properties.

The student will explore the relationship between termite diversity and key ecosystem processes by: (a) backfilling field and experimental work where there are data gaps, particularly by connecting with ongoing projects in Africa and Australia; (b) geospatial and phylogeographic analysis of diversity data and (c) by the investigation of the relationship between the uncovered diversity patterns and ecosystem processes, specifically in a biogeographical context. We are just beginning to appreciate the global importance of termite-mediated ecological processes and so this will be a great opportunity to contribute to an active research area of considerable ecological importance.

Policy Impact:

Termites are vital for tropical ecosystems, but forest modification and biogeography strong affect their diversity.

This project will disentangle these two factors and relate them to changes in ecosystem processes, giving a vital perspective on the role of termites in ecosystems.

Background Reading:
WA Foster et al,. 2011. Establishing the evidence base for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem function in the oil palm landscapes of South East Asia. Phil Trans Roy Soc B: Biol Sci, 366: 3277-3291.
RG Davies et al. 2003. Evolution of termite functional diversity: analysis and synthesis of local ecological and regional influences on local species richness. J Biogeog 30: 847-877.
P. Eggleton & I Tayasu. 2001. Feeding groups, lifetypes and the global ecology of termites. Ecol Res, 16: 941-960.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To: Andrew Pomiankowski a.pomiankowski@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Andrew,

Paul Eggleton at NHM has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Seirian Sumner as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for NHM Life Sciences Department, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Seirian Sumner is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Functional diversity of termites across the tropics: linking pattern and process (Ref: 14467)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Paul Eggleton (Life Sciences Department, NHM), Seirian Sumner (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Eileen Cox E.Cox@nhm.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Eileen,

Paul Eggleton submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 03/02/2017 at 5:38 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Functional diversity of termites across the tropics: linking pattern and process (Ref: 14467)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Paul Eggleton (Life Sciences Department, NHM), Seirian Sumner (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL)

Description:

Termites are the most important decomposer invertebrates, but the exact nature of their ecological impacts are poorly understood. This project will examine the functional diversity of termites across the tropics and relate that to large scale ecosystem processes. It will form part of a global termite diversity programme, working particularly in Africa and Australia, involving a network of more than a dozen institutions and a core team of some 20 researchers.

The project will collate, expand and analyse two datasets – (1) a well-established global diversity data set, consisting of standardised samples comprising >300 transects from across all parts of the tropics, and covering a range of management regimes, and (2) growing information about the effects of termites on decomposition, nutrient cycling and soil properties.

The student will explore the relationship between termite diversity and key ecosystem processes by: (a) backfilling field and experimental work where there are data gaps, particularly by connecting with ongoing projects in Africa and Australia; (b) geospatial and phylogeographic analysis of diversity data and (c) by the investigation of the relationship between the uncovered diversity patterns and ecosystem processes, specifically in a biogeographical context. We are just beginning to appreciate the global importance of termite-mediated ecological processes and so this will be a great opportunity to contribute to an active research area of considerable ecological importance.

Policy Impact:

Termites are vital for tropical ecosystems, but forest modification and biogeography strong affect their diversity.

This project will disentangle these two factors and relate them to changes in ecosystem processes, giving a vital perspective on the role of termites in ecosystems.

Background Reading:
WA Foster et al,. 2011. Establishing the evidence base for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem function in the oil palm landscapes of South East Asia. Phil Trans Roy Soc B: Biol Sci, 366: 3277-3291.
RG Davies et al. 2003. Evolution of termite functional diversity: analysis and synthesis of local ecological and regional influences on local species richness. J Biogeog 30: 847-877.
P. Eggleton & I Tayasu. 2001. Feeding groups, lifetypes and the global ecology of termites. Ecol Res, 16: 941-960.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To: Andrew Pomiankowski a.pomiankowski@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear Andrew,

Paul Eggleton submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 03/02/2017 at 5:38 pm, listing Seirian Sumner as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Seirian Sumner is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Functional diversity of termites across the tropics: linking pattern and process (Ref: 14467)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Paul Eggleton (Life Sciences Department, NHM), Seirian Sumner (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Paul Eggleton p.eggleton@nhm.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Paul,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 05/06/2024.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Paul Eggleton p.eggleton@nhm.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Paul,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “Functional diversity of termites across the tropics: linking pattern and process” has not been updated since 30/06/2021. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 05/06/2024, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Paul Eggleton p.eggleton@nhm.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 14467) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Paul,

Project (ref: 14467) “Functional diversity of termites across the tropics: linking pattern and process”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Mark Trimmer m.trimmer@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Mark,

Yannick Wurm has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Big data evolutionary genomics of social insects. (Ref: 14476)

Theme: Evolution & Adaptation
Supervisory Team: Yannick Wurm (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL), Stephen Rossiter (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL)

Description:

We have two main lines of research.

Genetics of social behaviour. Social animals exhibit a broad range of behaviors, and some theoretical understanding exists of the tradeoffs between different forms of social organisation. However, we know little about the the genes and processes underpinning social organisation or how it evolves. The diversity of social behaviors across the 20,000 species of ants represents a unique opportunity to empirically understand the mechanisms and tradeoffs involved in social change. We use highly molecular approaches, including genomics and bioinformatics but also potentially behavioural or field work to address major questions about social evolution. We aim to generate exciting new insights into genes and processes underpinning a major social transition, with implications on understanding evolution of complex phenotypes.

Molecular diagnostics for pollinator health. Effective pollination is crucial for the stability of the ecosystem, and for crop productivity. Governments had approved what they thought were “safe” levels of pesticides. But in fact, the pesticides are generic neurotoxins: they reduce the learning abilities, dexterity, foraging ability and ultimately survival of pollinators who consume nectar or pollen. As a result, several commonly used pesticides have now been banned. However, the problem may just have been shifted: we lack a good way of understanding whether authorised pesticides are better.Thus there is an urgent need for approaches that are more powerful/sensitive. Building on the recent 50,000-fold drop in the cost of DNA sequence analysis, we are developing high-resolution molecular diagnostics approaches which are poised to fundamentally change for the better how research on pesticides is performed and the mechanisms through which such crop chemicals are evaluated.

Policy Impact:

Wild and managed bees provide pollination services essential for ecosystem stability and crop yields, while ants are among the world’s most highly invasive species.

Understanding social insects are affected by environmental challenges from pesticides to social upheaval is essential for understanding social evolution, and for reducing unintended effects of pesticides.

Background Reading:
Healthy pollinators: evaluating pesticides with molecular medicine approaches (2019) TREE
Recurring adaptive introgression of a supergene variant that determines social organization (2022) Nature Communications
Genomic architecture and evolutionary antagonism drive allelic expression bias in the social supergene of red fire ants (2020)

CASE Partner: Multiple possible (e.g., BWARS, Bumblebee conservation trust) (https://wurmlab.com)

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear ,

Yannick Wurm at QMUL has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Stephen Rossiter as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for QMUL School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Stephen Rossiter is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Big data evolutionary genomics of social insects. (Ref: 14476)

Theme: Evolution & Adaptation
Supervisory Team: Yannick Wurm (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL), Stephen Rossiter (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Mark Trimmer m.trimmer@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Mark,

Yannick Wurm submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 03/02/2017 at 6:11 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Big data evolutionary genomics of social insects. (Ref: 14476)

Theme: Evolution & Adaptation
Supervisory Team: Yannick Wurm (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL), Stephen Rossiter (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL)

Description:

We have two main lines of research.

Genetics of social behaviour. Social animals exhibit a broad range of behaviors, and some theoretical understanding exists of the tradeoffs between different forms of social organisation. However, we know little about the the genes and processes underpinning social organisation or how it evolves. The diversity of social behaviors across the 20,000 species of ants represents a unique opportunity to empirically understand the mechanisms and tradeoffs involved in social change. We use highly molecular approaches, including genomics and bioinformatics but also potentially behavioural or field work to address major questions about social evolution. We aim to generate exciting new insights into genes and processes underpinning a major social transition, with implications on understanding evolution of complex phenotypes.

Molecular diagnostics for pollinator health. Effective pollination is crucial for the stability of the ecosystem, and for crop productivity. Governments had approved what they thought were “safe” levels of pesticides. But in fact, the pesticides are generic neurotoxins: they reduce the learning abilities, dexterity, foraging ability and ultimately survival of pollinators who consume nectar or pollen. As a result, several commonly used pesticides have now been banned. However, the problem may just have been shifted: we lack a good way of understanding whether authorised pesticides are better.Thus there is an urgent need for approaches that are more powerful/sensitive. Building on the recent 50,000-fold drop in the cost of DNA sequence analysis, we are developing high-resolution molecular diagnostics approaches which are poised to fundamentally change for the better how research on pesticides is performed and the mechanisms through which such crop chemicals are evaluated.

Policy Impact:

Wild and managed bees provide pollination services essential for ecosystem stability and crop yields, while ants are among the world’s most highly invasive species.

Understanding social insects are affected by environmental challenges from pesticides to social upheaval is essential for understanding social evolution, and for reducing unintended effects of pesticides.

Background Reading:
Healthy pollinators: evaluating pesticides with molecular medicine approaches (2019) TREE
Recurring adaptive introgression of a supergene variant that determines social organization (2022) Nature Communications
Genomic architecture and evolutionary antagonism drive allelic expression bias in the social supergene of red fire ants (2020)

CASE Partner: Multiple possible (e.g., BWARS, Bumblebee conservation trust) (https://wurmlab.com)

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear ,

Yannick Wurm submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 03/02/2017 at 6:11 pm, listing Stephen Rossiter as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Stephen Rossiter is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Big data evolutionary genomics of social insects. (Ref: 14476)

Theme: Evolution & Adaptation
Supervisory Team: Yannick Wurm (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL), Stephen Rossiter (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Yannick Wurm y.wurm@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Yannick,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 10/09/2024.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Yannick Wurm y.wurm@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Yannick,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “Big data evolutionary genomics of social insects.” has not been updated since 11/09/2023. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 10/09/2024, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Yannick Wurm y.wurm@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 14476) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Yannick,

Project (ref: 14476) “Big data evolutionary genomics of social insects.”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Andrew Barry a.barry@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Andrew,

Jan Axmacher has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Nocturnal pollinators in agro-ecosystems (Ref: 15443)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Jan Axmacher (Geography, UCL), Carl Sayer (Geography, UCL)

Description:

In recent years, pollination has been increasingly recognised as a key ecosystem service, as for example exemplified by its status in the upcoming IPBES report. Nonetheless, past research in this field has focused almost exclusively on diurnal species like bees, bumblebees and hoverflies. Nocturnal pollinators like many species of nocturnal moths or some beetle species have in the meantime been widely overlooked, and their importance and effectiveness remains very poorly understood.

Your PhD will aim to address some of the prevailing knowledge gaps in investigating nocturnal pollinator assemblages in agro-ecosystems. The primary focus will be on selected fruit orchards located in East Anglia. Your research will comprise a combination of direct pollinator observations and filming of nocturnal pollinator flower visits, pollinator exclusion experiments with measurements of the resulting fruit and seed set, as well as light trapping of nocturnal pollinator assemblages with subsequent analysis of pollen loads.

Policy Impact:

The results will help farmers and policy-makers alike to appreciate the role of nocturnal pollinators, hopefully leading to enhancements in the protection and management of their assemblages.

Background Reading:
WALTON RE et al. (2020) Nocturnal pollinators strongly contribute to pollen transport of wild flowers in an agricultural landscape. Biology Letters 16, 20190877.
MACGREGOR CJ et al. (2015) Pollination by nocturnal Lepidoptera, and the effects of light pollution: a review. Ecological Entomology, 40: 187–198.
Walton R.E., Sayer, C.D., Bennion. H. & Axmacher, J.C. (2021) Open-canopy ponds benefit diurnal pollinator communities in an agricultural landscape: implications for farmland pond management – Insect Conservation and Diversity 14, 307-324.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear ,

Jan Axmacher at UCL has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Carl Sayer as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for UCL Geography, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Carl Sayer is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Nocturnal pollinators in agro-ecosystems (Ref: 15443)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Jan Axmacher (Geography, UCL), Carl Sayer (Geography, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Andrew Barry a.barry@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Andrew,

Jan Axmacher submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 29/05/2017 at 6:52 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Nocturnal pollinators in agro-ecosystems (Ref: 15443)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Jan Axmacher (Geography, UCL), Carl Sayer (Geography, UCL)

Description:

In recent years, pollination has been increasingly recognised as a key ecosystem service, as for example exemplified by its status in the upcoming IPBES report. Nonetheless, past research in this field has focused almost exclusively on diurnal species like bees, bumblebees and hoverflies. Nocturnal pollinators like many species of nocturnal moths or some beetle species have in the meantime been widely overlooked, and their importance and effectiveness remains very poorly understood.

Your PhD will aim to address some of the prevailing knowledge gaps in investigating nocturnal pollinator assemblages in agro-ecosystems. The primary focus will be on selected fruit orchards located in East Anglia. Your research will comprise a combination of direct pollinator observations and filming of nocturnal pollinator flower visits, pollinator exclusion experiments with measurements of the resulting fruit and seed set, as well as light trapping of nocturnal pollinator assemblages with subsequent analysis of pollen loads.

Policy Impact:

The results will help farmers and policy-makers alike to appreciate the role of nocturnal pollinators, hopefully leading to enhancements in the protection and management of their assemblages.

Background Reading:
WALTON RE et al. (2020) Nocturnal pollinators strongly contribute to pollen transport of wild flowers in an agricultural landscape. Biology Letters 16, 20190877.
MACGREGOR CJ et al. (2015) Pollination by nocturnal Lepidoptera, and the effects of light pollution: a review. Ecological Entomology, 40: 187–198.
Walton R.E., Sayer, C.D., Bennion. H. & Axmacher, J.C. (2021) Open-canopy ponds benefit diurnal pollinator communities in an agricultural landscape: implications for farmland pond management – Insect Conservation and Diversity 14, 307-324.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear ,

Jan Axmacher submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 29/05/2017 at 6:52 pm, listing Carl Sayer as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Carl Sayer is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Nocturnal pollinators in agro-ecosystems (Ref: 15443)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Jan Axmacher (Geography, UCL), Carl Sayer (Geography, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Jan Axmacher j.axmacher@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Jan,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 05/07/2024.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Jan Axmacher j.axmacher@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Jan,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “Nocturnal pollinators in agro-ecosystems” has not been updated since 07/06/2023. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 05/07/2024, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Jan Axmacher j.axmacher@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 15443) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Jan,

Project (ref: 15443) “Nocturnal pollinators in agro-ecosystems”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Andrew Pomiankowski a.pomiankowski@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Andrew,

Helen Chatterjee has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Predicting human impacts and environmental change on Southeast Asian biodiversity: past, present and future (Ref: 15447)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Helen Chatterjee (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL), Samuel Turvey (Biodiversity and Macroecology Theme, IOZ)

Description:

Eastern and southeast Asia represent one of the world’s most significant biodiversity hotspots, but the region’s fauna is heavily impacted by habitat loss and overharvesting, and is likely to be further affected by future climate change. Data from the region’s rich historical, archaeological and Quaternary fossil records also reveal past distributions of many mammal species under different environmental conditions and human impact regimes.

This PhD will collate past and present species distribution data for a range of highly threatened southeast Asian large mammals (including primates, carnivores, elephants and rhinos) and employ a series of techniques (e.g. species distribution modelling using Maxent and GARP, ensemble modelling, hindcasting) to identify species niche requirements for conservation, and understand how Asian mammals respond to different environmental pressures in both the past and the future.

Policy Impact:

The research will provide a nuanced understanding of ecological responses to environmental change, and will assess the usefulness of different data sources for conservation.

With a focus on threatened species, the results can be integrated into action plans and can test the value of species distribution modelling for conservation planning.

Background Reading:
Turvey, S.T., Bruun, K., Ortiz, A., Hansford, J., Hu, S., Ding, Y., Zhang, T. and Chatterjee, H.J. (2018). New genus of extinct Holocene gibbon associated with humans in Imperial China. Science. 360 (6395). DOI: 10.1126/science.aao4903
Li B et al. (2002) Extinction of snub-nosed monkeys in China during the past 400 years. International Journal of Primatology 23: 1227-1244
Sodhi NS et al. (2004) Southeast Asian biodiversity: an impending disaster. Trends in Ecology & Evolution 19: 654-660

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To: Chris Carbone Chris.Carbone@zsl.org
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Chris,

Helen Chatterjee at UCL has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Samuel Turvey as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for UCL Genetics, Evolution and Environment, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Samuel Turvey is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Predicting human impacts and environmental change on Southeast Asian biodiversity: past, present and future (Ref: 15447)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Helen Chatterjee (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL), Samuel Turvey (Biodiversity and Macroecology Theme, IOZ)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Andrew Pomiankowski a.pomiankowski@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Andrew,

Helen Chatterjee submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 29/05/2017 at 7:17 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Predicting human impacts and environmental change on Southeast Asian biodiversity: past, present and future (Ref: 15447)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Helen Chatterjee (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL), Samuel Turvey (Biodiversity and Macroecology Theme, IOZ)

Description:

Eastern and southeast Asia represent one of the world’s most significant biodiversity hotspots, but the region’s fauna is heavily impacted by habitat loss and overharvesting, and is likely to be further affected by future climate change. Data from the region’s rich historical, archaeological and Quaternary fossil records also reveal past distributions of many mammal species under different environmental conditions and human impact regimes.

This PhD will collate past and present species distribution data for a range of highly threatened southeast Asian large mammals (including primates, carnivores, elephants and rhinos) and employ a series of techniques (e.g. species distribution modelling using Maxent and GARP, ensemble modelling, hindcasting) to identify species niche requirements for conservation, and understand how Asian mammals respond to different environmental pressures in both the past and the future.

Policy Impact:

The research will provide a nuanced understanding of ecological responses to environmental change, and will assess the usefulness of different data sources for conservation.

With a focus on threatened species, the results can be integrated into action plans and can test the value of species distribution modelling for conservation planning.

Background Reading:
Turvey, S.T., Bruun, K., Ortiz, A., Hansford, J., Hu, S., Ding, Y., Zhang, T. and Chatterjee, H.J. (2018). New genus of extinct Holocene gibbon associated with humans in Imperial China. Science. 360 (6395). DOI: 10.1126/science.aao4903
Li B et al. (2002) Extinction of snub-nosed monkeys in China during the past 400 years. International Journal of Primatology 23: 1227-1244
Sodhi NS et al. (2004) Southeast Asian biodiversity: an impending disaster. Trends in Ecology & Evolution 19: 654-660

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To: Chris Carbone Chris.Carbone@zsl.org
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear Chris,

Helen Chatterjee submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 29/05/2017 at 7:17 pm, listing Samuel Turvey as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Samuel Turvey is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Predicting human impacts and environmental change on Southeast Asian biodiversity: past, present and future (Ref: 15447)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Helen Chatterjee (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL), Samuel Turvey (Biodiversity and Macroecology Theme, IOZ)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Helen Chatterjee h.chatterjee@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Helen,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 10/09/2024.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Helen Chatterjee h.chatterjee@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Helen,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “Predicting human impacts and environmental change on Southeast Asian biodiversity: past, present and future” has not been updated since 11/09/2023. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 10/09/2024, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Helen Chatterjee h.chatterjee@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 15447) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Helen,

Project (ref: 15447) “Predicting human impacts and environmental change on Southeast Asian biodiversity: past, present and future”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Danielle Schreve Danielle.Schreve@rhul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Danielle,

Mark Brown has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Evolutionary ecology of social insects and their parasites (Ref: 15448)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Mark Brown (School of Biological Sciences, RHUL)

Description:

Social insects – ants, bees, wasps, and termites – provide key ecosystem services (e.g., pollination, seed dispersal, soil turnover) to natural and anthropogenically-driven ecosystems. Consequently, understanding their biology is a key focus of ecologists and evolutionary biologists.

In addition, their unique social lifestyle makes them an excellent system in which to investigate host-parasite interactions. We focus on understanding the epidemiology, evolution of virulence, and resistance mechanisms of social-insect/parasite interactions, mainly in bees (bumblebees and honeybees) and ants.

We also work on understanding the basic biology of bumblebees and other social insects, which is still surprisingly unknown, despite decades of study. There are always ongoing and potential research projects available to PhD students, so for further information, please contact me.

Policy Impact:

Bees, ants, and wasps play central roles in natural and anthropogenically-driven ecosystems. Understanding their biology, and pressures on it from natural and emergent parasites, will enable us to manage wild populations for biodiversity and human health.

Background Reading:
Jones CM, Brown MJF (2014) Parasites and genetic diversity in an invasive bumble bee. Journal of Animal Ecology in press
Fürst M, McMahon D, Osborne JL, Paxton RJ, Brown MJF (2014) Disease associations between honeybees and bumblebees as a threat to wild pollinators. Nature 506:364-366
Meeus I*, Brown MJF*, de Graaf DC, Smagghe G (2011) Effects of invasive parasites on bumble bee declines. Conservation Biology, 25: 662-671 (*=co-1st author)

CASE Partner: ()

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear ,

Mark Brown at RHUL has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for RHUL School of Biological Sciences, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Evolutionary ecology of social insects and their parasites (Ref: 15448)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Mark Brown (School of Biological Sciences, RHUL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Danielle Schreve Danielle.Schreve@rhul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Danielle,

Mark Brown submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 29/05/2017 at 7:22 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Evolutionary ecology of social insects and their parasites (Ref: 15448)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Mark Brown (School of Biological Sciences, RHUL)

Description:

Social insects – ants, bees, wasps, and termites – provide key ecosystem services (e.g., pollination, seed dispersal, soil turnover) to natural and anthropogenically-driven ecosystems. Consequently, understanding their biology is a key focus of ecologists and evolutionary biologists.

In addition, their unique social lifestyle makes them an excellent system in which to investigate host-parasite interactions. We focus on understanding the epidemiology, evolution of virulence, and resistance mechanisms of social-insect/parasite interactions, mainly in bees (bumblebees and honeybees) and ants.

We also work on understanding the basic biology of bumblebees and other social insects, which is still surprisingly unknown, despite decades of study. There are always ongoing and potential research projects available to PhD students, so for further information, please contact me.

Policy Impact:

Bees, ants, and wasps play central roles in natural and anthropogenically-driven ecosystems. Understanding their biology, and pressures on it from natural and emergent parasites, will enable us to manage wild populations for biodiversity and human health.

Background Reading:
Jones CM, Brown MJF (2014) Parasites and genetic diversity in an invasive bumble bee. Journal of Animal Ecology in press
Fürst M, McMahon D, Osborne JL, Paxton RJ, Brown MJF (2014) Disease associations between honeybees and bumblebees as a threat to wild pollinators. Nature 506:364-366
Meeus I*, Brown MJF*, de Graaf DC, Smagghe G (2011) Effects of invasive parasites on bumble bee declines. Conservation Biology, 25: 662-671 (*=co-1st author)

CASE Partner: ()

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear ,

Mark Brown submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 29/05/2017 at 7:22 pm, listing as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Evolutionary ecology of social insects and their parasites (Ref: 15448)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Mark Brown (School of Biological Sciences, RHUL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Mark Brown Mark.Brown@rhul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Mark,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 28/02/2024.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Mark Brown Mark.Brown@rhul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Mark,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “Evolutionary ecology of social insects and their parasites” has not been updated since 28/02/2023. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 28/02/2024, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Mark Brown Mark.Brown@rhul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 15448) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Mark,

Project (ref: 15448) “Evolutionary ecology of social insects and their parasites”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Eileen Cox E.Cox@nhm.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Eileen,

Javier Cuadros has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Dynamics of Plio-Pleistocene environments in East Africa through the study of clay sediments (Ref: 15452)

Theme: Earth, Atmosphere & Ocean Processes
Supervisory Team: Javier Cuadros (Earth Sciences Department, NHM), Ignacio de la Torre (Archaeology, UCL)

Description:

Climatic change is an important factor affecting hominin colonization and development. The rhythm and duration of paleoenvironmental changes is recorded in lake sequences, which are essential to reconstruct the extent of climatic variability in Plio-Pleistocene continental settings.

The Olduvai Gorge (Tanzania) is a world-renown palaeoanthropological site related to hominin fossils, and where palaeoenvironmental studies are facilitated by the existence of a palaeolake. This project will study lacustrine and peri- lacustrine sediments to reconstruct landscapes and climate in Olduvai 1.7-1.5 million years ago.

The study will contribute to better understanding the ecological contexts around the lake where Homo habilis and Homo erectus lived, and the changes undergone by their communities. Clay minerals are exceptional recorders of environmental conditions and change, and a robust tool complementary to fossil and palynological investigation. Clay minerals and other environmental markers will be used to reproduce the environment dynamics of this important site for human development.

Policy Impact:

Environmental changes in Olduvai 1.7-1.5 million years ago are key to unravel the causes of the hominin community dynamics in this crucial location and period for human development.

Information will improve the accuracy of palaeoenvironmental investigation using clay minerals.

Background Reading:
Ashley, G.M., Driese, S.G., 2000. Paleopedology and paleohydrology of a volcaniclastic paleosol interval: Implications for Early Pleistocene stratigraphy and paleoclimate record, Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania. Journal of Sedimentary Research 70, 1065-1080.
Deocampo, D.M., Cuadros, J., Wing-Dudek, T., Olives, J., Amouric, M., 2009. Saline lake diagenesis as revealed by coupled mineralogy and geochemistry of multiple ultrafine clay phases: Pliocene Olduvai gorge, Tanzania. American Journal of Science 309, 834-868.
Torre, I.de la, Mora, R., 2014. The Transition to the Acheulean in East Africa: an Assessment of Paradigms and Evidence from Olduvai Gorge (Tanzania). Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory 21, 781–823.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To: Sue Hamilton s.hamilton@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Sue,

Javier Cuadros at NHM has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Ignacio de la Torre as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for NHM Earth Sciences Department, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Ignacio de la Torre is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Dynamics of Plio-Pleistocene environments in East Africa through the study of clay sediments (Ref: 15452)

Theme: Earth, Atmosphere & Ocean Processes
Supervisory Team: Javier Cuadros (Earth Sciences Department, NHM), Ignacio de la Torre (Archaeology, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Eileen Cox E.Cox@nhm.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Eileen,

Javier Cuadros submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 30/05/2017 at 7:27 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Dynamics of Plio-Pleistocene environments in East Africa through the study of clay sediments (Ref: 15452)

Theme: Earth, Atmosphere & Ocean Processes
Supervisory Team: Javier Cuadros (Earth Sciences Department, NHM), Ignacio de la Torre (Archaeology, UCL)

Description:

Climatic change is an important factor affecting hominin colonization and development. The rhythm and duration of paleoenvironmental changes is recorded in lake sequences, which are essential to reconstruct the extent of climatic variability in Plio-Pleistocene continental settings.

The Olduvai Gorge (Tanzania) is a world-renown palaeoanthropological site related to hominin fossils, and where palaeoenvironmental studies are facilitated by the existence of a palaeolake. This project will study lacustrine and peri- lacustrine sediments to reconstruct landscapes and climate in Olduvai 1.7-1.5 million years ago.

The study will contribute to better understanding the ecological contexts around the lake where Homo habilis and Homo erectus lived, and the changes undergone by their communities. Clay minerals are exceptional recorders of environmental conditions and change, and a robust tool complementary to fossil and palynological investigation. Clay minerals and other environmental markers will be used to reproduce the environment dynamics of this important site for human development.

Policy Impact:

Environmental changes in Olduvai 1.7-1.5 million years ago are key to unravel the causes of the hominin community dynamics in this crucial location and period for human development.

Information will improve the accuracy of palaeoenvironmental investigation using clay minerals.

Background Reading:
Ashley, G.M., Driese, S.G., 2000. Paleopedology and paleohydrology of a volcaniclastic paleosol interval: Implications for Early Pleistocene stratigraphy and paleoclimate record, Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania. Journal of Sedimentary Research 70, 1065-1080.
Deocampo, D.M., Cuadros, J., Wing-Dudek, T., Olives, J., Amouric, M., 2009. Saline lake diagenesis as revealed by coupled mineralogy and geochemistry of multiple ultrafine clay phases: Pliocene Olduvai gorge, Tanzania. American Journal of Science 309, 834-868.
Torre, I.de la, Mora, R., 2014. The Transition to the Acheulean in East Africa: an Assessment of Paradigms and Evidence from Olduvai Gorge (Tanzania). Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory 21, 781–823.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To: Sue Hamilton s.hamilton@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear Sue,

Javier Cuadros submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 30/05/2017 at 7:27 pm, listing Ignacio de la Torre as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Ignacio de la Torre is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Dynamics of Plio-Pleistocene environments in East Africa through the study of clay sediments (Ref: 15452)

Theme: Earth, Atmosphere & Ocean Processes
Supervisory Team: Javier Cuadros (Earth Sciences Department, NHM), Ignacio de la Torre (Archaeology, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Javier Cuadros j.cuadros@nhm.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Javier,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 24/09/2024.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Javier Cuadros j.cuadros@nhm.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Javier,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “Dynamics of Plio-Pleistocene environments in East Africa through the study of clay sediments” has not been updated since 25/09/2023. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 24/09/2024, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Javier Cuadros j.cuadros@nhm.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 15452) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Javier,

Project (ref: 15452) “Dynamics of Plio-Pleistocene environments in East Africa through the study of clay sediments”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Andrew Pomiankowski a.pomiankowski@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Andrew,

Christophe Dessimoz has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Resolving Deep Animal Phylogenies Through Genome-wide Maximum Likelihood Phylogenetic Inference (Ref: 15454)

Theme: Evolution & Adaptation
Supervisory Team: Christophe Dessimoz (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL), Max Telford (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL)

Description:

Reconstructing accurate phylogenies is a major pursuit in biology, yet despite the progress made in our understanding of deep metazoan phylogeny, important questions remain. These typically involve interesting cases of rapid radiation or of rapid divergence—two drivers of biodiversity change and biological innovation.

State-of-the-art species trees are inferred from concatenated, “carefully” selected marker gene. This is wasteful at two levels. First, most genes are simply not considered. Second, even for those that are, by “averaging” their sequence through concatenation, we stand to overlook interesting instances of rapid evolution having occurred in individual genes and branches.

This interdisciplinary project involves experimental and computational biology. In the experimental part, we will collect fresh material from members of animal taxa having undergone apparent rapid radiation (e.g. Lophotrochozoan phyla) or divergence (e.g. Chaetognatha, Ctenophora, Xenacoelomorpha). We will extract RNA and use NGS to produce transcriptomes. In the computational part, we will implement a novel tree inference method that relaxes the assumption of identical branch length across all genes and infers species trees based on branching order, not branch lengths.

Policy Impact:

The sequencing revolution is generating a wealth of molecular data, yet progress at the methodological level lags behind. The new method proposed here will improve our ability to characterise and understand rapid radiation and rapid divergence.

Furthermore, the project could reveal the basis of aspects of evolutionary innovation important to the establishment of complex species.

Background Reading:
Telford MJ, Copley RR (2011) Improving animal phylogenies with genomic data. Trends Genet 27: 186–195.
Philippe, H., Brinkmann, H., Copley, R,R,, Moroz, L,, Nakano, H, Poustka, A,J,, Wallberg, A,, Peterson, K.J., and Telford, M.J. Acoelomorph flatworms are deuterostomes related to Xenoturbella Nature. 470:255-258.
Altenhoff AM, Schneider A, Gonnet GH, Dessimoz C (2011) OMA 2011: orthology inference among 1000 complete genomes. Nucl Acids Res 39: D289–D294.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear ,

Christophe Dessimoz at UCL has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Max Telford as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for UCL Genetics, Evolution and Environment, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Max Telford is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Resolving Deep Animal Phylogenies Through Genome-wide Maximum Likelihood Phylogenetic Inference (Ref: 15454)

Theme: Evolution & Adaptation
Supervisory Team: Christophe Dessimoz (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL), Max Telford (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Andrew Pomiankowski a.pomiankowski@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Andrew,

Christophe Dessimoz submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 30/05/2017 at 7:45 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Resolving Deep Animal Phylogenies Through Genome-wide Maximum Likelihood Phylogenetic Inference (Ref: 15454)

Theme: Evolution & Adaptation
Supervisory Team: Christophe Dessimoz (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL), Max Telford (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL)

Description:

Reconstructing accurate phylogenies is a major pursuit in biology, yet despite the progress made in our understanding of deep metazoan phylogeny, important questions remain. These typically involve interesting cases of rapid radiation or of rapid divergence—two drivers of biodiversity change and biological innovation.

State-of-the-art species trees are inferred from concatenated, “carefully” selected marker gene. This is wasteful at two levels. First, most genes are simply not considered. Second, even for those that are, by “averaging” their sequence through concatenation, we stand to overlook interesting instances of rapid evolution having occurred in individual genes and branches.

This interdisciplinary project involves experimental and computational biology. In the experimental part, we will collect fresh material from members of animal taxa having undergone apparent rapid radiation (e.g. Lophotrochozoan phyla) or divergence (e.g. Chaetognatha, Ctenophora, Xenacoelomorpha). We will extract RNA and use NGS to produce transcriptomes. In the computational part, we will implement a novel tree inference method that relaxes the assumption of identical branch length across all genes and infers species trees based on branching order, not branch lengths.

Policy Impact:

The sequencing revolution is generating a wealth of molecular data, yet progress at the methodological level lags behind. The new method proposed here will improve our ability to characterise and understand rapid radiation and rapid divergence.

Furthermore, the project could reveal the basis of aspects of evolutionary innovation important to the establishment of complex species.

Background Reading:
Telford MJ, Copley RR (2011) Improving animal phylogenies with genomic data. Trends Genet 27: 186–195.
Philippe, H., Brinkmann, H., Copley, R,R,, Moroz, L,, Nakano, H, Poustka, A,J,, Wallberg, A,, Peterson, K.J., and Telford, M.J. Acoelomorph flatworms are deuterostomes related to Xenoturbella Nature. 470:255-258.
Altenhoff AM, Schneider A, Gonnet GH, Dessimoz C (2011) OMA 2011: orthology inference among 1000 complete genomes. Nucl Acids Res 39: D289–D294.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear ,

Christophe Dessimoz submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 30/05/2017 at 7:45 pm, listing Max Telford as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Max Telford is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Resolving Deep Animal Phylogenies Through Genome-wide Maximum Likelihood Phylogenetic Inference (Ref: 15454)

Theme: Evolution & Adaptation
Supervisory Team: Christophe Dessimoz (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL), Max Telford (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Christophe Dessimoz c.dessimoz@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Christophe,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 24/09/2024.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Christophe Dessimoz c.dessimoz@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Christophe,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “Resolving Deep Animal Phylogenies Through Genome-wide Maximum Likelihood Phylogenetic Inference” has not been updated since 25/09/2023. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 24/09/2024, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Christophe Dessimoz c.dessimoz@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 15454) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Christophe,

Project (ref: 15454) “Resolving Deep Animal Phylogenies Through Genome-wide Maximum Likelihood Phylogenetic Inference”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Mark Trimmer m.trimmer@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Mark,

Devis Di Tommaso has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Fundamental Studies of Mineral Carbonation with Application to CO2 Sequestration (Ref: 15455)

Theme: Earth, Atmosphere & Ocean Processes
Supervisory Team: Devis Di Tommaso (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL)

Description:

The Challenge: CO2 sequestration via aqueous formation of magnesite (MgCO3) is a promising carbon capture, utilization and storage technology, albeit limited by slow precipitation rates. Encouragingly, MgCO3 naturally crystallizes at near surface conditions; this process is, however, irreproducible in lab settings, thus industrially unprofitable (due to requisite high T and pCO2).
Proposed Solution: The synergy between computation (atomistic simulations & geochemical modelling) and experiment (neutron scattering, X-ray diffraction, spectroscopy & imaging) will reveal the molecular events driving MgCO3 crystallization at ambient pressure and low temperatures.
Outcomes include detailing mechanisms of magnesite nucleation, as well as resolving the role of solution composition and surface nanotopography on crystallization kinetics; this will Impact CO2 mineralization by identifying the conditions facilitating magnesite formation.

Policy Impact:

Our project will represent the most evolved synergetic computational & experimental study worldwide tracking molecular events surrounding the formation of MgCO3 from solution (explicit resolution of solute/solvent separation, aggregation and interaction at the solid-solution interface). The aim is the discovery of conditions facilitating direct nucleation of anhydrous MgCO3 from ambient solution environments.

Background Reading:
M. Wolthers, D. Di Tommaso, Z. Du and N. H. de Leeuw, “Variations in calcite growth kinetics with surface topography: Molecular dynamics simulations and process-based growth kinetics modelling”, CrystEngComm, 2013, 15, 5506-5514
D. Di Tommaso and N. H. de Leeuw, “Structure and dynamics of the hydrated magnesium ion and of the solvated magnesium carbonates: insights from first principles simulations”, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2010, 12, 894-901
G. D. Saldi, G. Jordan, J. Schott and E. H. Oelkers, “Magnesite growth rates as a function of temperature and saturation state”, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 2009, 73, 5646

CASE Partner: Cambridge Carbon Capture (http://www.cacaca.co.uk/)

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear ,

Devis Di Tommaso at QMUL has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for QMUL School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Fundamental Studies of Mineral Carbonation with Application to CO2 Sequestration (Ref: 15455)

Theme: Earth, Atmosphere & Ocean Processes
Supervisory Team: Devis Di Tommaso (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Mark Trimmer m.trimmer@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Mark,

Devis Di Tommaso submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 30/05/2017 at 7:52 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Fundamental Studies of Mineral Carbonation with Application to CO2 Sequestration (Ref: 15455)

Theme: Earth, Atmosphere & Ocean Processes
Supervisory Team: Devis Di Tommaso (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL)

Description:

The Challenge: CO2 sequestration via aqueous formation of magnesite (MgCO3) is a promising carbon capture, utilization and storage technology, albeit limited by slow precipitation rates. Encouragingly, MgCO3 naturally crystallizes at near surface conditions; this process is, however, irreproducible in lab settings, thus industrially unprofitable (due to requisite high T and pCO2).
Proposed Solution: The synergy between computation (atomistic simulations & geochemical modelling) and experiment (neutron scattering, X-ray diffraction, spectroscopy & imaging) will reveal the molecular events driving MgCO3 crystallization at ambient pressure and low temperatures.
Outcomes include detailing mechanisms of magnesite nucleation, as well as resolving the role of solution composition and surface nanotopography on crystallization kinetics; this will Impact CO2 mineralization by identifying the conditions facilitating magnesite formation.

Policy Impact:

Our project will represent the most evolved synergetic computational & experimental study worldwide tracking molecular events surrounding the formation of MgCO3 from solution (explicit resolution of solute/solvent separation, aggregation and interaction at the solid-solution interface). The aim is the discovery of conditions facilitating direct nucleation of anhydrous MgCO3 from ambient solution environments.

Background Reading:
M. Wolthers, D. Di Tommaso, Z. Du and N. H. de Leeuw, “Variations in calcite growth kinetics with surface topography: Molecular dynamics simulations and process-based growth kinetics modelling”, CrystEngComm, 2013, 15, 5506-5514
D. Di Tommaso and N. H. de Leeuw, “Structure and dynamics of the hydrated magnesium ion and of the solvated magnesium carbonates: insights from first principles simulations”, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2010, 12, 894-901
G. D. Saldi, G. Jordan, J. Schott and E. H. Oelkers, “Magnesite growth rates as a function of temperature and saturation state”, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 2009, 73, 5646

CASE Partner: Cambridge Carbon Capture (http://www.cacaca.co.uk/)

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear ,

Devis Di Tommaso submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 30/05/2017 at 7:52 pm, listing as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Fundamental Studies of Mineral Carbonation with Application to CO2 Sequestration (Ref: 15455)

Theme: Earth, Atmosphere & Ocean Processes
Supervisory Team: Devis Di Tommaso (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Devis Di Tommaso d.ditommaso@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Devis,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 05/06/2024.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Devis Di Tommaso d.ditommaso@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Devis,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “Fundamental Studies of Mineral Carbonation with Application to CO2 Sequestration” has not been updated since 30/06/2021. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 05/06/2024, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Devis Di Tommaso d.ditommaso@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 15455) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Devis,

Project (ref: 15455) “Fundamental Studies of Mineral Carbonation with Application to CO2 Sequestration”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Andy Carter a.carter@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Andy,

Hilary Downes has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Evolution of explosive magmatic systems on oceanic islands: example of Brava (Cape Verdes) (Ref: 15457)

Theme: Natural & Biological Hazards
Supervisory Team: Hilary Downes (Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, BBK), Simon Day (Other, UCL)

Description:

The occurrence of explosive volcanic eruptions on intraplate oceanic islands is generally underestimated. On Brava, an intraplate oceanic island in Cape Verdes, recent field investigations showed a previously unrecognised caldera structure 7 x 5 km in diameter, filled with products of pyroclastic surges and flows of unknown age.

The mechanism which causes a volcano to erupt so explosively is not well understood, but one possibility is that magma interacts with groundwater. A study of the volcanic products of pre-and post-caldera eruptions on Brava will add important constraints to models of the hazards associated with their rare but devastating eruptions. The volcanology and structure of Brava is poorly known, but the caldera ring-fault and caldera-filling pyroclastic rocks are clearly exposed.

The PhD student would make detailed stratigraphic logs of sections on the island, and collect samples of pre- and post-caldera lavas and pyroclastic rocks. Brava’s pyroclastic rocks are mainly phonolitic and include the products of phreatic and phreatomagmatic surges, block and ash flows, and lithic-rich ignimbrites.

The samples would be analysed for variations in glass composition and mineral assemblages by electron microprobe, to reconstruct magma reservoir processes that led to the explosive eruptions. Whole-rock analyses by XRF will show whether there were any significant changes in magma compositions before and after caldera formation. Ar-Ar dating will also be undertaken.

Policy Impact:

A greater understanding of rare but devastating caldera-forming eruptions on oceanic islands; local and regional hazards associated with such eruptions; implications for other poorly studied oceanic intraplate islands; new paradigm about interaction of differentiated magma with groundwater.

Background Reading:
Tarff R W andf Day S J 2013. Chilled margin fragmentation as a trigger for transition from Strombolian to phreatomagmatic explosive activity at Cova de Paul Crater, Santo Antao, Cape Verde Islands. Bull. Volcanology, vol 75.
Faria B and Fonseca J 2013 Investigating volcanic hazard in Cape Verde Islands through geophysical monitoring: network description and first results. Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss., Vol 1, pp 4997–5032
Brown R J and Branney M J 2003. Event-stratigraphy of a caldera-forming ignimbrite eruption on Tenerife: the 273 ka Poris Formation. Bull. Volcanology. vol 66, p 392.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear ,

Hilary Downes at BBK has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Simon Day as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for BBK Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Simon Day is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Evolution of explosive magmatic systems on oceanic islands: example of Brava (Cape Verdes) (Ref: 15457)

Theme: Natural & Biological Hazards
Supervisory Team: Hilary Downes (Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, BBK), Simon Day (Other, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Andy Carter a.carter@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Andy,

Hilary Downes submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 30/05/2017 at 8:05 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Evolution of explosive magmatic systems on oceanic islands: example of Brava (Cape Verdes) (Ref: 15457)

Theme: Natural & Biological Hazards
Supervisory Team: Hilary Downes (Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, BBK), Simon Day (Other, UCL)

Description:

The occurrence of explosive volcanic eruptions on intraplate oceanic islands is generally underestimated. On Brava, an intraplate oceanic island in Cape Verdes, recent field investigations showed a previously unrecognised caldera structure 7 x 5 km in diameter, filled with products of pyroclastic surges and flows of unknown age.

The mechanism which causes a volcano to erupt so explosively is not well understood, but one possibility is that magma interacts with groundwater. A study of the volcanic products of pre-and post-caldera eruptions on Brava will add important constraints to models of the hazards associated with their rare but devastating eruptions. The volcanology and structure of Brava is poorly known, but the caldera ring-fault and caldera-filling pyroclastic rocks are clearly exposed.

The PhD student would make detailed stratigraphic logs of sections on the island, and collect samples of pre- and post-caldera lavas and pyroclastic rocks. Brava’s pyroclastic rocks are mainly phonolitic and include the products of phreatic and phreatomagmatic surges, block and ash flows, and lithic-rich ignimbrites.

The samples would be analysed for variations in glass composition and mineral assemblages by electron microprobe, to reconstruct magma reservoir processes that led to the explosive eruptions. Whole-rock analyses by XRF will show whether there were any significant changes in magma compositions before and after caldera formation. Ar-Ar dating will also be undertaken.

Policy Impact:

A greater understanding of rare but devastating caldera-forming eruptions on oceanic islands; local and regional hazards associated with such eruptions; implications for other poorly studied oceanic intraplate islands; new paradigm about interaction of differentiated magma with groundwater.

Background Reading:
Tarff R W andf Day S J 2013. Chilled margin fragmentation as a trigger for transition from Strombolian to phreatomagmatic explosive activity at Cova de Paul Crater, Santo Antao, Cape Verde Islands. Bull. Volcanology, vol 75.
Faria B and Fonseca J 2013 Investigating volcanic hazard in Cape Verde Islands through geophysical monitoring: network description and first results. Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss., Vol 1, pp 4997–5032
Brown R J and Branney M J 2003. Event-stratigraphy of a caldera-forming ignimbrite eruption on Tenerife: the 273 ka Poris Formation. Bull. Volcanology. vol 66, p 392.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear ,

Hilary Downes submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 30/05/2017 at 8:05 pm, listing Simon Day as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Simon Day is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Evolution of explosive magmatic systems on oceanic islands: example of Brava (Cape Verdes) (Ref: 15457)

Theme: Natural & Biological Hazards
Supervisory Team: Hilary Downes (Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, BBK), Simon Day (Other, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Hilary Downes h.downes@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Hilary,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 04/06/2020.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Hilary Downes h.downes@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Hilary,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “Evolution of explosive magmatic systems on oceanic islands: example of Brava (Cape Verdes)” has not been updated since 30/05/2017. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 04/06/2020, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Hilary Downes h.downes@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 15457) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Hilary,

Project (ref: 15457) “Evolution of explosive magmatic systems on oceanic islands: example of Brava (Cape Verdes)”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Eileen Cox E.Cox@nhm.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Eileen,

Bill Dubbin has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Solubility of toxic element-bearing jarosite nanoparticles in soil and sediment (Ref: 15458)

Theme: Environmental Hazards & Pollution
Supervisory Team: Bill Dubbin (Earth Sciences Department, NHM)

Description:

Mining activities often produce acidic liquid wastes known as ‘acid rock or acid mine drainage’ (ARD/AMD). These ARD/AMD waters contain large amounts of dissolved, potentially toxic elements (PTE) such as arsenic and lead which threaten the quality of river water, associated sediments and nearby soils, with implications for agricultural productivity and ecosystem health.

Nano-sized (< 100 nm diameter) jarosite minerals can form in these environments and take up the PTE, but when transported to other sites they may subsequently break down, releasing PTE. Nanoparticulate jarosites are likely be to more reactive than coarser-grained jarosites, but no data exist to confirm this hypothesis.

Therefore, this study will address two questions: (i) Are jarosite nanoparticles more soluble than bulk jarosites, and, if so, at what size do they display a “nano-effect’?’, and (ii) Are the rates of nanoparticulate jarosite dissolution the same as for bulk jarosites?

Policy Impact:

This cross-disciplinary research will inform the fields of environmental science, nanogeoscience, planetary science, soil science, geochemistry and mineralogy through greater understanding of jarosite solubility and the geochemical cycling of PTE.

Background Reading:
Forray, F.L., Smith, A.M.L., Navrotsky, A., Wright, K., Hudson-Edwards, K.A., Dubbin, W.E. 2013. Synthesis, Characterization and Thermochemistry of Synthetic Pb-As, Pb-Cu and Pb-Zn Jarosites, Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gca.2013.10.043
Smeaton, C.M., Walshe, G.E., Smith, A.M.L., Hudson-Edwards, K.A., Dubbin, W.E., Wright, K., Beale, A.M., Fryer, B.J. & Weisener, C.G. 2012. Simultaneous release of Fe and As during the reductive dissolution of Pb-As jarosite by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32. Environmental Science and Technology 46(23): 12823-12831
Kossoff, D., Hudson-Edwards, K.A., Dubbin, W.E., Alfredsson, M.A. & Geraki, T. 2012. Cycling of As, P, Pb and Sb during weathering of mine tailings: Implications for fluvial environments. Mineralogical Magazine 76(5): 1209-1228

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear ,

Bill Dubbin at NHM has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for NHM Earth Sciences Department, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Solubility of toxic element-bearing jarosite nanoparticles in soil and sediment (Ref: 15458)

Theme: Environmental Hazards & Pollution
Supervisory Team: Bill Dubbin (Earth Sciences Department, NHM)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Eileen Cox E.Cox@nhm.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Eileen,

Bill Dubbin submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 30/05/2017 at 8:11 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Solubility of toxic element-bearing jarosite nanoparticles in soil and sediment (Ref: 15458)

Theme: Environmental Hazards & Pollution
Supervisory Team: Bill Dubbin (Earth Sciences Department, NHM)

Description:

Mining activities often produce acidic liquid wastes known as ‘acid rock or acid mine drainage’ (ARD/AMD). These ARD/AMD waters contain large amounts of dissolved, potentially toxic elements (PTE) such as arsenic and lead which threaten the quality of river water, associated sediments and nearby soils, with implications for agricultural productivity and ecosystem health.

Nano-sized (< 100 nm diameter) jarosite minerals can form in these environments and take up the PTE, but when transported to other sites they may subsequently break down, releasing PTE. Nanoparticulate jarosites are likely be to more reactive than coarser-grained jarosites, but no data exist to confirm this hypothesis.

Therefore, this study will address two questions: (i) Are jarosite nanoparticles more soluble than bulk jarosites, and, if so, at what size do they display a “nano-effect’?’, and (ii) Are the rates of nanoparticulate jarosite dissolution the same as for bulk jarosites?

Policy Impact:

This cross-disciplinary research will inform the fields of environmental science, nanogeoscience, planetary science, soil science, geochemistry and mineralogy through greater understanding of jarosite solubility and the geochemical cycling of PTE.

Background Reading:
Forray, F.L., Smith, A.M.L., Navrotsky, A., Wright, K., Hudson-Edwards, K.A., Dubbin, W.E. 2013. Synthesis, Characterization and Thermochemistry of Synthetic Pb-As, Pb-Cu and Pb-Zn Jarosites, Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gca.2013.10.043
Smeaton, C.M., Walshe, G.E., Smith, A.M.L., Hudson-Edwards, K.A., Dubbin, W.E., Wright, K., Beale, A.M., Fryer, B.J. & Weisener, C.G. 2012. Simultaneous release of Fe and As during the reductive dissolution of Pb-As jarosite by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32. Environmental Science and Technology 46(23): 12823-12831
Kossoff, D., Hudson-Edwards, K.A., Dubbin, W.E., Alfredsson, M.A. & Geraki, T. 2012. Cycling of As, P, Pb and Sb during weathering of mine tailings: Implications for fluvial environments. Mineralogical Magazine 76(5): 1209-1228

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear ,

Bill Dubbin submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 30/05/2017 at 8:11 pm, listing as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Solubility of toxic element-bearing jarosite nanoparticles in soil and sediment (Ref: 15458)

Theme: Environmental Hazards & Pollution
Supervisory Team: Bill Dubbin (Earth Sciences Department, NHM)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Bill Dubbin b.dubbin@nhm.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Bill,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 04/06/2020.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Bill Dubbin b.dubbin@nhm.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Bill,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “Solubility of toxic element-bearing jarosite nanoparticles in soil and sediment” has not been updated since 30/05/2017. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 04/06/2020, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Bill Dubbin b.dubbin@nhm.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 15458) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Bill,

Project (ref: 15458) “Solubility of toxic element-bearing jarosite nanoparticles in soil and sediment”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Danielle Schreve Danielle.Schreve@rhul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Danielle,

Vincent Jansen has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

The effects of stress on functioning and dynamics of bee colonies (Ref: 15473)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Vincent Jansen (School of Biological Sciences, RHUL), Mark Brown (School of Biological Sciences, RHUL)

Description:

Natural pollinator populations are declining globally. However, the cause of these declines remains unresolved, with many potential candidates being proposed. In previous work we have shown how mild stress put on individual bees can cause colonies to fail. Stress reduces colony function, presumably through impacts on cooperative behaviour within the colony (through foraging, thermoregulation etc.), leading to colony failure.

This project allows you to investigate how colonies respond to stress and how this affects fitness for a range of stress levels and different sources of stress (disease, pesticides etc).

The project provides the opportunity to use both empirical work, using colonies of bumblebees, and theoretical work, through building models of colony dynamics. The experimental component can be used to parametrise and validate the mathematical models. Results will elucidate colony declines, and inform management strategies to mitigate them.

Policy Impact:

This research will contribute to the formulation and implementation of policy decisions to mitigate pollinator decline, and the effects of bee diseases, landscape and pesticide use on pollinator decline.

Background Reading:
Chronic sublethal stress causes bee colony failure. Bryden, J., Gill, R., Mitton, R. A. A., Raine, N. E. & Jansen, V. A. A. (2013) Ecology Letters. 16, 12, p. 1463-1469
Threats to an ecosystem Threats to an ecosystem service: pressures on pollinators Vanbergen, A., Brown, M. J. F. , Bryden, J. , Jansen, V. A. A. , & 35 others (2013) Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment. 11, p. 251–259

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear ,

Vincent Jansen at RHUL has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Mark Brown as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for RHUL School of Biological Sciences, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Mark Brown is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

The effects of stress on functioning and dynamics of bee colonies (Ref: 15473)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Vincent Jansen (School of Biological Sciences, RHUL), Mark Brown (School of Biological Sciences, RHUL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Danielle Schreve Danielle.Schreve@rhul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Danielle,

Vincent Jansen submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 09/06/2017 at 4:43 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

The effects of stress on functioning and dynamics of bee colonies (Ref: 15473)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Vincent Jansen (School of Biological Sciences, RHUL), Mark Brown (School of Biological Sciences, RHUL)

Description:

Natural pollinator populations are declining globally. However, the cause of these declines remains unresolved, with many potential candidates being proposed. In previous work we have shown how mild stress put on individual bees can cause colonies to fail. Stress reduces colony function, presumably through impacts on cooperative behaviour within the colony (through foraging, thermoregulation etc.), leading to colony failure.

This project allows you to investigate how colonies respond to stress and how this affects fitness for a range of stress levels and different sources of stress (disease, pesticides etc).

The project provides the opportunity to use both empirical work, using colonies of bumblebees, and theoretical work, through building models of colony dynamics. The experimental component can be used to parametrise and validate the mathematical models. Results will elucidate colony declines, and inform management strategies to mitigate them.

Policy Impact:

This research will contribute to the formulation and implementation of policy decisions to mitigate pollinator decline, and the effects of bee diseases, landscape and pesticide use on pollinator decline.

Background Reading:
Chronic sublethal stress causes bee colony failure. Bryden, J., Gill, R., Mitton, R. A. A., Raine, N. E. & Jansen, V. A. A. (2013) Ecology Letters. 16, 12, p. 1463-1469
Threats to an ecosystem Threats to an ecosystem service: pressures on pollinators Vanbergen, A., Brown, M. J. F. , Bryden, J. , Jansen, V. A. A. , & 35 others (2013) Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment. 11, p. 251–259

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear ,

Vincent Jansen submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 09/06/2017 at 4:43 pm, listing Mark Brown as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Mark Brown is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

The effects of stress on functioning and dynamics of bee colonies (Ref: 15473)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Vincent Jansen (School of Biological Sciences, RHUL), Mark Brown (School of Biological Sciences, RHUL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Vincent Jansen Vincent.Jansen@rhul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Vincent,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 02/10/2024.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Vincent Jansen Vincent.Jansen@rhul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Vincent,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “The effects of stress on functioning and dynamics of bee colonies” has not been updated since 03/10/2023. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 02/10/2024, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Vincent Jansen Vincent.Jansen@rhul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 15473) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Vincent,

Project (ref: 15473) “The effects of stress on functioning and dynamics of bee colonies”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Robb McDonald n.r.mcdonald@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Robb,

Edward Johnson has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Transient loading of structures under impact of finite-amplitude waves (Ref: 15476)

Theme: Natural & Biological Hazards
Supervisory Team: Edward Johnson (Mathematics, UCL), Ian Eames (Other, UCL)

Description:

The tremendous devastation caused by flood waves, storm surges and tsunamis can to a great extent be ascribed to the large volume of moving water associated with the waves. The waves are long and of finite amplitude.

This project will use modern theoretical analysis of weakly nonlinear equations and numerical integration of time-dependent finite amplitude equations to discuss these phenomena and relate them to experimental observations. Particular attention will be paid to evaluating and predicting the large transient forces exerted on structures during wave impact, where the effects of super-long waves does not seem to have been fully discussed.

The project will take advantage of the large-scale tsunami experiments to be carried as part of the 1.9M Euro ERC-funded Urban Waves project under Prof. Tiziana Rossetto, Department of Civil Engineering at UCL, who will accommodate specific tsunami experiments required to validate the theoretical work proposed.

Policy Impact:

Exposure to coastal floods across the world is forecast to be 150 million people and £20 trillion in assets by 2070.

This research will provide guidance on forces on coastal structures precisely when there is worldwide development of building standards for extreme wave impacts (Stilwell 2009).

Background Reading:
JOHNSON, E. R., Vilenski, G. G. (2005). Two-dimensional leaps in near-critical flow over isolated orography. Proceedings of the Royal Society A, 461 (2064), 3747-3763.
ROSSETTO, T., Allsop, W., Charvet, I., Robinson, D. I. (2011). Physical modelling of tsunami using a new pneumatic wave generator. Coastal Engineering 58(6), 517-527.
Charvet, I., EAMES, I., ROSSETTO, T. (2013). New tsunami runup relationships based on long wave experiments. Ocean Modelling. 69, pp.79-92.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To: Kevin Fowler k.fowler@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Kevin,

Edward Johnson at UCL has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Ian Eames as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for UCL Mathematics, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Ian Eames is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Transient loading of structures under impact of finite-amplitude waves (Ref: 15476)

Theme: Natural & Biological Hazards
Supervisory Team: Edward Johnson (Mathematics, UCL), Ian Eames (Other, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Robb McDonald n.r.mcdonald@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Robb,

Edward Johnson submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 09/06/2017 at 5:00 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Transient loading of structures under impact of finite-amplitude waves (Ref: 15476)

Theme: Natural & Biological Hazards
Supervisory Team: Edward Johnson (Mathematics, UCL), Ian Eames (Other, UCL)

Description:

The tremendous devastation caused by flood waves, storm surges and tsunamis can to a great extent be ascribed to the large volume of moving water associated with the waves. The waves are long and of finite amplitude.

This project will use modern theoretical analysis of weakly nonlinear equations and numerical integration of time-dependent finite amplitude equations to discuss these phenomena and relate them to experimental observations. Particular attention will be paid to evaluating and predicting the large transient forces exerted on structures during wave impact, where the effects of super-long waves does not seem to have been fully discussed.

The project will take advantage of the large-scale tsunami experiments to be carried as part of the 1.9M Euro ERC-funded Urban Waves project under Prof. Tiziana Rossetto, Department of Civil Engineering at UCL, who will accommodate specific tsunami experiments required to validate the theoretical work proposed.

Policy Impact:

Exposure to coastal floods across the world is forecast to be 150 million people and £20 trillion in assets by 2070.

This research will provide guidance on forces on coastal structures precisely when there is worldwide development of building standards for extreme wave impacts (Stilwell 2009).

Background Reading:
JOHNSON, E. R., Vilenski, G. G. (2005). Two-dimensional leaps in near-critical flow over isolated orography. Proceedings of the Royal Society A, 461 (2064), 3747-3763.
ROSSETTO, T., Allsop, W., Charvet, I., Robinson, D. I. (2011). Physical modelling of tsunami using a new pneumatic wave generator. Coastal Engineering 58(6), 517-527.
Charvet, I., EAMES, I., ROSSETTO, T. (2013). New tsunami runup relationships based on long wave experiments. Ocean Modelling. 69, pp.79-92.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To: Kevin Fowler k.fowler@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear Kevin,

Edward Johnson submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 09/06/2017 at 5:00 pm, listing Ian Eames as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Ian Eames is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Transient loading of structures under impact of finite-amplitude waves (Ref: 15476)

Theme: Natural & Biological Hazards
Supervisory Team: Edward Johnson (Mathematics, UCL), Ian Eames (Other, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Edward Johnson e.johnson@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Edward,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 10/09/2024.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Edward Johnson e.johnson@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Edward,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “Transient loading of structures under impact of finite-amplitude waves” has not been updated since 11/09/2023. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 10/09/2024, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Edward Johnson e.johnson@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 15476) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Edward,

Project (ref: 15476) “Transient loading of structures under impact of finite-amplitude waves”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Michel Tsamados m.tsamados@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Michel,

Ilan Kelman has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Climate change impacts on tropical atoll communities (Ref: 15485)

Theme: Natural & Biological Hazards
Supervisory Team: Ilan Kelman (Earth Sciences, UCL)

Description:

Some residents of tropical atoll communities are considering migration due to climate change’s impacts. Many more might think about it in the future. Yet limited empirical evidence exists to (i) demonstrate the geomorphological responses of low-lying islands to changing oceans and (ii) garner local knowledge about experiences of multiple changes, e.g. due to tectonic subsidence or uplift.
To seek evidence of recent relative and absolute sea-level and other ocean and coastal changes, this project will conduct qualitative interviews for local knowledge and quantitative analyses of coastline and elevation changes through existing remote sensed data and on-site surveying in locations with geodetic benchmarks.
Locations that could yield adequate qualitative and quantitative data will be selected. Possible attributions of observed changes will be made to local or wider environmental factors and will indicate whether the changes are cyclic or a changing baseline.

Policy Impact:

The research results will be communicated to the people involved through local traditional methods, as instructed by community members, and to island governments through policy seminars and policy briefs.

Background Reading:
Kelman, I., S. Ayeb-Karlsson, K. Rose-Clarke, A. Prost, E. Ronneberg, N. Wheeler, and N. Watts. 2021. “A review of mental health and wellbeing under climate change in small island developing states (SIDS)”. Environmental Research Letters, vol. 16, article 033007.
Kelman, I. 2018. “Islandness within climate change narratives of small island developing states (SIDS)”. Island Studies Journal, vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 149-166.
Kelman, I. 2015. “Difficult decisions: Migration from Small Island Developing States under climate change”. Earth’s Future, vol. 3, no. 4, pp. 133-142

CASE Partner: ()

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear ,

Ilan Kelman at UCL has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for UCL Earth Sciences, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Climate change impacts on tropical atoll communities (Ref: 15485)

Theme: Natural & Biological Hazards
Supervisory Team: Ilan Kelman (Earth Sciences, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Michel Tsamados m.tsamados@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Michel,

Ilan Kelman submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 09/06/2017 at 5:45 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Climate change impacts on tropical atoll communities (Ref: 15485)

Theme: Natural & Biological Hazards
Supervisory Team: Ilan Kelman (Earth Sciences, UCL)

Description:

Some residents of tropical atoll communities are considering migration due to climate change’s impacts. Many more might think about it in the future. Yet limited empirical evidence exists to (i) demonstrate the geomorphological responses of low-lying islands to changing oceans and (ii) garner local knowledge about experiences of multiple changes, e.g. due to tectonic subsidence or uplift.
To seek evidence of recent relative and absolute sea-level and other ocean and coastal changes, this project will conduct qualitative interviews for local knowledge and quantitative analyses of coastline and elevation changes through existing remote sensed data and on-site surveying in locations with geodetic benchmarks.
Locations that could yield adequate qualitative and quantitative data will be selected. Possible attributions of observed changes will be made to local or wider environmental factors and will indicate whether the changes are cyclic or a changing baseline.

Policy Impact:

The research results will be communicated to the people involved through local traditional methods, as instructed by community members, and to island governments through policy seminars and policy briefs.

Background Reading:
Kelman, I., S. Ayeb-Karlsson, K. Rose-Clarke, A. Prost, E. Ronneberg, N. Wheeler, and N. Watts. 2021. “A review of mental health and wellbeing under climate change in small island developing states (SIDS)”. Environmental Research Letters, vol. 16, article 033007.
Kelman, I. 2018. “Islandness within climate change narratives of small island developing states (SIDS)”. Island Studies Journal, vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 149-166.
Kelman, I. 2015. “Difficult decisions: Migration from Small Island Developing States under climate change”. Earth’s Future, vol. 3, no. 4, pp. 133-142

CASE Partner: ()

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear ,

Ilan Kelman submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 09/06/2017 at 5:45 pm, listing as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Climate change impacts on tropical atoll communities (Ref: 15485)

Theme: Natural & Biological Hazards
Supervisory Team: Ilan Kelman (Earth Sciences, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Ilan Kelman i.kelman@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Ilan,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 11/07/2023.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Ilan Kelman i.kelman@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Ilan,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “Climate change impacts on tropical atoll communities” has not been updated since 07/11/2022. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 11/07/2023, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Ilan Kelman i.kelman@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 15485) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Ilan,

Project (ref: 15485) “Climate change impacts on tropical atoll communities”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Michel Tsamados m.tsamados@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Michel,

Carolina Lithgow-Bertelloni has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

The structure of the lithosphere and the state of stress of the Earth (Ref: 15494)

Theme: Solid Earth Dynamics
Supervisory Team: Carolina Lithgow-Bertelloni (Earth Sciences, UCL), Lars Stixrude (Earth Sciences, UCL)

Description:

An understanding of the tectonic stress field at all scales is geologically important because it is the agent of crustal deformation, our primary record of Earth history and controls surface deformation at a variety of length scales. Regionally, stresses within and between plates control many geological processes ranging from back-arc and sedimentary basin formation to mountain building.

A complete self-consistent physical model of tectonic stress at all scales is a a difficult task, because it spans many length-scales and time-scales. Important missing information includes a global model of density and rheological structure for the lithosphere. For this project the student will focus on assembling data relating to thickness. thermal state, composition and rheology of the lithosphere by tectonic province to improve on an existing model of lithospheric structure (Naliboff et al., 2012) which accounts for variations in thickness, thermal profile and chemistry for cratons, platforms, active and passive margins and oceanic basins.

The lithospheric structure assembled and its physical properties will be computed with a self-consistent thermodynamic model and compared to a variety of petrological, seismic and gravity data. The resulting structure will be used to compute the effects on the lithospheric stress field (Earth’s deformation) using state-of-the-art finite element techniques.

Policy Impact:

The state of stress determines the ability of the crust to deform, which is critical for understanding past Earth’s history, including that related to resource formation.

Background Reading:
C. Lithgow-Bertelloni and J. Guynn, Origin of the lithospheric stress field, J. Geophys. Res., 109, B01408, 2004.
J. B. Naliboff, C. Lithgow-Bertelloni, L. J. Ruff, and N. de Koker (2012) The effects of lithospheric thickness and density structure on Earth’s stress field, Geophysical Journal International, 188, 1-17, DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-246X.2011.05248.x

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear ,

Carolina Lithgow-Bertelloni at UCL has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Lars Stixrude as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for UCL Earth Sciences, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Lars Stixrude is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

The structure of the lithosphere and the state of stress of the Earth (Ref: 15494)

Theme: Solid Earth Dynamics
Supervisory Team: Carolina Lithgow-Bertelloni (Earth Sciences, UCL), Lars Stixrude (Earth Sciences, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Michel Tsamados m.tsamados@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Michel,

Carolina Lithgow-Bertelloni submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 09/06/2017 at 7:39 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

The structure of the lithosphere and the state of stress of the Earth (Ref: 15494)

Theme: Solid Earth Dynamics
Supervisory Team: Carolina Lithgow-Bertelloni (Earth Sciences, UCL), Lars Stixrude (Earth Sciences, UCL)

Description:

An understanding of the tectonic stress field at all scales is geologically important because it is the agent of crustal deformation, our primary record of Earth history and controls surface deformation at a variety of length scales. Regionally, stresses within and between plates control many geological processes ranging from back-arc and sedimentary basin formation to mountain building.

A complete self-consistent physical model of tectonic stress at all scales is a a difficult task, because it spans many length-scales and time-scales. Important missing information includes a global model of density and rheological structure for the lithosphere. For this project the student will focus on assembling data relating to thickness. thermal state, composition and rheology of the lithosphere by tectonic province to improve on an existing model of lithospheric structure (Naliboff et al., 2012) which accounts for variations in thickness, thermal profile and chemistry for cratons, platforms, active and passive margins and oceanic basins.

The lithospheric structure assembled and its physical properties will be computed with a self-consistent thermodynamic model and compared to a variety of petrological, seismic and gravity data. The resulting structure will be used to compute the effects on the lithospheric stress field (Earth’s deformation) using state-of-the-art finite element techniques.

Policy Impact:

The state of stress determines the ability of the crust to deform, which is critical for understanding past Earth’s history, including that related to resource formation.

Background Reading:
C. Lithgow-Bertelloni and J. Guynn, Origin of the lithospheric stress field, J. Geophys. Res., 109, B01408, 2004.
J. B. Naliboff, C. Lithgow-Bertelloni, L. J. Ruff, and N. de Koker (2012) The effects of lithospheric thickness and density structure on Earth’s stress field, Geophysical Journal International, 188, 1-17, DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-246X.2011.05248.x

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear ,

Carolina Lithgow-Bertelloni submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 09/06/2017 at 7:39 pm, listing Lars Stixrude as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Lars Stixrude is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

The structure of the lithosphere and the state of stress of the Earth (Ref: 15494)

Theme: Solid Earth Dynamics
Supervisory Team: Carolina Lithgow-Bertelloni (Earth Sciences, UCL), Lars Stixrude (Earth Sciences, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Carolina Lithgow-Bertelloni c.lithgow-bertelloni@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Carolina,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 06/09/2018.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Carolina Lithgow-Bertelloni c.lithgow-bertelloni@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Carolina,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “The structure of the lithosphere and the state of stress of the Earth” has not been updated since 09/06/2017. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 06/09/2018, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Carolina Lithgow-Bertelloni c.lithgow-bertelloni@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 15494) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Carolina,

Project (ref: 15494) “The structure of the lithosphere and the state of stress of the Earth”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Michel Tsamados m.tsamados@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Michel,

Lidunka Vocadlo has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

The structure, dynamics and composition of the Earth’s core (Ref: 15508)

Theme: Solid Earth Dynamics
Supervisory Team: Lidunka Vocadlo (Earth Sciences, UCL), Ian Wood (Earth Sciences, UCL)

Description:

A fundamental requirement of modelling the Earth’s core is that results from computer simulations and experimental studies of material properties should match the available seismic data. Yet results from many experiments and simulations show that there is a mismatch between mineral physics data and the seismological observations.

If we are to understand the dynamics and evolution of the Earth as a whole, we must be able to determine accurately the properties of core phases under extreme pressure/temperature conditions. In this PhD project, the student will determine the physical properties of core-forming phases with a view to better understanding the structure, dynamics and evolution of the Earth’s core.

Policy Impact:

A better understanding of the evolution of our planet

Background Reading:
Martorell et al. 2013 Strong Premelting Effect in the Elastic Properties of hcp-Fe Under Inner-Core Conditions. Science 342. 466-468
Vočadlo et al. 2003 The properties of iron under core conditions from first principles calculations. Phys. Earth Planet. Int., 140, 101-125.
Vočadlo 2007 Ab initio calculations of the elasticity of iron and iron alloys at inner core conditions: evidence for a partially molten inner core? Earth Plan. Sci. Lett., 254, 227-232.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear ,

Lidunka Vocadlo at UCL has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Ian Wood as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for UCL Earth Sciences, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Ian Wood is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

The structure, dynamics and composition of the Earth’s core (Ref: 15508)

Theme: Solid Earth Dynamics
Supervisory Team: Lidunka Vocadlo (Earth Sciences, UCL), Ian Wood (Earth Sciences, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Michel Tsamados m.tsamados@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Michel,

Lidunka Vocadlo submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 16/06/2017 at 4:05 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

The structure, dynamics and composition of the Earth’s core (Ref: 15508)

Theme: Solid Earth Dynamics
Supervisory Team: Lidunka Vocadlo (Earth Sciences, UCL), Ian Wood (Earth Sciences, UCL)

Description:

A fundamental requirement of modelling the Earth’s core is that results from computer simulations and experimental studies of material properties should match the available seismic data. Yet results from many experiments and simulations show that there is a mismatch between mineral physics data and the seismological observations.

If we are to understand the dynamics and evolution of the Earth as a whole, we must be able to determine accurately the properties of core phases under extreme pressure/temperature conditions. In this PhD project, the student will determine the physical properties of core-forming phases with a view to better understanding the structure, dynamics and evolution of the Earth’s core.

Policy Impact:

A better understanding of the evolution of our planet

Background Reading:
Martorell et al. 2013 Strong Premelting Effect in the Elastic Properties of hcp-Fe Under Inner-Core Conditions. Science 342. 466-468
Vočadlo et al. 2003 The properties of iron under core conditions from first principles calculations. Phys. Earth Planet. Int., 140, 101-125.
Vočadlo 2007 Ab initio calculations of the elasticity of iron and iron alloys at inner core conditions: evidence for a partially molten inner core? Earth Plan. Sci. Lett., 254, 227-232.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear ,

Lidunka Vocadlo submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 16/06/2017 at 4:05 pm, listing Ian Wood as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Ian Wood is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

The structure, dynamics and composition of the Earth’s core (Ref: 15508)

Theme: Solid Earth Dynamics
Supervisory Team: Lidunka Vocadlo (Earth Sciences, UCL), Ian Wood (Earth Sciences, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Lidunka Vocadlo l.vocadlo@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Lidunka,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 10/09/2024.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Lidunka Vocadlo l.vocadlo@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Lidunka,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “The structure, dynamics and composition of the Earth’s core” has not been updated since 11/09/2023. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 10/09/2024, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Lidunka Vocadlo l.vocadlo@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 15508) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Lidunka,

Project (ref: 15508) “The structure, dynamics and composition of the Earth’s core”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Danielle Schreve Danielle.Schreve@rhul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Danielle,

Paola Vannucchi has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

The interaction of volcanism with a TTF triple junction: the case of Volcan Baru’ and the subducting Panama Fracture Zone (Ref: 15511)

Theme: Solid Earth Dynamics
Supervisory Team: Paola Vannucchi (Department of Earth Sciences, RHUL), Chiara Petrone (Earth Sciences Department, NHM)

Description:

Miocene to present plate tectonic reconstructions of the southern Middle America Trench (MAT) and adjacent volcanic arc reveal the south-eastward migration of the Nazca–Cocos–Caribbean triple junction along the MAT. Volcán Barú is a dormant stratovolcano which lies above the subducting Panama Fracture Zone (PFZ) separating the Cocos and Nazca plates.

This project aims to:

1) better understand the chemical composition of Volcán Barú at different stages of activity with the ultimate aim to find chemical signatures which may give insight into the timing of the arrival of the PFZ beneath the Central America Volcanic Arc;

2) determine whether the PFZ was a transform fault or fracture zone when it subducted (i.e. if a spreading center was subducting to the north of the PFZ prior to arrival at the trench).

This project will integrate field observations, ocean drilling data, geochemical and petrological analysis of Volcán Barú samples with 3D tectonic reconstructions.

Policy Impact:

Subduction zones are significant volcanic and seismic hazards.

The potential impact of subducting plate characteristics on upper plate processes has important benefits for both science and society.

Background Reading:
MacMillan, I; Gans, PB; Alvarado, G, 2004. Middle Miocene to present plate tectonic history of the southern Central American Volcanic Arc. TECTONOPHYSICS, 392, pp. 325-348 DOI: 10.1016/j.tecto.2004.04.014
Morell, K. D.; Fisher, D. M.; Gardner, T. W., 2008. Inner forearc response to subduction of the Panama Fracture Zone, southern Central America. EARTH AND PLANETARY SCIENCE LETTERS, 265, pp. 82-95 DOI: 10.1016/j.epsl.2007.09.039
Hidalgo, P. J.; Rooney, T. O., 2010. Crystal fractionation processes at Baru volcano from the deep to shallow crust. GEOCHEMISTRY GEOPHYSICS GEOSYSTEMS, 11, Q12S30 DOI: 10.1029/2010GC003262

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To: Eileen Cox E.Cox@nhm.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Eileen,

Paola Vannucchi at RHUL has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Chiara Petrone as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for RHUL Department of Earth Sciences, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Chiara Petrone is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

The interaction of volcanism with a TTF triple junction: the case of Volcan Baru’ and the subducting Panama Fracture Zone (Ref: 15511)

Theme: Solid Earth Dynamics
Supervisory Team: Paola Vannucchi (Department of Earth Sciences, RHUL), Chiara Petrone (Earth Sciences Department, NHM)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Danielle Schreve Danielle.Schreve@rhul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Danielle,

Paola Vannucchi submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 16/06/2017 at 4:31 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

The interaction of volcanism with a TTF triple junction: the case of Volcan Baru’ and the subducting Panama Fracture Zone (Ref: 15511)

Theme: Solid Earth Dynamics
Supervisory Team: Paola Vannucchi (Department of Earth Sciences, RHUL), Chiara Petrone (Earth Sciences Department, NHM)

Description:

Miocene to present plate tectonic reconstructions of the southern Middle America Trench (MAT) and adjacent volcanic arc reveal the south-eastward migration of the Nazca–Cocos–Caribbean triple junction along the MAT. Volcán Barú is a dormant stratovolcano which lies above the subducting Panama Fracture Zone (PFZ) separating the Cocos and Nazca plates.

This project aims to:

1) better understand the chemical composition of Volcán Barú at different stages of activity with the ultimate aim to find chemical signatures which may give insight into the timing of the arrival of the PFZ beneath the Central America Volcanic Arc;

2) determine whether the PFZ was a transform fault or fracture zone when it subducted (i.e. if a spreading center was subducting to the north of the PFZ prior to arrival at the trench).

This project will integrate field observations, ocean drilling data, geochemical and petrological analysis of Volcán Barú samples with 3D tectonic reconstructions.

Policy Impact:

Subduction zones are significant volcanic and seismic hazards.

The potential impact of subducting plate characteristics on upper plate processes has important benefits for both science and society.

Background Reading:
MacMillan, I; Gans, PB; Alvarado, G, 2004. Middle Miocene to present plate tectonic history of the southern Central American Volcanic Arc. TECTONOPHYSICS, 392, pp. 325-348 DOI: 10.1016/j.tecto.2004.04.014
Morell, K. D.; Fisher, D. M.; Gardner, T. W., 2008. Inner forearc response to subduction of the Panama Fracture Zone, southern Central America. EARTH AND PLANETARY SCIENCE LETTERS, 265, pp. 82-95 DOI: 10.1016/j.epsl.2007.09.039
Hidalgo, P. J.; Rooney, T. O., 2010. Crystal fractionation processes at Baru volcano from the deep to shallow crust. GEOCHEMISTRY GEOPHYSICS GEOSYSTEMS, 11, Q12S30 DOI: 10.1029/2010GC003262

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To: Eileen Cox E.Cox@nhm.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear Eileen,

Paola Vannucchi submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 16/06/2017 at 4:31 pm, listing Chiara Petrone as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Chiara Petrone is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

The interaction of volcanism with a TTF triple junction: the case of Volcan Baru’ and the subducting Panama Fracture Zone (Ref: 15511)

Theme: Solid Earth Dynamics
Supervisory Team: Paola Vannucchi (Department of Earth Sciences, RHUL), Chiara Petrone (Earth Sciences Department, NHM)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Paola Vannucchi paola.vannucchi@rhul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Paola,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 04/06/2019.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Paola Vannucchi paola.vannucchi@rhul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Paola,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “The interaction of volcanism with a TTF triple junction: the case of Volcan Baru’ and the subducting Panama Fracture Zone” has not been updated since 06/04/2018. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 04/06/2019, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Paola Vannucchi paola.vannucchi@rhul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 15511) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Paola,

Project (ref: 15511) “The interaction of volcanism with a TTF triple junction: the case of Volcan Baru’ and the subducting Panama Fracture Zone”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Andy Carter a.carter@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Andy,

Charlie Underwood has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Mineralisation in the chondrichthyan vertebral column: evolutionary patterns and functional diversity (Ref: 15512)

Theme: Evolution & Adaptation
Supervisory Team: Charlie Underwood (Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, BBK), Zerina Johanson (Earth Sciences Department, NHM)

Description:

Chondrichthyans (sharks, rays, chimera and relatives) represent some of the best known and yet most poorly understood vertebrates today. They have an evolutionary history dating from well over 425 million years ago, to the present.

They inhabited a range of environments, with a high diversity of body forms and dentitions. One part of chondrichthyan body that remains understudied is the vertebral column, which shows different degrees and patterns of mineralisation in different taxa. The vertebral column is a key element within vertebrates, providing overall support, as well as providing attachment points for body musculature and associated nerves and blood vessels.

The vertebral column provides strength, but also needs to be flexible for locomotion. The chondrichthyan skeleton is composed primarily of cartilage, with a layer of surface mineralization associated with most elements. In contrast, vertebral centra show a unique pattern of mineralization that differs from that of other parts of the skeleton.

The project proposes to study these patterns of mineralization in extant and fossil chondricthyans, linking these observations to other features such as habitat, body form and dentitions, to discover correlations between these and vertebral mineralisation patterns.

We will also examine correlations between these and major extinction events through geological history in order to discover whether some mineralization patterns represented more successful adaptations than others.

Policy Impact:

The vertebral column relates to important ecological and functional traits such as locomotion, and is a key unifying character of vertebrates. Knowledge of how and when this structure mineralises will aid understanding of the evolution of shark diversity, adaptation to major extinction events.

Background Reading:
PORTER, M.E, KOOB, T. J. and SUMMERS, A. P. 2007. The contribution of mineral to the material properties of vertebral cartilage from the smooth-hound shark Mustelus californicus. The Journal of Experimental Biology 210, 3319-3327.
DEAN, M. N. and SUMMERS, A. P. 2006. Mineralized Cartilage in the skeleton of chondrichthyan fishes. Zoology 109: 164–168.
JOHANSON, Z., TRINAJSTIC, K., CARR, R. A. and RITCHIE, A. 2013. Evolution and development of the synarcual in early vertebrates. Zoomorphology 132: 95-110.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To: Eileen Cox E.Cox@nhm.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Eileen,

Charlie Underwood at BBK has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Zerina Johanson as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for BBK Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Zerina Johanson is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Mineralisation in the chondrichthyan vertebral column: evolutionary patterns and functional diversity (Ref: 15512)

Theme: Evolution & Adaptation
Supervisory Team: Charlie Underwood (Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, BBK), Zerina Johanson (Earth Sciences Department, NHM)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Andy Carter a.carter@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Andy,

Charlie Underwood submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 16/06/2017 at 4:37 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Mineralisation in the chondrichthyan vertebral column: evolutionary patterns and functional diversity (Ref: 15512)

Theme: Evolution & Adaptation
Supervisory Team: Charlie Underwood (Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, BBK), Zerina Johanson (Earth Sciences Department, NHM)

Description:

Chondrichthyans (sharks, rays, chimera and relatives) represent some of the best known and yet most poorly understood vertebrates today. They have an evolutionary history dating from well over 425 million years ago, to the present.

They inhabited a range of environments, with a high diversity of body forms and dentitions. One part of chondrichthyan body that remains understudied is the vertebral column, which shows different degrees and patterns of mineralisation in different taxa. The vertebral column is a key element within vertebrates, providing overall support, as well as providing attachment points for body musculature and associated nerves and blood vessels.

The vertebral column provides strength, but also needs to be flexible for locomotion. The chondrichthyan skeleton is composed primarily of cartilage, with a layer of surface mineralization associated with most elements. In contrast, vertebral centra show a unique pattern of mineralization that differs from that of other parts of the skeleton.

The project proposes to study these patterns of mineralization in extant and fossil chondricthyans, linking these observations to other features such as habitat, body form and dentitions, to discover correlations between these and vertebral mineralisation patterns.

We will also examine correlations between these and major extinction events through geological history in order to discover whether some mineralization patterns represented more successful adaptations than others.

Policy Impact:

The vertebral column relates to important ecological and functional traits such as locomotion, and is a key unifying character of vertebrates. Knowledge of how and when this structure mineralises will aid understanding of the evolution of shark diversity, adaptation to major extinction events.

Background Reading:
PORTER, M.E, KOOB, T. J. and SUMMERS, A. P. 2007. The contribution of mineral to the material properties of vertebral cartilage from the smooth-hound shark Mustelus californicus. The Journal of Experimental Biology 210, 3319-3327.
DEAN, M. N. and SUMMERS, A. P. 2006. Mineralized Cartilage in the skeleton of chondrichthyan fishes. Zoology 109: 164–168.
JOHANSON, Z., TRINAJSTIC, K., CARR, R. A. and RITCHIE, A. 2013. Evolution and development of the synarcual in early vertebrates. Zoomorphology 132: 95-110.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To: Eileen Cox E.Cox@nhm.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear Eileen,

Charlie Underwood submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 16/06/2017 at 4:37 pm, listing Zerina Johanson as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Zerina Johanson is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Mineralisation in the chondrichthyan vertebral column: evolutionary patterns and functional diversity (Ref: 15512)

Theme: Evolution & Adaptation
Supervisory Team: Charlie Underwood (Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, BBK), Zerina Johanson (Earth Sciences Department, NHM)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Charlie Underwood c.underwood@bbk.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Charlie,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 27/09/2021.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Charlie Underwood c.underwood@bbk.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Charlie,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “Mineralisation in the chondrichthyan vertebral column: evolutionary patterns and functional diversity” has not been updated since 09/03/2022. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 27/09/2021, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Charlie Underwood c.underwood@bbk.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 15512) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Charlie,

Project (ref: 15512) “Mineralisation in the chondrichthyan vertebral column: evolutionary patterns and functional diversity”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Susan Jobling Susan.Jobling@brunel.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Susan,

Allan Tucker has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Extracting Predictive Knowledge from Free-Text Documents at Kew Gardens (Ref: 15514)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Allan Tucker (Institute of Environment, Health and Societies, Brunel), Don Kirkup Kirkup (Biodiversity Informatics and Spatial Analysis, KEW)

Description:

In the last two decades there has been a surge in data related to biodiversity of plants through, for example, on-line publications, DNA-sequences and images of specimens. Much of this data is semi-structured, temporal, spatial and noisy.

This PhD will focus on the use of textual data in floras, the traditional taxonomic research outputs from organisations such as Kew that deal with the nomenclature, geographical distribution, ecology and comparative morphology of the species of a region. The student will be trained in data-mining for ecology to develop a suite of tools for predictive ecology.

Text mining will be integrated with machine learning classifiers to identify common species, their traits and habitats in different ecoystems. For example, certain species may be commonly associated, but only when specific traits are evident and in particular types of geography (e.g. forest). These sorts of complex relationship will be automatically extracted from the historical texts.

Policy Impact:

This research will give new insights into plant species and ecology. Through Dr Kirkup’s links with international initiatives (where the tools will be incorporated), knowledge will be disseminated so that institutions around the UK and Europe will be able to exploit their data more fully.

Background Reading:
(2012) Tucker, A. and Duplisea, D., Bioinformatics tools in predictive ecology: Applications to fisheries, Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society: Part B 367 (1586) : 279- 290
(2011) J. Kattge et al., “TRY – A Global Plant Traits Database” Global Change Biology, 17, 9
(2008) Feinerer, I. Hornik, K. Meyer, D. Text Mining Infrastructure in R, Journal of Statistical Software, 25(5)

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To: Mark Chase M.Chase@kew.org
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Mark,

Allan Tucker at Brunel has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Don Kirkup Kirkup as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for Brunel Institute of Environment, Health and Societies, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Don Kirkup Kirkup is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Extracting Predictive Knowledge from Free-Text Documents at Kew Gardens (Ref: 15514)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Allan Tucker (Institute of Environment, Health and Societies, Brunel), Don Kirkup Kirkup (Biodiversity Informatics and Spatial Analysis, KEW)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Susan Jobling Susan.Jobling@brunel.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Susan,

Allan Tucker submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 16/06/2017 at 5:12 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Extracting Predictive Knowledge from Free-Text Documents at Kew Gardens (Ref: 15514)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Allan Tucker (Institute of Environment, Health and Societies, Brunel), Don Kirkup Kirkup (Biodiversity Informatics and Spatial Analysis, KEW)

Description:

In the last two decades there has been a surge in data related to biodiversity of plants through, for example, on-line publications, DNA-sequences and images of specimens. Much of this data is semi-structured, temporal, spatial and noisy.

This PhD will focus on the use of textual data in floras, the traditional taxonomic research outputs from organisations such as Kew that deal with the nomenclature, geographical distribution, ecology and comparative morphology of the species of a region. The student will be trained in data-mining for ecology to develop a suite of tools for predictive ecology.

Text mining will be integrated with machine learning classifiers to identify common species, their traits and habitats in different ecoystems. For example, certain species may be commonly associated, but only when specific traits are evident and in particular types of geography (e.g. forest). These sorts of complex relationship will be automatically extracted from the historical texts.

Policy Impact:

This research will give new insights into plant species and ecology. Through Dr Kirkup’s links with international initiatives (where the tools will be incorporated), knowledge will be disseminated so that institutions around the UK and Europe will be able to exploit their data more fully.

Background Reading:
(2012) Tucker, A. and Duplisea, D., Bioinformatics tools in predictive ecology: Applications to fisheries, Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society: Part B 367 (1586) : 279- 290
(2011) J. Kattge et al., “TRY – A Global Plant Traits Database” Global Change Biology, 17, 9
(2008) Feinerer, I. Hornik, K. Meyer, D. Text Mining Infrastructure in R, Journal of Statistical Software, 25(5)

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To: Mark Chase M.Chase@kew.org
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear Mark,

Allan Tucker submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 16/06/2017 at 5:12 pm, listing Don Kirkup Kirkup as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Don Kirkup Kirkup is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Extracting Predictive Knowledge from Free-Text Documents at Kew Gardens (Ref: 15514)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Allan Tucker (Institute of Environment, Health and Societies, Brunel), Don Kirkup Kirkup (Biodiversity Informatics and Spatial Analysis, KEW)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Allan Tucker allan.tucker@brunel.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Allan,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 06/04/2019.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Allan Tucker allan.tucker@brunel.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Allan,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “Extracting Predictive Knowledge from Free-Text Documents at Kew Gardens” has not been updated since 16/06/2017. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 06/04/2019, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Allan Tucker allan.tucker@brunel.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 15514) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Allan,

Project (ref: 15514) “Extracting Predictive Knowledge from Free-Text Documents at Kew Gardens”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Susan Jobling Susan.Jobling@brunel.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Susan,

Allan Tucker has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

A “Big Data” approach to severe storms in a changing climate (Ref: 15515)

Theme: Earth, Atmosphere & Ocean Processes
Supervisory Team: Allan Tucker (Institute of Environment, Health and Societies, Brunel), Andrew Russell (Other, Brunel)

Description:

Is there stormy weather ahead? A climate change driven increase in the frequency and/or intensity of severe storms could have costly impacts for our society. Yet climate models do not resolve key details about the atmosphere that would allow us to explicitly investigate how these small scale/high impact events might change in the future.

With this project, we will investigate a more statistical approach to understanding how the nature of severe storms may change in the future.We will use decades of global data from weather balloons, weather stations, satellites and observations from past meteorological field campaigns, combined with gridded global model products for the past and future, to develop a robust statistical picture of the conditions that lead to severe storms.

Using state-of-the-art data analysis and machine learning, this project will explore building predictive models by integrating data and testing on historical scenarios.

Policy Impact:

This research project will inform the insurance and re-insurance industries of the changing nature of the risk associated with severe storms.

Background Reading:
Tucker, A. and Duplisea, D. (2012) Bioinformatics tools in predictive ecology: Applications to fisheries, Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society: Part B, 367, 279-290.
Brooks, H. E. (2013) Severe thunderstorms and climate change. Atmos. Res., 123, 129-138.
Russell, A. (2012) Climate change and extreme event projections: what do we need for regional responses? Regions, 288, 14-15.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear ,

Allan Tucker at Brunel has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Andrew Russell as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for Brunel Institute of Environment, Health and Societies, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Andrew Russell is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

A “Big Data” approach to severe storms in a changing climate (Ref: 15515)

Theme: Earth, Atmosphere & Ocean Processes
Supervisory Team: Allan Tucker (Institute of Environment, Health and Societies, Brunel), Andrew Russell (Other, Brunel)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Susan Jobling Susan.Jobling@brunel.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Susan,

Allan Tucker submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 16/06/2017 at 5:18 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

A “Big Data” approach to severe storms in a changing climate (Ref: 15515)

Theme: Earth, Atmosphere & Ocean Processes
Supervisory Team: Allan Tucker (Institute of Environment, Health and Societies, Brunel), Andrew Russell (Other, Brunel)

Description:

Is there stormy weather ahead? A climate change driven increase in the frequency and/or intensity of severe storms could have costly impacts for our society. Yet climate models do not resolve key details about the atmosphere that would allow us to explicitly investigate how these small scale/high impact events might change in the future.

With this project, we will investigate a more statistical approach to understanding how the nature of severe storms may change in the future.We will use decades of global data from weather balloons, weather stations, satellites and observations from past meteorological field campaigns, combined with gridded global model products for the past and future, to develop a robust statistical picture of the conditions that lead to severe storms.

Using state-of-the-art data analysis and machine learning, this project will explore building predictive models by integrating data and testing on historical scenarios.

Policy Impact:

This research project will inform the insurance and re-insurance industries of the changing nature of the risk associated with severe storms.

Background Reading:
Tucker, A. and Duplisea, D. (2012) Bioinformatics tools in predictive ecology: Applications to fisheries, Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society: Part B, 367, 279-290.
Brooks, H. E. (2013) Severe thunderstorms and climate change. Atmos. Res., 123, 129-138.
Russell, A. (2012) Climate change and extreme event projections: what do we need for regional responses? Regions, 288, 14-15.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear ,

Allan Tucker submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 16/06/2017 at 5:18 pm, listing Andrew Russell as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Andrew Russell is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

A “Big Data” approach to severe storms in a changing climate (Ref: 15515)

Theme: Earth, Atmosphere & Ocean Processes
Supervisory Team: Allan Tucker (Institute of Environment, Health and Societies, Brunel), Andrew Russell (Other, Brunel)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Allan Tucker allan.tucker@brunel.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Allan,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 06/04/2019.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Allan Tucker allan.tucker@brunel.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Allan,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “A “Big Data” approach to severe storms in a changing climate” has not been updated since 16/06/2017. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 06/04/2019, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Allan Tucker allan.tucker@brunel.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 15515) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Allan,

Project (ref: 15515) “A “Big Data” approach to severe storms in a changing climate”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Martin Wooster martin.wooster@kcl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Martin,

Stephen Sturzenbaum has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Assessment of carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the nematode: an invertebrate model for a complex discipline (Ref: 15518)

Theme: Environmental Hazards & Pollution
Supervisory Team: Stephen Sturzenbaum (Division of Analytical, Environmental & Forensic Sciences, KCL), Volker Arlt (Division of Analytical, Environmental & Forensic Sciences, KCL)

Description:

The invertebrate model C. elegans will be utilized to assess the (geno)toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) extracted from contaminated environmental sources (air & soil). Wild-type and transgenic nematodes will be used to explore (in vivo) the time- and -dose resolved responses to a suit of PAHs.

Exposure will be further assessed by defining the frequency of stable pre-mutagenic DNA adducts and oxidative damage to DNA will be evaluated via the Comet assay. Whole genome chip technology will be applied to define the transcriptional fingerprint of PAH exposure and key responses validated by quantitative PCR (qPCR) and by RNA interference (RNAi).

These studies will define relationships between toxicological end-points and gene expression pattern (Toxicogenomics), predict toxic responses, and identify the underlying toxicity mechanisms.

Policy Impact:

Environmental pollutants such as PAHs can cause genetic damage and initiate cancer.

This project will provide a targeted hazard/risk assessment of complex PAH mixtures which is important for the management of contaminated PAH matrices

Background Reading:
Menzel, et al. (2009). Gene expression profiling to characterize sediment toxicity – a pilot study using C.elegans whole genome microarrays. BMC Genomics 10:160;
Aitlhadj, L., Stürzenbaum, S.R. (2013). The toxicological assessment of two anti-obesity drugs in C. elegans. Toxicol. Res. 2:145-50.
Imanikia, S., Galea, F., Nagy, E., Phillips, D.H., Stürzenbaum, S.R., Arlt, V.M. (2016). The application of the comet assay to assess the genotoxicity of environmental pollutants in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Environ Toxicol Pharmacol. 45:356-361.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear ,

Stephen Sturzenbaum at KCL has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Volker Arlt as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for KCL Division of Analytical, Environmental & Forensic Sciences, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Volker Arlt is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Assessment of carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the nematode: an invertebrate model for a complex discipline (Ref: 15518)

Theme: Environmental Hazards & Pollution
Supervisory Team: Stephen Sturzenbaum (Division of Analytical, Environmental & Forensic Sciences, KCL), Volker Arlt (Division of Analytical, Environmental & Forensic Sciences, KCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Martin Wooster martin.wooster@kcl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Martin,

Stephen Sturzenbaum submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 16/06/2017 at 5:36 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Assessment of carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the nematode: an invertebrate model for a complex discipline (Ref: 15518)

Theme: Environmental Hazards & Pollution
Supervisory Team: Stephen Sturzenbaum (Division of Analytical, Environmental & Forensic Sciences, KCL), Volker Arlt (Division of Analytical, Environmental & Forensic Sciences, KCL)

Description:

The invertebrate model C. elegans will be utilized to assess the (geno)toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) extracted from contaminated environmental sources (air & soil). Wild-type and transgenic nematodes will be used to explore (in vivo) the time- and -dose resolved responses to a suit of PAHs.

Exposure will be further assessed by defining the frequency of stable pre-mutagenic DNA adducts and oxidative damage to DNA will be evaluated via the Comet assay. Whole genome chip technology will be applied to define the transcriptional fingerprint of PAH exposure and key responses validated by quantitative PCR (qPCR) and by RNA interference (RNAi).

These studies will define relationships between toxicological end-points and gene expression pattern (Toxicogenomics), predict toxic responses, and identify the underlying toxicity mechanisms.

Policy Impact:

Environmental pollutants such as PAHs can cause genetic damage and initiate cancer.

This project will provide a targeted hazard/risk assessment of complex PAH mixtures which is important for the management of contaminated PAH matrices

Background Reading:
Menzel, et al. (2009). Gene expression profiling to characterize sediment toxicity – a pilot study using C.elegans whole genome microarrays. BMC Genomics 10:160;
Aitlhadj, L., Stürzenbaum, S.R. (2013). The toxicological assessment of two anti-obesity drugs in C. elegans. Toxicol. Res. 2:145-50.
Imanikia, S., Galea, F., Nagy, E., Phillips, D.H., Stürzenbaum, S.R., Arlt, V.M. (2016). The application of the comet assay to assess the genotoxicity of environmental pollutants in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Environ Toxicol Pharmacol. 45:356-361.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear ,

Stephen Sturzenbaum submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 16/06/2017 at 5:36 pm, listing Volker Arlt as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Volker Arlt is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Assessment of carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the nematode: an invertebrate model for a complex discipline (Ref: 15518)

Theme: Environmental Hazards & Pollution
Supervisory Team: Stephen Sturzenbaum (Division of Analytical, Environmental & Forensic Sciences, KCL), Volker Arlt (Division of Analytical, Environmental & Forensic Sciences, KCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Stephen Sturzenbaum stephen.sturzenbaum@kcl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Stephen,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 05/06/2024.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Stephen Sturzenbaum stephen.sturzenbaum@kcl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Stephen,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “Assessment of carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the nematode: an invertebrate model for a complex discipline” has not been updated since 30/06/2021. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 05/06/2024, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Stephen Sturzenbaum stephen.sturzenbaum@kcl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 15518) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Stephen,

Project (ref: 15518) “Assessment of carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the nematode: an invertebrate model for a complex discipline”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Kate Heppell c.m.heppell@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Kate,

Kate Spencer has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Microplastic sources and interactions from catchment to coast (Ref: 15519)

Theme: Environmental Hazards & Pollution
Supervisory Team: Kate Spencer (School of Geography, QMUL), Geraldene Wharton (School of Geography, QMUL)

Description:

The accelerating global release of microplastics (mP) into the aquatic environment seems inevitable, with long-term consequences for water quality and biodiversity. Managing plastics in the environment and ensuring effective intervention policies and practices requires an understanding of mP source, transport and fate. There has been a significant amount of research exploring the occurrence of mP in environmental media (e.g., water, sediment, soil) and examining uptake and impacts on aquatic organisms (Woodall et al., 2014; Ivar do Sul & Costa, 2014) particularly in marine environments. However, much less is known of their wider impact on ecosystem functioning.

This PhD will focus on the sources of mPs, how they interact with fine sediment and their fluxes from catchment to coast in association with carbon, microbiota and sediment. Particular areas of interest could include the fate of mP as they transition from fresh to saline water conditions (i.e. estuaries and deltas), the interactions between mP and fine sediment and impacts for sediment flux or release of degraded mPs from the UK’s > 1200 historic coastal landfills that are at risk from tidal storm surges, flooding, sea level rise and erosion (Brand et al. 2017; Brand and Spencer 2019).

This PhD is aligned with the EU Interreg IV project Preventing Plastic Pollution and could include Case Partners – Deltares or the Environment Agency.

Deltares are an independent research institute for applied water research specializing in coastal and delta systems. They provide fundamental science expertise in the fields of coastal systems, sediment transport modelling and coastal management and host state-of-the-art large-scale flume and wave basin facilities, and well-equipped sediment and soil laboratories for applied research and sample characterisation. They have an excellent track record in translating science into real-world management solutions, delivering high-impact science, and successfully managing major projects (including running very large EU-funded pure and applied science projects).

Policy Impact:

Improved understanding of how microplastics are transported from catchment to coast will have impacts for compliance with Water Framework Directive, whilst an understanding of how different types of plastic impact wide ecosystem functioning can inform the development of new intervention policies on plastic reduction.

Background Reading:
Horton et al. 2017 STOTEN 586: 127–141
Brand, J.H. and Spencer, K.L. (2019). Potential contamination of the coastal zone by eroding historic landfills. Marine Pollution Bulletin, 146: pp. 282–291
Brand, J.H., Spencer, K.L., O’Shea, F.T. and Lindsay, J.E. (2017). Potential pollution risks of historic landfills on low-lying coasts and estuaries. Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Water, wat2.1264

CASE Partner: Deltares/Environment Agency (https://www.deltares.nl/en/)

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear ,

Kate Spencer at QMUL has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Geraldene Wharton as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for QMUL School of Geography, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Geraldene Wharton is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Microplastic sources and interactions from catchment to coast (Ref: 15519)

Theme: Environmental Hazards & Pollution
Supervisory Team: Kate Spencer (School of Geography, QMUL), Geraldene Wharton (School of Geography, QMUL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Kate Heppell c.m.heppell@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Kate,

Kate Spencer submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 16/06/2017 at 5:42 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Microplastic sources and interactions from catchment to coast (Ref: 15519)

Theme: Environmental Hazards & Pollution
Supervisory Team: Kate Spencer (School of Geography, QMUL), Geraldene Wharton (School of Geography, QMUL)

Description:

The accelerating global release of microplastics (mP) into the aquatic environment seems inevitable, with long-term consequences for water quality and biodiversity. Managing plastics in the environment and ensuring effective intervention policies and practices requires an understanding of mP source, transport and fate. There has been a significant amount of research exploring the occurrence of mP in environmental media (e.g., water, sediment, soil) and examining uptake and impacts on aquatic organisms (Woodall et al., 2014; Ivar do Sul & Costa, 2014) particularly in marine environments. However, much less is known of their wider impact on ecosystem functioning.

This PhD will focus on the sources of mPs, how they interact with fine sediment and their fluxes from catchment to coast in association with carbon, microbiota and sediment. Particular areas of interest could include the fate of mP as they transition from fresh to saline water conditions (i.e. estuaries and deltas), the interactions between mP and fine sediment and impacts for sediment flux or release of degraded mPs from the UK’s > 1200 historic coastal landfills that are at risk from tidal storm surges, flooding, sea level rise and erosion (Brand et al. 2017; Brand and Spencer 2019).

This PhD is aligned with the EU Interreg IV project Preventing Plastic Pollution and could include Case Partners – Deltares or the Environment Agency.

Deltares are an independent research institute for applied water research specializing in coastal and delta systems. They provide fundamental science expertise in the fields of coastal systems, sediment transport modelling and coastal management and host state-of-the-art large-scale flume and wave basin facilities, and well-equipped sediment and soil laboratories for applied research and sample characterisation. They have an excellent track record in translating science into real-world management solutions, delivering high-impact science, and successfully managing major projects (including running very large EU-funded pure and applied science projects).

Policy Impact:

Improved understanding of how microplastics are transported from catchment to coast will have impacts for compliance with Water Framework Directive, whilst an understanding of how different types of plastic impact wide ecosystem functioning can inform the development of new intervention policies on plastic reduction.

Background Reading:
Horton et al. 2017 STOTEN 586: 127–141
Brand, J.H. and Spencer, K.L. (2019). Potential contamination of the coastal zone by eroding historic landfills. Marine Pollution Bulletin, 146: pp. 282–291
Brand, J.H., Spencer, K.L., O’Shea, F.T. and Lindsay, J.E. (2017). Potential pollution risks of historic landfills on low-lying coasts and estuaries. Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Water, wat2.1264

CASE Partner: Deltares/Environment Agency (https://www.deltares.nl/en/)

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear ,

Kate Spencer submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 16/06/2017 at 5:42 pm, listing Geraldene Wharton as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Geraldene Wharton is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Microplastic sources and interactions from catchment to coast (Ref: 15519)

Theme: Environmental Hazards & Pollution
Supervisory Team: Kate Spencer (School of Geography, QMUL), Geraldene Wharton (School of Geography, QMUL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Kate Spencer k.spencer@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Kate,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 24/09/2024.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Kate Spencer k.spencer@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Kate,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “Microplastic sources and interactions from catchment to coast” has not been updated since 25/09/2023. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 24/09/2024, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Kate Spencer k.spencer@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 15519) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Kate,

Project (ref: 15519) “Microplastic sources and interactions from catchment to coast”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Mark Trimmer m.trimmer@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Mark,

Alexander Ruban has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Molecular factors ensuring high adaptability of Hedera helix to the light environment (Ref: 15526)

Theme: Evolution & Adaptation
Supervisory Team: Alexander Ruban (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL), Ilia Leitch (Comparative Plant and Fungal Biology, KEW)

Description:

Photosynthetic organisms often face fluctuations in light intensity. The knowledge of the molecular mechanisms that enable exceptionally adaptable species to survive extreme environments is of paramount importance for understanding the patterns of plant evolution in changing climate. The most vulnerable to high light is Photosystem II (PSII). However, PSII possess a protective mechanism against excess light via dissipating excess energy in into heat, called NPQ.

The molecular mechanism of NPQ includes generation in high light of a proton gradient across the membrane that affects the structural state of PSII light harvesting antenna (LHCII), that collects and delivers light energy for the reaction center.

Whilst there has been a lot of progress made towards establishment of a molecular mechanism of NPQ little if none is known about how efficiently it works in different plant species and why some of them like Hedera helix can equally well adopt to extreme shade and excessively high light. Indeed, such knowledge would offer an invaluable insight on the molecular factors that determine efficient and fast light- tracking of the light environment by plants without compromising the PSII quantum efficiency. Therefore, the key objective of this program is to apply an array of biochemical, spectroscopic and physiological approaches to find out what molecular factors of the photosynthetic membrane are actually enabling Hedera helix to live in the various light environments.

Policy Impact:

The knowledge of the molecular mechanisms that enable successful plant species to survive extreme environments is key for understanding the patterns of plant invasive strategies as well as evolution in changing climate and prediction of the consequences to our planet’s plant communities.

Background Reading:
Johnson, M.P., Goral,T.K., Duffy, C.D.P., Brain, A.P.R., Mullineaux, C.W. and Ruban, A.V. (2011) Photoprotective energy dissipation involves the reorganization of photosystem II light harvesting complexes in the grana membranes of higher plant chloroplasts. Plant Cell, 23, 1468-1479.
Belgio, E., Kapitonova, E., Chmeliov, E., Duffy, C.D.P., Ungerer, P., Valkunas, L., Ruban, A.V. (2014) Economic photoprotection in Photosystem II that retains a complete light harvesting system with slow energy traps. Nature communications.
Ruban, A.V. (2014) Evolution under the Sun: optimising light harvesting in photosynthesis. Journal of Experimental Botany.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To: Mark Chase M.Chase@kew.org
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Mark,

Alexander Ruban at QMUL has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Ilia Leitch as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for QMUL School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Ilia Leitch is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Molecular factors ensuring high adaptability of Hedera helix to the light environment (Ref: 15526)

Theme: Evolution & Adaptation
Supervisory Team: Alexander Ruban (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL), Ilia Leitch (Comparative Plant and Fungal Biology, KEW)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Mark Trimmer m.trimmer@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Mark,

Alexander Ruban submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 16/06/2017 at 6:38 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Molecular factors ensuring high adaptability of Hedera helix to the light environment (Ref: 15526)

Theme: Evolution & Adaptation
Supervisory Team: Alexander Ruban (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL), Ilia Leitch (Comparative Plant and Fungal Biology, KEW)

Description:

Photosynthetic organisms often face fluctuations in light intensity. The knowledge of the molecular mechanisms that enable exceptionally adaptable species to survive extreme environments is of paramount importance for understanding the patterns of plant evolution in changing climate. The most vulnerable to high light is Photosystem II (PSII). However, PSII possess a protective mechanism against excess light via dissipating excess energy in into heat, called NPQ.

The molecular mechanism of NPQ includes generation in high light of a proton gradient across the membrane that affects the structural state of PSII light harvesting antenna (LHCII), that collects and delivers light energy for the reaction center.

Whilst there has been a lot of progress made towards establishment of a molecular mechanism of NPQ little if none is known about how efficiently it works in different plant species and why some of them like Hedera helix can equally well adopt to extreme shade and excessively high light. Indeed, such knowledge would offer an invaluable insight on the molecular factors that determine efficient and fast light- tracking of the light environment by plants without compromising the PSII quantum efficiency. Therefore, the key objective of this program is to apply an array of biochemical, spectroscopic and physiological approaches to find out what molecular factors of the photosynthetic membrane are actually enabling Hedera helix to live in the various light environments.

Policy Impact:

The knowledge of the molecular mechanisms that enable successful plant species to survive extreme environments is key for understanding the patterns of plant invasive strategies as well as evolution in changing climate and prediction of the consequences to our planet’s plant communities.

Background Reading:
Johnson, M.P., Goral,T.K., Duffy, C.D.P., Brain, A.P.R., Mullineaux, C.W. and Ruban, A.V. (2011) Photoprotective energy dissipation involves the reorganization of photosystem II light harvesting complexes in the grana membranes of higher plant chloroplasts. Plant Cell, 23, 1468-1479.
Belgio, E., Kapitonova, E., Chmeliov, E., Duffy, C.D.P., Ungerer, P., Valkunas, L., Ruban, A.V. (2014) Economic photoprotection in Photosystem II that retains a complete light harvesting system with slow energy traps. Nature communications.
Ruban, A.V. (2014) Evolution under the Sun: optimising light harvesting in photosynthesis. Journal of Experimental Botany.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To: Mark Chase M.Chase@kew.org
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear Mark,

Alexander Ruban submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 16/06/2017 at 6:38 pm, listing Ilia Leitch as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Ilia Leitch is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Molecular factors ensuring high adaptability of Hedera helix to the light environment (Ref: 15526)

Theme: Evolution & Adaptation
Supervisory Team: Alexander Ruban (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL), Ilia Leitch (Comparative Plant and Fungal Biology, KEW)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Alexander Ruban a.ruban@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Alexander,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 06/04/2019.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Alexander Ruban a.ruban@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Alexander,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “Molecular factors ensuring high adaptability of Hedera helix to the light environment” has not been updated since 16/06/2017. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 06/04/2019, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Alexander Ruban a.ruban@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 15526) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Alexander,

Project (ref: 15526) “Molecular factors ensuring high adaptability of Hedera helix to the light environment”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Michel Tsamados m.tsamados@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Michel,

Kevin Pickering has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Timing and controls on evolution of deep-marine lobe and related deposits, Eocene Hecho Group, Jaca basin, Spanish Pyrenees (Ref: 15529)

Theme: Past Life & Environments
Supervisory Team: Kevin Pickering (Earth Sciences, UCL), Paul Bown (Earth Sciences, UCL)

Description:

Deep-marine sandy lobe and related deposits form an important part of modern and ancient submarine fans. A wide range of field/laboratory techniques will be used to understand the timing and controls on the 3-D architecture and building processes/patterns of lobe deposits in world-class outcrops in the Middle Eocene Ainsa-Jaca basin, Spanish Pyrenees (~50-40 Ma).

Pickering and students have studied the proximal Ainsa Basin, providing a geological framework for research, and in the adjoining more distal Jaca Basin. Correlations of individual beds will be made (including so-called “hybrid-event beds”) and packages of beds (lobe-and-related deposits ), using mapping, biostratigraphic (calcareous nannofossils), petrographic, and geochemical studies.

Time-series analysis of bed thickness and geochemical data will be used to investigate any global climate signals in controlling deposition (at Milankovitch frequencies, as demonstrated for the fine-grained sedimentation ion the Ainsa Basin).

This project should appeal to prospective students interested in research with a strong fieldwork component leading to an improved understanding of controls on deep-marine siliciclastic systems in deep time.

Cantalejo, B. & Pickering, K.T. 2015. Orbital forcing as principal driver for fine-grained deep-marine siliciclastic sediments, Middle-Eocene Ainsa Basin, Spanish Pyrenees. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 421, 24–47.
Cantalejo, B. & Pickering, K.T. 2014. Climate forcing of fine-grained deep-marine system in an active tectonic setting: Middle Eocene, Ainsa Basin, Spanish Pyrenees. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 410, 351–371.
Pickering, K.T. & Bayliss, N.J. 2009. Deconvolving tectono-climatic signals in deep-marine siliciclastics, Eocene Ainsa basin, Spanish Pyrenees: Seesaw tectonics versus eustasy. Geology, 37, 203–206. doi: 10.1130/G25261A.1; 4 figures; 1 insert.

Policy Impact:

This research will help understand the controls on deep-marine sedimentary environments in deep time, e.g., climate versus tectonics.

Background Reading:
Cantalejo, B., Pickering, K.T., Miller, K.G. & Mac Niocaill, C. 2021. Chasing the 400-kyr pacing of deep-marine sandy submarine fans: Middle Eocene Aínsa Basin, Spanish Pyrenees. Journal of the Geological Society, London, 178.
Cantalejo, B., Pickering, K.T., McNiocaill, C., Bown, P., Johansen, K. & Grant, M. 2021. A revised age-model for the Eocene deep-marine siliciclastic systems, Aínsa Basin, Spanish Pyrenees. Journal of the Geological Society, London, 178.
Cornard, P.H. & Pickering, K.T. 2020. Submarine topographic control on distribution of supercritical-flow deposits in lobe and-related environments, Middle Eocene, Jaca Basin, Spanish Pyrenees. Journal of Sedimentary Research, 90, 1222–1243.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear ,

Kevin Pickering at UCL has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Paul Bown as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for UCL Earth Sciences, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Paul Bown is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Timing and controls on evolution of deep-marine lobe and related deposits, Eocene Hecho Group, Jaca basin, Spanish Pyrenees (Ref: 15529)

Theme: Past Life & Environments
Supervisory Team: Kevin Pickering (Earth Sciences, UCL), Paul Bown (Earth Sciences, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Michel Tsamados m.tsamados@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Michel,

Kevin Pickering submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 16/06/2017 at 7:05 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Timing and controls on evolution of deep-marine lobe and related deposits, Eocene Hecho Group, Jaca basin, Spanish Pyrenees (Ref: 15529)

Theme: Past Life & Environments
Supervisory Team: Kevin Pickering (Earth Sciences, UCL), Paul Bown (Earth Sciences, UCL)

Description:

Deep-marine sandy lobe and related deposits form an important part of modern and ancient submarine fans. A wide range of field/laboratory techniques will be used to understand the timing and controls on the 3-D architecture and building processes/patterns of lobe deposits in world-class outcrops in the Middle Eocene Ainsa-Jaca basin, Spanish Pyrenees (~50-40 Ma).

Pickering and students have studied the proximal Ainsa Basin, providing a geological framework for research, and in the adjoining more distal Jaca Basin. Correlations of individual beds will be made (including so-called “hybrid-event beds”) and packages of beds (lobe-and-related deposits ), using mapping, biostratigraphic (calcareous nannofossils), petrographic, and geochemical studies.

Time-series analysis of bed thickness and geochemical data will be used to investigate any global climate signals in controlling deposition (at Milankovitch frequencies, as demonstrated for the fine-grained sedimentation ion the Ainsa Basin).

This project should appeal to prospective students interested in research with a strong fieldwork component leading to an improved understanding of controls on deep-marine siliciclastic systems in deep time.

Cantalejo, B. & Pickering, K.T. 2015. Orbital forcing as principal driver for fine-grained deep-marine siliciclastic sediments, Middle-Eocene Ainsa Basin, Spanish Pyrenees. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 421, 24–47.
Cantalejo, B. & Pickering, K.T. 2014. Climate forcing of fine-grained deep-marine system in an active tectonic setting: Middle Eocene, Ainsa Basin, Spanish Pyrenees. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 410, 351–371.
Pickering, K.T. & Bayliss, N.J. 2009. Deconvolving tectono-climatic signals in deep-marine siliciclastics, Eocene Ainsa basin, Spanish Pyrenees: Seesaw tectonics versus eustasy. Geology, 37, 203–206. doi: 10.1130/G25261A.1; 4 figures; 1 insert.

Policy Impact:

This research will help understand the controls on deep-marine sedimentary environments in deep time, e.g., climate versus tectonics.

Background Reading:
Cantalejo, B., Pickering, K.T., Miller, K.G. & Mac Niocaill, C. 2021. Chasing the 400-kyr pacing of deep-marine sandy submarine fans: Middle Eocene Aínsa Basin, Spanish Pyrenees. Journal of the Geological Society, London, 178.
Cantalejo, B., Pickering, K.T., McNiocaill, C., Bown, P., Johansen, K. & Grant, M. 2021. A revised age-model for the Eocene deep-marine siliciclastic systems, Aínsa Basin, Spanish Pyrenees. Journal of the Geological Society, London, 178.
Cornard, P.H. & Pickering, K.T. 2020. Submarine topographic control on distribution of supercritical-flow deposits in lobe and-related environments, Middle Eocene, Jaca Basin, Spanish Pyrenees. Journal of Sedimentary Research, 90, 1222–1243.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear ,

Kevin Pickering submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 16/06/2017 at 7:05 pm, listing Paul Bown as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Paul Bown is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Timing and controls on evolution of deep-marine lobe and related deposits, Eocene Hecho Group, Jaca basin, Spanish Pyrenees (Ref: 15529)

Theme: Past Life & Environments
Supervisory Team: Kevin Pickering (Earth Sciences, UCL), Paul Bown (Earth Sciences, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Kevin Pickering kt.pickering@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Kevin,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 05/06/2024.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Kevin Pickering kt.pickering@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Kevin,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “Timing and controls on evolution of deep-marine lobe and related deposits, Eocene Hecho Group, Jaca basin, Spanish Pyrenees” has not been updated since 06/06/2023. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 05/06/2024, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Kevin Pickering kt.pickering@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 15529) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Kevin,

Project (ref: 15529) “Timing and controls on evolution of deep-marine lobe and related deposits, Eocene Hecho Group, Jaca basin, Spanish Pyrenees”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Chris Carbone Chris.Carbone@zsl.org
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Chris,

Nathalie Pettorelli has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Assessing climate change vulnerability of arid ecosystems using satellite information: the Khar Us protected area as a case study (Ref: 15530)

Theme: Environmental Physics & Mathematical Modelling
Supervisory Team: Nathalie Pettorelli (Biodiversity and Macroecology Theme, IOZ), Mathias Disney (Geography, UCL)

Description:

This project will demonstrate how remote sensing information can be successfully used to inform climate change vulnerability assessments of arid ecosystems, focusing on the Khovd province in Mongolia, a region expected to be highly susceptible to future changes in climatic conditions. Khovd is an agricultural province that has a cold desert climate with long, dry, frigid winters and short warm summers; precipitation is minimal and very heavily concentrated in summer. The province is home to a key protected area for Mongolia (the Khar Us), which provides a safe haven for many bird species and for charismatic wildlife such as snow leopards.

Using remote sensing information, the project will (1) quantify the current impacts of climate change on ecosystem structure and functions in Khar Us; (2) explore how human-induced land use change inside and outside the protected area can exacerbate the impacts of climate change on biodiversity; and (3) assess the current and future vulnerability of this key protected area to changes in climatic conditions. While doing so, the project will provide a concrete example of how remote sensing information can be effectively combined to monitor key aspects of biodiversity and inform management on the ground.

Policy Impact:

The Khar-Us protected area holds critically important biodiversity for Mongolia and is surrounded by rapidly changing communities, adapting to sedentary life after a history of nomadic pastoralism. Many worry that climate change could impact pasture quality, livestock mortality as well as cashmere quality and quantity. These impacts could exacerbate human wildlife conflicts, adding to the direct pressures of climate change on biodiversity. The research will be used to advise local people, government and conservation organisations working in and around Khar-Us on the possible opportunities for current and future climate change impacts on biodiversity to be mitigated.

Background Reading:
Durant et al. (2012) “Forgotten biodiversity in desert ecosystems”. Science 336: 1379-1380 Pfeifer et al. (2012) “Terrestrial ecosystems from space: a review of earth observation products for macroecology applications”.
Global Ecology and Biogeography 21: 603-624
Freemantle et al. (2013) “Earth Observation: overlooked potential to support species reintroduction programmes”. African Journal of Ecology 51: 482-492

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To: Andrew Barry a.barry@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Andrew,

Nathalie Pettorelli at IOZ has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Mathias Disney as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for IOZ Biodiversity and Macroecology Theme, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Mathias Disney is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Assessing climate change vulnerability of arid ecosystems using satellite information: the Khar Us protected area as a case study (Ref: 15530)

Theme: Environmental Physics & Mathematical Modelling
Supervisory Team: Nathalie Pettorelli (Biodiversity and Macroecology Theme, IOZ), Mathias Disney (Geography, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Chris Carbone Chris.Carbone@zsl.org
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Chris,

Nathalie Pettorelli submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 16/06/2017 at 7:09 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Assessing climate change vulnerability of arid ecosystems using satellite information: the Khar Us protected area as a case study (Ref: 15530)

Theme: Environmental Physics & Mathematical Modelling
Supervisory Team: Nathalie Pettorelli (Biodiversity and Macroecology Theme, IOZ), Mathias Disney (Geography, UCL)

Description:

This project will demonstrate how remote sensing information can be successfully used to inform climate change vulnerability assessments of arid ecosystems, focusing on the Khovd province in Mongolia, a region expected to be highly susceptible to future changes in climatic conditions. Khovd is an agricultural province that has a cold desert climate with long, dry, frigid winters and short warm summers; precipitation is minimal and very heavily concentrated in summer. The province is home to a key protected area for Mongolia (the Khar Us), which provides a safe haven for many bird species and for charismatic wildlife such as snow leopards.

Using remote sensing information, the project will (1) quantify the current impacts of climate change on ecosystem structure and functions in Khar Us; (2) explore how human-induced land use change inside and outside the protected area can exacerbate the impacts of climate change on biodiversity; and (3) assess the current and future vulnerability of this key protected area to changes in climatic conditions. While doing so, the project will provide a concrete example of how remote sensing information can be effectively combined to monitor key aspects of biodiversity and inform management on the ground.

Policy Impact:

The Khar-Us protected area holds critically important biodiversity for Mongolia and is surrounded by rapidly changing communities, adapting to sedentary life after a history of nomadic pastoralism. Many worry that climate change could impact pasture quality, livestock mortality as well as cashmere quality and quantity. These impacts could exacerbate human wildlife conflicts, adding to the direct pressures of climate change on biodiversity. The research will be used to advise local people, government and conservation organisations working in and around Khar-Us on the possible opportunities for current and future climate change impacts on biodiversity to be mitigated.

Background Reading:
Durant et al. (2012) “Forgotten biodiversity in desert ecosystems”. Science 336: 1379-1380 Pfeifer et al. (2012) “Terrestrial ecosystems from space: a review of earth observation products for macroecology applications”.
Global Ecology and Biogeography 21: 603-624
Freemantle et al. (2013) “Earth Observation: overlooked potential to support species reintroduction programmes”. African Journal of Ecology 51: 482-492

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To: Andrew Barry a.barry@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear Andrew,

Nathalie Pettorelli submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 16/06/2017 at 7:09 pm, listing Mathias Disney as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Mathias Disney is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Assessing climate change vulnerability of arid ecosystems using satellite information: the Khar Us protected area as a case study (Ref: 15530)

Theme: Environmental Physics & Mathematical Modelling
Supervisory Team: Nathalie Pettorelli (Biodiversity and Macroecology Theme, IOZ), Mathias Disney (Geography, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Nathalie Pettorelli nathalie.pettorelli@ioz.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Nathalie,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 08/10/2024.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Nathalie Pettorelli nathalie.pettorelli@ioz.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Nathalie,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “Assessing climate change vulnerability of arid ecosystems using satellite information: the Khar Us protected area as a case study” has not been updated since 22/09/2022. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 08/10/2024, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Nathalie Pettorelli nathalie.pettorelli@ioz.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 15530) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Nathalie,

Project (ref: 15530) “Assessing climate change vulnerability of arid ecosystems using satellite information: the Khar Us protected area as a case study”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Andrew Pomiankowski a.pomiankowski@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Andrew,

Richard Pearson has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Stability of complex ecological networks under climate change (Ref: 15533)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Richard Pearson (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL), Simone Severini (Other, UCL)

Description:

Climate change is projected to have significant impacts on ecosystems, resulting in species-level extinctions and changes in community composition. Although a great deal of research has focused on predicting responses of individual species to climate change, potential impacts at the community-level remain poorly understood.

Many attempts to predict the responses of species to climate change have used ecological niche models (species distribution models), but this single-species approach ignores interactions between species and thus tells us little about responses at the community-level. This PhD project will integrate ecological niche models with simulations of multi-species networks and field experiments using a research site in the Swiss Alps. A novel ecological network model will be used to analyse multi-species systems and the stability of these systems will then be examined under scenarios of environmental change.

It is hoped that the project will advance methods for identifying types of ecosystem that are most vulnerable to climate change.

Policy Impact:

Conceptual advances made will guide future empirical research, including laboratory and field experimentation, and will inform conservation strategies; in particular, it is expected that the analysis of complex interactions and feedbacks between species will support arguments for ‘whole-ecosystem’ approaches to biodiversity conservation.

Background Reading:
Staniczenko, P.P.A., Sivasubramaniam, P., Suttle, K.B., & Pearson, R.G. 2017. Linking macroecology and community ecology: Refining predictions of species distributions using biotic interaction networks. Ecology Letters, doi: 10.1111/ele.12770.
Alexander, J.M., Diez, J.M., Hart, S.P. & Levine, J.M. (2016). When climate reshuffles competitors: a call for experimental macroecology. Trends Ecol. Evol., 31, 831–841
Montoya, José M.et al. 2006. Ecological Networks and Their Fragility. Nature 442:259–264

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To: Kevin Fowler k.fowler@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Kevin,

Richard Pearson at UCL has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Simone Severini as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for UCL Genetics, Evolution and Environment, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Simone Severini is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Stability of complex ecological networks under climate change (Ref: 15533)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Richard Pearson (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL), Simone Severini (Other, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Andrew Pomiankowski a.pomiankowski@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Andrew,

Richard Pearson submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 16/06/2017 at 7:27 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Stability of complex ecological networks under climate change (Ref: 15533)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Richard Pearson (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL), Simone Severini (Other, UCL)

Description:

Climate change is projected to have significant impacts on ecosystems, resulting in species-level extinctions and changes in community composition. Although a great deal of research has focused on predicting responses of individual species to climate change, potential impacts at the community-level remain poorly understood.

Many attempts to predict the responses of species to climate change have used ecological niche models (species distribution models), but this single-species approach ignores interactions between species and thus tells us little about responses at the community-level. This PhD project will integrate ecological niche models with simulations of multi-species networks and field experiments using a research site in the Swiss Alps. A novel ecological network model will be used to analyse multi-species systems and the stability of these systems will then be examined under scenarios of environmental change.

It is hoped that the project will advance methods for identifying types of ecosystem that are most vulnerable to climate change.

Policy Impact:

Conceptual advances made will guide future empirical research, including laboratory and field experimentation, and will inform conservation strategies; in particular, it is expected that the analysis of complex interactions and feedbacks between species will support arguments for ‘whole-ecosystem’ approaches to biodiversity conservation.

Background Reading:
Staniczenko, P.P.A., Sivasubramaniam, P., Suttle, K.B., & Pearson, R.G. 2017. Linking macroecology and community ecology: Refining predictions of species distributions using biotic interaction networks. Ecology Letters, doi: 10.1111/ele.12770.
Alexander, J.M., Diez, J.M., Hart, S.P. & Levine, J.M. (2016). When climate reshuffles competitors: a call for experimental macroecology. Trends Ecol. Evol., 31, 831–841
Montoya, José M.et al. 2006. Ecological Networks and Their Fragility. Nature 442:259–264

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To: Kevin Fowler k.fowler@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear Kevin,

Richard Pearson submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 16/06/2017 at 7:27 pm, listing Simone Severini as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Simone Severini is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Stability of complex ecological networks under climate change (Ref: 15533)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Richard Pearson (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL), Simone Severini (Other, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Richard Pearson richard.pearson@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Richard,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 10/09/2024.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Richard Pearson richard.pearson@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Richard,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “Stability of complex ecological networks under climate change” has not been updated since 11/09/2023. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 10/09/2024, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Richard Pearson richard.pearson@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 15533) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Richard,

Project (ref: 15533) “Stability of complex ecological networks under climate change”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Andrew Pomiankowski a.pomiankowski@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Andrew,

David Murrell has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Linking patterns and processes in tropical forests (Ref: 15536)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: David Murrell (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL), Sofia Olhede (Statistical Science, UCL)

Description:

Tropical forests are one of our most cherished natural assets harbouring many of the world’s important biodiversity hotspots. Despite this we know remarkably little about how this richness is regulated and maintained.

This project will combine long-term individual-based data with environmental data and estimates of species-specific traits for over 300species of tree occurring within the same 50ha plot and will answer questions such as: Does tree biodiversity peak at intermediate soil nutrient ratios, as predicted by resource-ratio theory? Can competition between neighbouring trees of different species be adequately described by their traits (eg wood density)? How much are the spatial arrangements of species caused by niche-based (competition, habitat association) and neutral-based (dispersal limitation) processes?

The project will primarily involve analysis of extant data with potentially some modelling; but also has the opportunity for fieldwork where new data is required.

Policy Impact:

The student will be trained in 3 (modelling, numeracy, multidisciplinarity) of the first 4 NERC Most Wanted key skills of the Environment Sector.

This work will also indirectly benefit policies aimed at management, restoration and conservation of forests.

Background Reading:
Flügge, Olhede, & Murrell (2012) The memory of spatial patterns- aggregation and population size changes in a tropical forest. Ecology, 93:1540–1549Vogt,
Murrell, Stoll (2010) Testing spatial theories of plant coexistence. The American Naturalist 175 (1), 73-84
Murrell (2009) On the emergent spatial structure of size-structured populations: when does self-thinning lead to a reduction in clustering? Journal of Ecology, 97, 256-266

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To: Richard Chandler r.chandler@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Richard,

David Murrell at UCL has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Sofia Olhede as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for UCL Genetics, Evolution and Environment, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Sofia Olhede is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Linking patterns and processes in tropical forests (Ref: 15536)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: David Murrell (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL), Sofia Olhede (Statistical Science, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Andrew Pomiankowski a.pomiankowski@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Andrew,

David Murrell submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 16/06/2017 at 7:41 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Linking patterns and processes in tropical forests (Ref: 15536)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: David Murrell (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL), Sofia Olhede (Statistical Science, UCL)

Description:

Tropical forests are one of our most cherished natural assets harbouring many of the world’s important biodiversity hotspots. Despite this we know remarkably little about how this richness is regulated and maintained.

This project will combine long-term individual-based data with environmental data and estimates of species-specific traits for over 300species of tree occurring within the same 50ha plot and will answer questions such as: Does tree biodiversity peak at intermediate soil nutrient ratios, as predicted by resource-ratio theory? Can competition between neighbouring trees of different species be adequately described by their traits (eg wood density)? How much are the spatial arrangements of species caused by niche-based (competition, habitat association) and neutral-based (dispersal limitation) processes?

The project will primarily involve analysis of extant data with potentially some modelling; but also has the opportunity for fieldwork where new data is required.

Policy Impact:

The student will be trained in 3 (modelling, numeracy, multidisciplinarity) of the first 4 NERC Most Wanted key skills of the Environment Sector.

This work will also indirectly benefit policies aimed at management, restoration and conservation of forests.

Background Reading:
Flügge, Olhede, & Murrell (2012) The memory of spatial patterns- aggregation and population size changes in a tropical forest. Ecology, 93:1540–1549Vogt,
Murrell, Stoll (2010) Testing spatial theories of plant coexistence. The American Naturalist 175 (1), 73-84
Murrell (2009) On the emergent spatial structure of size-structured populations: when does self-thinning lead to a reduction in clustering? Journal of Ecology, 97, 256-266

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To: Richard Chandler r.chandler@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear Richard,

David Murrell submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 16/06/2017 at 7:41 pm, listing Sofia Olhede as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Sofia Olhede is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Linking patterns and processes in tropical forests (Ref: 15536)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: David Murrell (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL), Sofia Olhede (Statistical Science, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: David Murrell d.murrell@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear David,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 10/09/2024.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: David Murrell d.murrell@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear David,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “Linking patterns and processes in tropical forests” has not been updated since 11/09/2023. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 10/09/2024, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: David Murrell d.murrell@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 15536) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear David,

Project (ref: 15536) “Linking patterns and processes in tropical forests”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Kate Heppell c.m.heppell@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Kate,

Sven Lukas has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Modelling former precipitation gradients during the Younger Dryas in Scotland (Ref: 15543)

Theme: Past Life & Environments
Supervisory Team: Sven Lukas (School of Geography, QMUL)

Description:

The Younger Dryas was a period of rapid climate change and the last period of severe glaciation that affected the amphi-North Atlantic region. Although well-studied, the effects of the prevailing atmospheric circulation pattern on the size and dynamics of ice masses remain unresolved (1, 2); however, such information is invaluable to constrain numerical models used to predict future rapid climate change.

Ice masses are the only proxies that enable a reliable reconstruction of former precipitation totals and prevailing wind field, therefore enabling to close the aforementioned data gap.

This project will address a large data gap in central Scotland, a key locus of Younger Dryas glaciation, through a combination of geomorphological mapping, sedimentological and geochronological methods. This research will be embedded within a Leverhulme-funded International Network (2013-2015) and ongoing interdisciplinary projects in collaboration with international partners from Norway and the USA.

Policy Impact:

The modelling community will get proxy data on Younger Dryas atmospheric processes; the Leverhulme IN will ensure close collaboration with modellers. Collaborations also exist with the bordering Cairngorms National Park, Scotish Natural Heritage and British Geological Survey.

Background Reading:
Bakke, J., Lie, Ø., Heegaard, E., Dokken, T., Haug, G.H., Birks, H.H., Dulski, P., Nilsen, T., 2009. Rapid oceanic and atmospheric changes during the Younger Dryas cold period. Nature Geoscience 2, 202-205
Lukas, S., Bradwell, T., 2010. Reconstruction of a lateglacial (Younger Dryas) mountain ice field in Sutherland, NW Scotland, and its palaeoclimatic implications. Journal of Quaternary Science 25, 567-580
Reinardy, B.T.I., Lukas, S., 2009. A comparison of the sedimentary signature of ice-contact sedimentation and deformation at macro- and micro-scale: a case study from NW Scotland. Sedimentary Geology 221, 87-98

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear ,

Sven Lukas at QMUL has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for QMUL School of Geography, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Modelling former precipitation gradients during the Younger Dryas in Scotland (Ref: 15543)

Theme: Past Life & Environments
Supervisory Team: Sven Lukas (School of Geography, QMUL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Kate Heppell c.m.heppell@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Kate,

Sven Lukas submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 16/06/2017 at 8:06 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Modelling former precipitation gradients during the Younger Dryas in Scotland (Ref: 15543)

Theme: Past Life & Environments
Supervisory Team: Sven Lukas (School of Geography, QMUL)

Description:

The Younger Dryas was a period of rapid climate change and the last period of severe glaciation that affected the amphi-North Atlantic region. Although well-studied, the effects of the prevailing atmospheric circulation pattern on the size and dynamics of ice masses remain unresolved (1, 2); however, such information is invaluable to constrain numerical models used to predict future rapid climate change.

Ice masses are the only proxies that enable a reliable reconstruction of former precipitation totals and prevailing wind field, therefore enabling to close the aforementioned data gap.

This project will address a large data gap in central Scotland, a key locus of Younger Dryas glaciation, through a combination of geomorphological mapping, sedimentological and geochronological methods. This research will be embedded within a Leverhulme-funded International Network (2013-2015) and ongoing interdisciplinary projects in collaboration with international partners from Norway and the USA.

Policy Impact:

The modelling community will get proxy data on Younger Dryas atmospheric processes; the Leverhulme IN will ensure close collaboration with modellers. Collaborations also exist with the bordering Cairngorms National Park, Scotish Natural Heritage and British Geological Survey.

Background Reading:
Bakke, J., Lie, Ø., Heegaard, E., Dokken, T., Haug, G.H., Birks, H.H., Dulski, P., Nilsen, T., 2009. Rapid oceanic and atmospheric changes during the Younger Dryas cold period. Nature Geoscience 2, 202-205
Lukas, S., Bradwell, T., 2010. Reconstruction of a lateglacial (Younger Dryas) mountain ice field in Sutherland, NW Scotland, and its palaeoclimatic implications. Journal of Quaternary Science 25, 567-580
Reinardy, B.T.I., Lukas, S., 2009. A comparison of the sedimentary signature of ice-contact sedimentation and deformation at macro- and micro-scale: a case study from NW Scotland. Sedimentary Geology 221, 87-98

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear ,

Sven Lukas submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 16/06/2017 at 8:06 pm, listing as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Modelling former precipitation gradients during the Younger Dryas in Scotland (Ref: 15543)

Theme: Past Life & Environments
Supervisory Team: Sven Lukas (School of Geography, QMUL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Sven Lukas s.lukas@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Sven,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 16/06/2018.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Sven Lukas s.lukas@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Sven,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “Modelling former precipitation gradients during the Younger Dryas in Scotland” has not been updated since 16/06/2017. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 16/06/2018, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Sven Lukas s.lukas@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 15543) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Sven,

Project (ref: 15543) “Modelling former precipitation gradients during the Younger Dryas in Scotland”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Danielle Schreve Danielle.Schreve@rhul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Danielle,

Christina Manning has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Ca isotopes as a potential tracer for CO2 in magmatic systems (Ref: 15545)

Theme: Natural & Biological Hazards
Supervisory Team: Christina Manning (Department of Earth Sciences, RHUL), Philip Pogge Von Strandmann (Earth Sciences, UCL)

Description:

The volatile content of magma has a significant control on the eruptive style of a volcano. Hence, constraining the source and flux of volatiles in magmatic systems can aid risk assessment, critical knowledge especially for overpopulated volcanic slopes. This project will investigate CO2 flux in volcanic systems emplaced in carbonate crust.

The CO2 concentration in both magma and hydrothermal fluids is expected to fractionate calcium isotopes, a new but potentially powerful tracer of these processes. This will provide insights into CO2 flux pathways, important for predicting the impact of volcanic eruptions. Initial work will focus on the heavily-populated, Roman volcanic province, where accurate predictions of eruptive style are extremely important.

Ca isotope data along with data from more traditional isotope systems, will be used to examine the processes occurring at these volcanic systems, and hence determine eruptive styles, and the potentially resulting risks and hazards.

Policy Impact:

A better understanding of magmatic CO2 fluxes will lead to better knowledge of volcano eruptive styles, and hence significantly contribute to volcanic hazard prediction.

Background Reading:
Troll V.R., Hilton D.R., Jolis E.M., Chadwick J.P., Blythe L.S., Deegan F.M., Schwarzkopf L.M. and Zimmer M. (2012) Crustal CO2 liberation during the 2006 eruption and earthquake events at Merapi volcano, Indonesia. Geophysical Research Letters 39, Issue 11
Carmela Freda, Mario Gaeta, Biagio Giaccio, Fabrizio Marra, Danilo M. Palladino, Piergiorgio Scarlato, Gianluca Sottili (2011) CO2 -driven large mafic explosive eruptions: the Pozzolane Rosse case study from the Colli Albani Volcanic District (Italy) Bulletin of Volcanology 73(3):241-256
Deegan, F. M. and Troll, V. R. and Freda, C. and Misiti, V. and Chadwick, J. P. and McLeod, C. L. and Davidson, J. P (2010) ’Magmacarbonate interaction processes and associated CO2 release at Merapi Volcano

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To: Michel Tsamados m.tsamados@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Michel,

Christina Manning at RHUL has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Philip Pogge Von Strandmann as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for RHUL Department of Earth Sciences, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Philip Pogge Von Strandmann is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Ca isotopes as a potential tracer for CO2 in magmatic systems (Ref: 15545)

Theme: Natural & Biological Hazards
Supervisory Team: Christina Manning (Department of Earth Sciences, RHUL), Philip Pogge Von Strandmann (Earth Sciences, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Danielle Schreve Danielle.Schreve@rhul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Danielle,

Christina Manning submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 16/06/2017 at 8:15 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Ca isotopes as a potential tracer for CO2 in magmatic systems (Ref: 15545)

Theme: Natural & Biological Hazards
Supervisory Team: Christina Manning (Department of Earth Sciences, RHUL), Philip Pogge Von Strandmann (Earth Sciences, UCL)

Description:

The volatile content of magma has a significant control on the eruptive style of a volcano. Hence, constraining the source and flux of volatiles in magmatic systems can aid risk assessment, critical knowledge especially for overpopulated volcanic slopes. This project will investigate CO2 flux in volcanic systems emplaced in carbonate crust.

The CO2 concentration in both magma and hydrothermal fluids is expected to fractionate calcium isotopes, a new but potentially powerful tracer of these processes. This will provide insights into CO2 flux pathways, important for predicting the impact of volcanic eruptions. Initial work will focus on the heavily-populated, Roman volcanic province, where accurate predictions of eruptive style are extremely important.

Ca isotope data along with data from more traditional isotope systems, will be used to examine the processes occurring at these volcanic systems, and hence determine eruptive styles, and the potentially resulting risks and hazards.

Policy Impact:

A better understanding of magmatic CO2 fluxes will lead to better knowledge of volcano eruptive styles, and hence significantly contribute to volcanic hazard prediction.

Background Reading:
Troll V.R., Hilton D.R., Jolis E.M., Chadwick J.P., Blythe L.S., Deegan F.M., Schwarzkopf L.M. and Zimmer M. (2012) Crustal CO2 liberation during the 2006 eruption and earthquake events at Merapi volcano, Indonesia. Geophysical Research Letters 39, Issue 11
Carmela Freda, Mario Gaeta, Biagio Giaccio, Fabrizio Marra, Danilo M. Palladino, Piergiorgio Scarlato, Gianluca Sottili (2011) CO2 -driven large mafic explosive eruptions: the Pozzolane Rosse case study from the Colli Albani Volcanic District (Italy) Bulletin of Volcanology 73(3):241-256
Deegan, F. M. and Troll, V. R. and Freda, C. and Misiti, V. and Chadwick, J. P. and McLeod, C. L. and Davidson, J. P (2010) ’Magmacarbonate interaction processes and associated CO2 release at Merapi Volcano

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To: Michel Tsamados m.tsamados@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear Michel,

Christina Manning submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 16/06/2017 at 8:15 pm, listing Philip Pogge Von Strandmann as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Philip Pogge Von Strandmann is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Ca isotopes as a potential tracer for CO2 in magmatic systems (Ref: 15545)

Theme: Natural & Biological Hazards
Supervisory Team: Christina Manning (Department of Earth Sciences, RHUL), Philip Pogge Von Strandmann (Earth Sciences, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Christina Manning C.J.Manning@rhul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Christina,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 04/06/2019.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Christina Manning C.J.Manning@rhul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Christina,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “Ca isotopes as a potential tracer for CO2 in magmatic systems” has not been updated since 06/04/2018. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 04/06/2019, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Christina Manning C.J.Manning@rhul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 15545) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Christina,

Project (ref: 15545) “Ca isotopes as a potential tracer for CO2 in magmatic systems”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Andrew Barry a.barry@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Andrew,

Helene Burningham has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

The importance of inlets and their tidal deltas on the sediment dynamics and flood and erosion risk management of low-lying coastal systems (Ref: 15550)

Theme: Earth, Atmosphere & Ocean Processes
Supervisory Team: Helene Burningham (Geography, UCL), Jon French (Geography, UCL)

Description:

Coastal inlets are important connections between estuaries, lagoons and the open coast, but they are also instrumental mechanisms in the alongshore transport of sediment. Worldwide research on tidal inlets has shown that the processes of sediment transport within the inlet region are dependent on both estuarine and open-coast, nearshore dynamics. But we also know that changes in the morphology and behaviour of the inlet and its associated sediment bodies can have far-reaching impacts on adjacent coastlines. Capturing the dynamic interactions between wave-tide processes, sediment fluxes and shoreline change is a challenging but an essential requirement for effective shoreline management decision-making.

The aim of this PhD is to twofold. The project comprises a significant survey-based component, to undertake high resolution monitoring of inlet dynamics (using UAV-technology) and coastal / estuarine hydrodynamics, in order to quantify morphodynamic change and coast-inlet-estuary sediment budgets. The project will also involve modelling, using the SWAN wave model to explore the role of the inlet system on shoreline wave dynamics, and will also with the MESO_i model (which was evolved in the NERC-funded and EA-supported iCOASST project), progressing further model development and application in order to explore the role of climate change and management decisions on inlet function and behaviour. The PhD will investigate the relative importance of wave and tidal processes in determining the nature and timing of inlet morphodynamics, and examine the coupling between inlet, alongshore and estuarine sediment bodies.

Policy Impact:

Management decisions within the vicinity of inlets can have far-reaching impacts (within estuary and some distance alongshore). An improved understanding of sediment dynamics, shoreline behaviour and the affect of changes in coastal climates and engineering activities on these is needed in order to inform flood and coastal risk management decisions.

Background Reading:
Burningham, H; French, J; (2006) Morphodynamic behaviour of a mixed sand-gravel ebb-tidal delta: Deben estuary, Suffolk, UK. Marine Geology, 225 (1-4), 23-44.
Burningham, H; French, J; (2017) Understanding coastal change using shoreline trend analysis supported by cluster-based segmentation. Geomorphology, 282, 131-149.
Van Maanen, B.; Walkden, M.J.A., Nicholls, R. J. (2015) Modelling inlet dynamics to explore coupled system behaviour over decadal scales. Coastal Sediments 2015 (Proceedings of). San Diego, ISBN: 978-981-4689-96-0

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear ,

Helene Burningham at UCL has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Jon French as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for UCL Geography, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Jon French is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

The importance of inlets and their tidal deltas on the sediment dynamics and flood and erosion risk management of low-lying coastal systems (Ref: 15550)

Theme: Earth, Atmosphere & Ocean Processes
Supervisory Team: Helene Burningham (Geography, UCL), Jon French (Geography, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Andrew Barry a.barry@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Andrew,

Helene Burningham submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 18/08/2017 at 8:16 am. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

The importance of inlets and their tidal deltas on the sediment dynamics and flood and erosion risk management of low-lying coastal systems (Ref: 15550)

Theme: Earth, Atmosphere & Ocean Processes
Supervisory Team: Helene Burningham (Geography, UCL), Jon French (Geography, UCL)

Description:

Coastal inlets are important connections between estuaries, lagoons and the open coast, but they are also instrumental mechanisms in the alongshore transport of sediment. Worldwide research on tidal inlets has shown that the processes of sediment transport within the inlet region are dependent on both estuarine and open-coast, nearshore dynamics. But we also know that changes in the morphology and behaviour of the inlet and its associated sediment bodies can have far-reaching impacts on adjacent coastlines. Capturing the dynamic interactions between wave-tide processes, sediment fluxes and shoreline change is a challenging but an essential requirement for effective shoreline management decision-making.

The aim of this PhD is to twofold. The project comprises a significant survey-based component, to undertake high resolution monitoring of inlet dynamics (using UAV-technology) and coastal / estuarine hydrodynamics, in order to quantify morphodynamic change and coast-inlet-estuary sediment budgets. The project will also involve modelling, using the SWAN wave model to explore the role of the inlet system on shoreline wave dynamics, and will also with the MESO_i model (which was evolved in the NERC-funded and EA-supported iCOASST project), progressing further model development and application in order to explore the role of climate change and management decisions on inlet function and behaviour. The PhD will investigate the relative importance of wave and tidal processes in determining the nature and timing of inlet morphodynamics, and examine the coupling between inlet, alongshore and estuarine sediment bodies.

Policy Impact:

Management decisions within the vicinity of inlets can have far-reaching impacts (within estuary and some distance alongshore). An improved understanding of sediment dynamics, shoreline behaviour and the affect of changes in coastal climates and engineering activities on these is needed in order to inform flood and coastal risk management decisions.

Background Reading:
Burningham, H; French, J; (2006) Morphodynamic behaviour of a mixed sand-gravel ebb-tidal delta: Deben estuary, Suffolk, UK. Marine Geology, 225 (1-4), 23-44.
Burningham, H; French, J; (2017) Understanding coastal change using shoreline trend analysis supported by cluster-based segmentation. Geomorphology, 282, 131-149.
Van Maanen, B.; Walkden, M.J.A., Nicholls, R. J. (2015) Modelling inlet dynamics to explore coupled system behaviour over decadal scales. Coastal Sediments 2015 (Proceedings of). San Diego, ISBN: 978-981-4689-96-0

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear ,

Helene Burningham submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 18/08/2017 at 8:16 am, listing Jon French as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Jon French is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

The importance of inlets and their tidal deltas on the sediment dynamics and flood and erosion risk management of low-lying coastal systems (Ref: 15550)

Theme: Earth, Atmosphere & Ocean Processes
Supervisory Team: Helene Burningham (Geography, UCL), Jon French (Geography, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Helene Burningham h.burningham@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Helene,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 08/07/2022.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Helene Burningham h.burningham@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Helene,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “The importance of inlets and their tidal deltas on the sediment dynamics and flood and erosion risk management of low-lying coastal systems” has not been updated since 19/08/2020. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 08/07/2022, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Helene Burningham h.burningham@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 15550) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Helene,

Project (ref: 15550) “The importance of inlets and their tidal deltas on the sediment dynamics and flood and erosion risk management of low-lying coastal systems”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Andy Carter a.carter@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Andy,

Rebecca Briant has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Reconstructing multiple high sea level events in the Channel – the records from southwest England and south Wales (Ref: 15553)

Theme: Past Life & Environments
Supervisory Team: Rebecca Briant (Department of Geography, BBK), Gerald Roberts (Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, BBK)

Description:

Determining the age of raised beach sequences adjacent to the Channel is crucial in understanding the evolution of the landscape in this region, which has significant implications for the movement of hominins. Such sequences are hard to date reliably, although recent application of OSL dating shows promise where suitable material is available. The synchronous correlation approach, pioneered on rapidly uplifting coastlines, allows raised beach sequences with incomplete dating to be considered as a whole, providing age estimates even for sequences where direct dating is not possible, by using dated sequences as tie-points and knowledge of globally varying sea levels to predict which highstand events will be preserved. Recent application of this approach to the lower uplift rate coasts of Cotentin (France) and Sussex (England) has successfully suggested age estimates for previously enigmatic sequences. Further west within the Channel system, in southwest England and south Wales, there are multiple raised beach deposits of often uncertain age, that this approach could more effectively date. In this project, the student will digitally collate using a GIS published records from these beaches (including recent OSL dating by Matt Telfer in Plymouth [external co-supervisor]), undertake fieldwork on yet to be revisited sequences, use OSL dating (as a visitor in Plymouth) to date those sequences where suitable material is available and use the synchronous correlation approach to generate a new age model for this region.

Policy Impact:

This work will be of value to geologists and archaeologists interested in the co-evolution of landscape and human activity in this region.

Background Reading:
Gallagher C, Telfer MW & Ó Cofaigh C 2015 ‘A Marine Isotope Stage 4 age for Pleistocene raised beach deposits near Fethard, southern Ireland’ Journal of Quaternary Science 30, (8) 754-763
Telfer, M.W., Carr, A.S., Marshall, W.M., Boulton, S., Briant, R.M., Bates, M.R., Robinson, R.A. (in review). New data for an old problem: Raised beaches and associated deposits of southwestern and southern England, and implications for late Quaternary sea level. Quaternary Science Reviews.
Bates, M.R., Briant, R.M., Robertson, J., Schwenninger, J-L, and Whittaker, J.E. (in review). A complex MIS 5e highstand on the south coast of England: a new conceptual model of sequence preservation from slowly uplifting coastlines. Quaternary Science Reviews.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

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[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear ,

Rebecca Briant at BBK has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Gerald Roberts as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for BBK Department of Geography, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Gerald Roberts is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Reconstructing multiple high sea level events in the Channel – the records from southwest England and south Wales (Ref: 15553)

Theme: Past Life & Environments
Supervisory Team: Rebecca Briant (Department of Geography, BBK), Gerald Roberts (Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, BBK)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Andy Carter a.carter@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Andy,

Rebecca Briant submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 25/08/2017 at 11:25 am. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Reconstructing multiple high sea level events in the Channel – the records from southwest England and south Wales (Ref: 15553)

Theme: Past Life & Environments
Supervisory Team: Rebecca Briant (Department of Geography, BBK), Gerald Roberts (Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, BBK)

Description:

Determining the age of raised beach sequences adjacent to the Channel is crucial in understanding the evolution of the landscape in this region, which has significant implications for the movement of hominins. Such sequences are hard to date reliably, although recent application of OSL dating shows promise where suitable material is available. The synchronous correlation approach, pioneered on rapidly uplifting coastlines, allows raised beach sequences with incomplete dating to be considered as a whole, providing age estimates even for sequences where direct dating is not possible, by using dated sequences as tie-points and knowledge of globally varying sea levels to predict which highstand events will be preserved. Recent application of this approach to the lower uplift rate coasts of Cotentin (France) and Sussex (England) has successfully suggested age estimates for previously enigmatic sequences. Further west within the Channel system, in southwest England and south Wales, there are multiple raised beach deposits of often uncertain age, that this approach could more effectively date. In this project, the student will digitally collate using a GIS published records from these beaches (including recent OSL dating by Matt Telfer in Plymouth [external co-supervisor]), undertake fieldwork on yet to be revisited sequences, use OSL dating (as a visitor in Plymouth) to date those sequences where suitable material is available and use the synchronous correlation approach to generate a new age model for this region.

Policy Impact:

This work will be of value to geologists and archaeologists interested in the co-evolution of landscape and human activity in this region.

Background Reading:
Gallagher C, Telfer MW & Ó Cofaigh C 2015 ‘A Marine Isotope Stage 4 age for Pleistocene raised beach deposits near Fethard, southern Ireland’ Journal of Quaternary Science 30, (8) 754-763
Telfer, M.W., Carr, A.S., Marshall, W.M., Boulton, S., Briant, R.M., Bates, M.R., Robinson, R.A. (in review). New data for an old problem: Raised beaches and associated deposits of southwestern and southern England, and implications for late Quaternary sea level. Quaternary Science Reviews.
Bates, M.R., Briant, R.M., Robertson, J., Schwenninger, J-L, and Whittaker, J.E. (in review). A complex MIS 5e highstand on the south coast of England: a new conceptual model of sequence preservation from slowly uplifting coastlines. Quaternary Science Reviews.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear ,

Rebecca Briant submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 25/08/2017 at 11:25 am, listing Gerald Roberts as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Gerald Roberts is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Reconstructing multiple high sea level events in the Channel – the records from southwest England and south Wales (Ref: 15553)

Theme: Past Life & Environments
Supervisory Team: Rebecca Briant (Department of Geography, BBK), Gerald Roberts (Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, BBK)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Rebecca Briant b.briant@bbk.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Rebecca,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 24/09/2024.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Rebecca Briant b.briant@bbk.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Rebecca,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “Reconstructing multiple high sea level events in the Channel – the records from southwest England and south Wales” has not been updated since 25/09/2023. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 24/09/2024, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Rebecca Briant b.briant@bbk.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 15553) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Rebecca,

Project (ref: 15553) “Reconstructing multiple high sea level events in the Channel – the records from southwest England and south Wales”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Eileen Cox E.Cox@nhm.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Eileen,

Richard Twitchett has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Giants and dwarfs: body size, climate and extinction (Ref: 15554)

Theme: Evolution & Adaptation
Supervisory Team: Richard Twitchett (Earth Sciences Department, NHM), Bridget Wade (Earth Sciences, UCL)

Description:

This project focuses on examining the dynamics of size change in fossil marine organisms (macrofossils and/or microfossils) during environmental perturbations, particularly focusing on mass extinctions and episodes of climate change. It has long been recognized that the survivors of mass extinction events are smaller in size (the so-called Lilliput effect). This reduction in body size suggests an adaptive response to less favourable environmental conditions. A reduction in the size of marine animals is also a predicted consequence of present-day global warming, with implications for ecosystem function and productivity. Further detailed quantitative morphometric analyses, on expanded sedimentary sequences, are needed to establish the causes and consequences of size trends associated with extinction events. New digital morphometric techniques are now available that allow rapid documentation of size trends in multiple specimens throughout their ontogeny, which can then be compared with geochemical proxies of environmental change. Key lineages will be analyzed to document stratigraphic size trends at a variety of trophic levels in ancient marine ecosystems.

The student will be provided with a wide range of training including taxonomy, stratigraphy, morphometric analyses and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, the student will have the opportunity to undertake a variety of postgraduate training workshops at the NHM and UCL and will be encouraged to present their research at relevant UK and overseas conferences.

Policy Impact:

This project will provide fundamental insights into biotic response to environmental stress and has implications for size changes in the modern oceans in response to climatic change.

Background Reading:
Belben, R.A., Underwood, C.J., Johanson, Z. and Twitchett, R.J., 2017. Ecological impact of the end-Cretaceous extinction on lamniform sharks. PLoS ONE 12(6): e0178294.
Garilli, V., Rodolfo-Metalpa, R., Scuderi, D., Brusca, L., Parrinello, D., Rastrick, S.P.S., Foggo, A., Twitchett, R.J., Hall-Spencer, J.M. and Milazzo, M. 2015. Physiological advantages of dwarfing in surviving extinctions in high-CO2 oceans. Nature Climate Change 5: 678–682.
Wade, B.S. and Twitchett, R., 2009. Extinction, dwarfing and the Lilliput effect. In: Wade, B.S. and Twitchett, R. (Eds.). Extinction, Dwarfing and the Lilliput Effect. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, Special Issue, 284: 1-3.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To: Michel Tsamados m.tsamados@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Michel,

Richard Twitchett at NHM has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Bridget Wade as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for NHM Earth Sciences Department, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Bridget Wade is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Giants and dwarfs: body size, climate and extinction (Ref: 15554)

Theme: Evolution & Adaptation
Supervisory Team: Richard Twitchett (Earth Sciences Department, NHM), Bridget Wade (Earth Sciences, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Eileen Cox E.Cox@nhm.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Eileen,

Richard Twitchett submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 30/08/2017 at 1:30 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Giants and dwarfs: body size, climate and extinction (Ref: 15554)

Theme: Evolution & Adaptation
Supervisory Team: Richard Twitchett (Earth Sciences Department, NHM), Bridget Wade (Earth Sciences, UCL)

Description:

This project focuses on examining the dynamics of size change in fossil marine organisms (macrofossils and/or microfossils) during environmental perturbations, particularly focusing on mass extinctions and episodes of climate change. It has long been recognized that the survivors of mass extinction events are smaller in size (the so-called Lilliput effect). This reduction in body size suggests an adaptive response to less favourable environmental conditions. A reduction in the size of marine animals is also a predicted consequence of present-day global warming, with implications for ecosystem function and productivity. Further detailed quantitative morphometric analyses, on expanded sedimentary sequences, are needed to establish the causes and consequences of size trends associated with extinction events. New digital morphometric techniques are now available that allow rapid documentation of size trends in multiple specimens throughout their ontogeny, which can then be compared with geochemical proxies of environmental change. Key lineages will be analyzed to document stratigraphic size trends at a variety of trophic levels in ancient marine ecosystems.

The student will be provided with a wide range of training including taxonomy, stratigraphy, morphometric analyses and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, the student will have the opportunity to undertake a variety of postgraduate training workshops at the NHM and UCL and will be encouraged to present their research at relevant UK and overseas conferences.

Policy Impact:

This project will provide fundamental insights into biotic response to environmental stress and has implications for size changes in the modern oceans in response to climatic change.

Background Reading:
Belben, R.A., Underwood, C.J., Johanson, Z. and Twitchett, R.J., 2017. Ecological impact of the end-Cretaceous extinction on lamniform sharks. PLoS ONE 12(6): e0178294.
Garilli, V., Rodolfo-Metalpa, R., Scuderi, D., Brusca, L., Parrinello, D., Rastrick, S.P.S., Foggo, A., Twitchett, R.J., Hall-Spencer, J.M. and Milazzo, M. 2015. Physiological advantages of dwarfing in surviving extinctions in high-CO2 oceans. Nature Climate Change 5: 678–682.
Wade, B.S. and Twitchett, R., 2009. Extinction, dwarfing and the Lilliput effect. In: Wade, B.S. and Twitchett, R. (Eds.). Extinction, Dwarfing and the Lilliput Effect. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, Special Issue, 284: 1-3.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To: Michel Tsamados m.tsamados@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear Michel,

Richard Twitchett submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 30/08/2017 at 1:30 pm, listing Bridget Wade as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Bridget Wade is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Giants and dwarfs: body size, climate and extinction (Ref: 15554)

Theme: Evolution & Adaptation
Supervisory Team: Richard Twitchett (Earth Sciences Department, NHM), Bridget Wade (Earth Sciences, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Richard Twitchett r.twitchett@nhm.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Richard,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 24/09/2024.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Richard Twitchett r.twitchett@nhm.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Richard,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “Giants and dwarfs: body size, climate and extinction” has not been updated since 25/09/2023. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 24/09/2024, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Richard Twitchett r.twitchett@nhm.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 15554) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Richard,

Project (ref: 15554) “Giants and dwarfs: body size, climate and extinction”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Mark Trimmer m.trimmer@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Mark,

Lee Henry has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Do microbial mutualisms explain habitat specialisation in ants? (Ref: 15555)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Lee Henry (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL), Yannick Wurm (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL)

Description:

Background

Ants are among the most ecologically dominant organisms on earth. What is the secret their success?

It has been suggested that forming symbioses with nutrient-supplementing microbes may have contributed to their success, by allowing ants to invade otherwise inaccessible niches. For example, symbiosis with microbes that provide nutrients may have allowed ants to form specialized ant plant relationships (Myrmecophytes) and become specialist predators such as army ants.

However, it is currently unclear whether ants have repeatedly evolved symbioses that have allowed them to colonise and diversify in new ecological niches. In this PhD project, you will test the key hypothesis that symbioses have been are a major drivers of ecological success and diversification in ants, by enabling specialization and radiation into new ecological niches.

This project is suitable for students who wish to do field work on ants in the tropics (e.g. Fiji), as well as detailed mechanistic studies using a combination of experiments, and genomic investigations on lab cultured species.

This project has components that are more focused on ecology and behaviour, and those on genomics and evolution, or a combination of both. Students are encouraged to select a pathway that suits their current and future research plans.

*Students are also encouraged to develop their own ideas

Contact Dr. Henry directly to discuss details of the project.

Techniques

Field based experiments

Experimental manipulations

Molecular evolution

Comparative genomics

Metagenomics

Bioinformatics

Statistics (e.g. comparative phylogenetics)

**Technical skills developed will depend on the interests of the student

Policy Impact:

It is crucial to understand the mechanisms that lead to the success of organisms, as it influences diversification and invasiveness. This project will help determine the role of symbionts in the spread and dominance of ants. It will also provide insight to the genomic basis of symbiosis that allowed organisms to colonise the planet.

Background Reading:
Jackson R, Monnin D,… Henry LM (2022) Convergent evolution of a labile nutritional symbiosis in ants. ISME.
Jackson R, Henry LM, Wurm Y (2020) Evolution: The Legacy of Endosymbiosis in Ants . Current Biology vol. 30 , ( 22 ) R1385 – R1387 .
Cornwallis et al (2023) Symbioses shape feeding niches and diversification across insects. Nature Ecology and Evolution.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear ,

Lee Henry at QMUL has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Yannick Wurm as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for QMUL School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Yannick Wurm is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Do microbial mutualisms explain habitat specialisation in ants? (Ref: 15555)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Lee Henry (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL), Yannick Wurm (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Mark Trimmer m.trimmer@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Mark,

Lee Henry submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 05/09/2017 at 1:16 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Do microbial mutualisms explain habitat specialisation in ants? (Ref: 15555)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Lee Henry (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL), Yannick Wurm (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL)

Description:

Background

Ants are among the most ecologically dominant organisms on earth. What is the secret their success?

It has been suggested that forming symbioses with nutrient-supplementing microbes may have contributed to their success, by allowing ants to invade otherwise inaccessible niches. For example, symbiosis with microbes that provide nutrients may have allowed ants to form specialized ant plant relationships (Myrmecophytes) and become specialist predators such as army ants.

However, it is currently unclear whether ants have repeatedly evolved symbioses that have allowed them to colonise and diversify in new ecological niches. In this PhD project, you will test the key hypothesis that symbioses have been are a major drivers of ecological success and diversification in ants, by enabling specialization and radiation into new ecological niches.

This project is suitable for students who wish to do field work on ants in the tropics (e.g. Fiji), as well as detailed mechanistic studies using a combination of experiments, and genomic investigations on lab cultured species.

This project has components that are more focused on ecology and behaviour, and those on genomics and evolution, or a combination of both. Students are encouraged to select a pathway that suits their current and future research plans.

*Students are also encouraged to develop their own ideas

Contact Dr. Henry directly to discuss details of the project.

Techniques

Field based experiments

Experimental manipulations

Molecular evolution

Comparative genomics

Metagenomics

Bioinformatics

Statistics (e.g. comparative phylogenetics)

**Technical skills developed will depend on the interests of the student

Policy Impact:

It is crucial to understand the mechanisms that lead to the success of organisms, as it influences diversification and invasiveness. This project will help determine the role of symbionts in the spread and dominance of ants. It will also provide insight to the genomic basis of symbiosis that allowed organisms to colonise the planet.

Background Reading:
Jackson R, Monnin D,… Henry LM (2022) Convergent evolution of a labile nutritional symbiosis in ants. ISME.
Jackson R, Henry LM, Wurm Y (2020) Evolution: The Legacy of Endosymbiosis in Ants . Current Biology vol. 30 , ( 22 ) R1385 – R1387 .
Cornwallis et al (2023) Symbioses shape feeding niches and diversification across insects. Nature Ecology and Evolution.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear ,

Lee Henry submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 05/09/2017 at 1:16 pm, listing Yannick Wurm as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Yannick Wurm is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Do microbial mutualisms explain habitat specialisation in ants? (Ref: 15555)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Lee Henry (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL), Yannick Wurm (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Lee Henry l.henry@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Lee,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 10/09/2024.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Lee Henry l.henry@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Lee,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “Do microbial mutualisms explain habitat specialisation in ants?” has not been updated since 09/11/2023. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 10/09/2024, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Lee Henry l.henry@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 15555) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Lee,

Project (ref: 15555) “Do microbial mutualisms explain habitat specialisation in ants?”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Mark Trimmer m.trimmer@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Mark,

Laurent Frantz has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Developing the Role of Museum Collections in Mammalian Conservation Genomics: SE Asia as a Case Study (Ref: 15561)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Laurent Frantz (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL), Ian Barnes (Earth Sciences Department, NHM)

Description:

The collections held in natural history museums have the potential to make an important contribution to research in biological conservation and evolution. These collections are particularly important for regions where there have been recent major anthropogenic impacts, as specimens can enable us to directly assess the impact of any resulting environmental and ecological changes. However, museum material remains an underused source of information, despite recent developments in the recovery and analysis of both genetic (“museomics”) and morphometric information.

This project will use a “museomic” approach to better understand how recent anthropogenic changes have impacted on the genetic diversity of Island Southeast Asian mammalian species (e.g. Sulawesi, Borneo and Sumatra). More specifically, the student will generate and compare population genomic data from both contemporary individuals (wild and zoo), and museum specimens, in several species (e.g. Anoa, Tarsier, Babirussa, Orang-Utan etc.). In addition to training in the recovery and analysis of genetic data from museum specimens, it is anticipated that the student will have the opportunity to conduct off-site sampling in other museums, and potentially laboratory work in Indonesia.

Policy Impact:

The project aims to better develop a role for museum specimens as a source of data on long-term genomic and demographic change, as well as informing conservation policy in SE Asian mammals.

Background Reading:
Frantz, L.A.F. et al., 2018. Synchronous diversification of Sulawesi’s iconic artiodactyls driven by recent geological events. Proceedings. Biological sciences / The Royal Society, 285(1876).
Guschanski et al. 2013. Next-Generation Museomics Disentangles One of the Largest Primate Radiations. Systematic Biology 62(4): 539–554

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear ,

Laurent Frantz at QMUL has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Ian Barnes as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for QMUL School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Ian Barnes is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Developing the Role of Museum Collections in Mammalian Conservation Genomics: SE Asia as a Case Study (Ref: 15561)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Laurent Frantz (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL), Ian Barnes (Earth Sciences Department, NHM)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Mark Trimmer m.trimmer@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Mark,

Laurent Frantz submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 14/09/2017 at 12:31 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Developing the Role of Museum Collections in Mammalian Conservation Genomics: SE Asia as a Case Study (Ref: 15561)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Laurent Frantz (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL), Ian Barnes (Earth Sciences Department, NHM)

Description:

The collections held in natural history museums have the potential to make an important contribution to research in biological conservation and evolution. These collections are particularly important for regions where there have been recent major anthropogenic impacts, as specimens can enable us to directly assess the impact of any resulting environmental and ecological changes. However, museum material remains an underused source of information, despite recent developments in the recovery and analysis of both genetic (“museomics”) and morphometric information.

This project will use a “museomic” approach to better understand how recent anthropogenic changes have impacted on the genetic diversity of Island Southeast Asian mammalian species (e.g. Sulawesi, Borneo and Sumatra). More specifically, the student will generate and compare population genomic data from both contemporary individuals (wild and zoo), and museum specimens, in several species (e.g. Anoa, Tarsier, Babirussa, Orang-Utan etc.). In addition to training in the recovery and analysis of genetic data from museum specimens, it is anticipated that the student will have the opportunity to conduct off-site sampling in other museums, and potentially laboratory work in Indonesia.

Policy Impact:

The project aims to better develop a role for museum specimens as a source of data on long-term genomic and demographic change, as well as informing conservation policy in SE Asian mammals.

Background Reading:
Frantz, L.A.F. et al., 2018. Synchronous diversification of Sulawesi’s iconic artiodactyls driven by recent geological events. Proceedings. Biological sciences / The Royal Society, 285(1876).
Guschanski et al. 2013. Next-Generation Museomics Disentangles One of the Largest Primate Radiations. Systematic Biology 62(4): 539–554

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear ,

Laurent Frantz submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 14/09/2017 at 12:31 pm, listing Ian Barnes as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Ian Barnes is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Developing the Role of Museum Collections in Mammalian Conservation Genomics: SE Asia as a Case Study (Ref: 15561)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Laurent Frantz (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL), Ian Barnes (Earth Sciences Department, NHM)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Laurent Frantz laurent.frantz@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Laurent,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 05/06/2024.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Laurent Frantz laurent.frantz@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Laurent,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “Developing the Role of Museum Collections in Mammalian Conservation Genomics: SE Asia as a Case Study” has not been updated since 30/06/2021. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 05/06/2024, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Laurent Frantz laurent.frantz@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 15561) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Laurent,

Project (ref: 15561) “Developing the Role of Museum Collections in Mammalian Conservation Genomics: SE Asia as a Case Study”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Andrew Barry a.barry@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Andrew,

Mathias Disney has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

3D measurements to explain forest structure and function (Ref: 15570)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Mathias Disney (Geography, UCL), Philip Lewis (Geography, UCL)

Description:

How much does a tree weigh? And what about a forest? What makes a tree the size and shape it is? How does tree structure, the size, location and orientation of wood and leaf elements, interact with and/or shape environment to partition water, light and nutrients etc, to drive growth and development? Can we measure structure in detail and infer the relationship to larger-scale form and function? Can we relate detailed measurements to much larger-scale observations from aircraft and satellites via Earth Observation? These questions are extremely important and interesting aspects of individual tree, and forest growth, and determine, among other things, how much carbon trees can take up via photosynthesis, how they may respond to changing environments.

Fascinating new approaches to answering these questions are being opened up by detailed new 3D measurements from terrestrial laser scanning (TLS). Leading work on this is being done here at UCL, and a large dataset of observations across the tropics, temperate and other (eg urban) regions have been collected. This project will: exploit these data to explore and understand these relationships between form and function; test current theories relating form and function; develop new metrics to assess form and structure, within and between species and sites; exploit data from new satellites, aircraft and even drones. The work will involve wide collaboration with international colleagues. The project is suited to a candidate with a strong background in quantitative methods (physics, maths, engineering, computing etc) but also someone with a quantitative ecological background.

Policy Impact:

Understanding the function of trees is vital to predicting the response of forests to human impacts, including climate change, deforestation and degradation but also for quantifying biodiversity, habitat and resilience. These issues are central to important international policy initiatives (e.g. REDD+) and would be addressed by this project.

Background Reading:
Disney, M. I. (2018) Terrestrial LiDAR: a 3D revolution in how we look at trees
Burt, A., Boni Vicari, M., da Costa, A. C. L., Coughlin, I., Meir, P., Rowland, L. and Disney, M. I. (2021) New insights into large tropical tree mass and structure from direct harvest and terrestrial lidar, Royal Soc. Open Science, 18 (2),
Calders, K., Phinn, S., Ferrari, R., Leon, J., Asner, G. and Armston, J. and Disney, M. I. (2019) 3D imaging insights into forests and coral reefs, Trends in Ecology and Evolution,

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear ,

Mathias Disney at UCL has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Philip Lewis as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for UCL Geography, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Philip Lewis is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

3D measurements to explain forest structure and function (Ref: 15570)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Mathias Disney (Geography, UCL), Philip Lewis (Geography, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Andrew Barry a.barry@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Andrew,

Mathias Disney submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 05/10/2017 at 11:23 am. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

3D measurements to explain forest structure and function (Ref: 15570)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Mathias Disney (Geography, UCL), Philip Lewis (Geography, UCL)

Description:

How much does a tree weigh? And what about a forest? What makes a tree the size and shape it is? How does tree structure, the size, location and orientation of wood and leaf elements, interact with and/or shape environment to partition water, light and nutrients etc, to drive growth and development? Can we measure structure in detail and infer the relationship to larger-scale form and function? Can we relate detailed measurements to much larger-scale observations from aircraft and satellites via Earth Observation? These questions are extremely important and interesting aspects of individual tree, and forest growth, and determine, among other things, how much carbon trees can take up via photosynthesis, how they may respond to changing environments.

Fascinating new approaches to answering these questions are being opened up by detailed new 3D measurements from terrestrial laser scanning (TLS). Leading work on this is being done here at UCL, and a large dataset of observations across the tropics, temperate and other (eg urban) regions have been collected. This project will: exploit these data to explore and understand these relationships between form and function; test current theories relating form and function; develop new metrics to assess form and structure, within and between species and sites; exploit data from new satellites, aircraft and even drones. The work will involve wide collaboration with international colleagues. The project is suited to a candidate with a strong background in quantitative methods (physics, maths, engineering, computing etc) but also someone with a quantitative ecological background.

Policy Impact:

Understanding the function of trees is vital to predicting the response of forests to human impacts, including climate change, deforestation and degradation but also for quantifying biodiversity, habitat and resilience. These issues are central to important international policy initiatives (e.g. REDD+) and would be addressed by this project.

Background Reading:
Disney, M. I. (2018) Terrestrial LiDAR: a 3D revolution in how we look at trees
Burt, A., Boni Vicari, M., da Costa, A. C. L., Coughlin, I., Meir, P., Rowland, L. and Disney, M. I. (2021) New insights into large tropical tree mass and structure from direct harvest and terrestrial lidar, Royal Soc. Open Science, 18 (2),
Calders, K., Phinn, S., Ferrari, R., Leon, J., Asner, G. and Armston, J. and Disney, M. I. (2019) 3D imaging insights into forests and coral reefs, Trends in Ecology and Evolution,

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear ,

Mathias Disney submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 05/10/2017 at 11:23 am, listing Philip Lewis as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Philip Lewis is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

3D measurements to explain forest structure and function (Ref: 15570)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Mathias Disney (Geography, UCL), Philip Lewis (Geography, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Mathias Disney mathias.disney@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Mathias,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 10/09/2024.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Mathias Disney mathias.disney@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Mathias,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “3D measurements to explain forest structure and function” has not been updated since 11/09/2023. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 10/09/2024, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Mathias Disney mathias.disney@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 15570) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Mathias,

Project (ref: 15570) “3D measurements to explain forest structure and function”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Chris Carbone Chris.Carbone@zsl.org
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Chris,

Tom Letessier has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Where are the last strongholds of marine predators in the pelagic realm? (Ref: 15573)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Tom Letessier (Behavioural and Population Ecology Theme, IOZ), Christophe Eizaguirre (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL)

Description:

Marine predators such as sharks, tuna and billfish play unique and irreplaceable ecological roles. These roles include controlling trophic cascades, removing weak or diseased individuals, and translocating nutrients between habitats. Many populations of predators have experienced substantial declines since the 1950s, primary due to fishing, yet their distribution and abundance across diverse bathymetry and in relations to human density centres remain poorly understood. Protecting refuges – population and functional hotspots that persist in the face of extraction and other pressures – is therefore a key component of successful conservation and marine protected area implementation. Addressing this severe gap in knowledge, the PhD candidate will determine the environmental and socio-economical driving characteristic of marine predator refuges. The PhD candidate will be responsible for a mid-water (pelagic) baited remote underwater video systems (BRUVS) sampling programme targeting remote locations (Cape Verde, BIOT/Chagos, Caribbean, French Polynesia, New Caledonia), which still harbour rich predators populations, and which therefore may act as refuges. In addition, the candidate should expect to work with local NGO partners in order to assess the potential impact of existing spatial management regimes on pelagic species at the regional level. The ideal candidate will have experience with remote team-based field-work, and should have an strong interest in video-based sampling methodologies. Through a quantitative modelling framework the candidate will generate science with direct implication for conservation prioritisation. Particularly, the project will investigate predator sensitivity to future scenarios of human population growth and management strategies, thereby generating science directly applicable to policymakers and stakeholders.

Policy Impact:

There is considerable debate and controversy where to focus conservation efforts in the marine realm. Identifying the global drivers of marine predators refuges, and the impact of reserves will be a powerful tool for policy makers and stakeholders, with relevance for decision on 1) conservation prioritisation, and 2) marine protected area implementations.

Background Reading:
Drifting baited stereo-videography: a novel sampling tool for surveying pelagic wildlife in offshore marine reserves
Effects of a spatial closure on highly mobile fish species: an assessment using pelagic stereo-BRUVs
Bright spots among the world’s coral reefs

CASE Partner: Monaco Explorations ()

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To: Mark Trimmer m.trimmer@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Mark,

Tom Letessier at IOZ has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Christophe Eizaguirre as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for IOZ Behavioural and Population Ecology Theme, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Christophe Eizaguirre is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Where are the last strongholds of marine predators in the pelagic realm? (Ref: 15573)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Tom Letessier (Behavioural and Population Ecology Theme, IOZ), Christophe Eizaguirre (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Chris Carbone Chris.Carbone@zsl.org
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Chris,

Tom Letessier submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 10/10/2017 at 4:07 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Where are the last strongholds of marine predators in the pelagic realm? (Ref: 15573)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Tom Letessier (Behavioural and Population Ecology Theme, IOZ), Christophe Eizaguirre (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL)

Description:

Marine predators such as sharks, tuna and billfish play unique and irreplaceable ecological roles. These roles include controlling trophic cascades, removing weak or diseased individuals, and translocating nutrients between habitats. Many populations of predators have experienced substantial declines since the 1950s, primary due to fishing, yet their distribution and abundance across diverse bathymetry and in relations to human density centres remain poorly understood. Protecting refuges – population and functional hotspots that persist in the face of extraction and other pressures – is therefore a key component of successful conservation and marine protected area implementation. Addressing this severe gap in knowledge, the PhD candidate will determine the environmental and socio-economical driving characteristic of marine predator refuges. The PhD candidate will be responsible for a mid-water (pelagic) baited remote underwater video systems (BRUVS) sampling programme targeting remote locations (Cape Verde, BIOT/Chagos, Caribbean, French Polynesia, New Caledonia), which still harbour rich predators populations, and which therefore may act as refuges. In addition, the candidate should expect to work with local NGO partners in order to assess the potential impact of existing spatial management regimes on pelagic species at the regional level. The ideal candidate will have experience with remote team-based field-work, and should have an strong interest in video-based sampling methodologies. Through a quantitative modelling framework the candidate will generate science with direct implication for conservation prioritisation. Particularly, the project will investigate predator sensitivity to future scenarios of human population growth and management strategies, thereby generating science directly applicable to policymakers and stakeholders.

Policy Impact:

There is considerable debate and controversy where to focus conservation efforts in the marine realm. Identifying the global drivers of marine predators refuges, and the impact of reserves will be a powerful tool for policy makers and stakeholders, with relevance for decision on 1) conservation prioritisation, and 2) marine protected area implementations.

Background Reading:
Drifting baited stereo-videography: a novel sampling tool for surveying pelagic wildlife in offshore marine reserves
Effects of a spatial closure on highly mobile fish species: an assessment using pelagic stereo-BRUVs
Bright spots among the world’s coral reefs

CASE Partner: Monaco Explorations ()

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To: Mark Trimmer m.trimmer@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear Mark,

Tom Letessier submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 10/10/2017 at 4:07 pm, listing Christophe Eizaguirre as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Christophe Eizaguirre is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Where are the last strongholds of marine predators in the pelagic realm? (Ref: 15573)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Tom Letessier (Behavioural and Population Ecology Theme, IOZ), Christophe Eizaguirre (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Tom Letessier Tom.Letessier@IOZ.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Tom,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 02/10/2026.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Tom Letessier Tom.Letessier@IOZ.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Tom,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “Where are the last strongholds of marine predators in the pelagic realm?” has not been updated since 22/02/2024. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 02/10/2026, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Tom Letessier Tom.Letessier@IOZ.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 15573) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Tom,

Project (ref: 15573) “Where are the last strongholds of marine predators in the pelagic realm?”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Michel Tsamados m.tsamados@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Michel,

Philip Pogge Von Strandmann has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Constraining the glacial carbon cycle (Ref: 15574)

Theme: Past Life & Environments
Supervisory Team: Philip Pogge Von Strandmann (Earth Sciences, UCL)

Description:

CO2 is a primary player in controlling climates. However, especially the processes that naturally remove CO2 from the atmosphere are not well understood. One of the main processes is chemical weathering, but the rates at which it affects climate are relatively unknown. One of the primary time periods we use to inform model predictions of future climate change are the recent glacial-interglacials. However, we do not understand what controlled weathering, or by how much it affected CO2 on these timescales. This project will examine this in more detail, by using novel isotope techniques (primarily lithium isotopes) in speleothems, to determine local weathering records across different time periods. This will determine the controlling processes, ultimately of CO2 drawdown.

Policy Impact:

Understanding the controls on CO2 is clearly important for precise predictions of future climate change. This project aims to do exactly that, and provide better constraints for forward climate models.

Background Reading:
Pogge von Strandmann, P.A.E., Vaks, A., Bar-Matthews, M., Ayalon, A., Jacob, E., Henderson, G.M., Lithium isotopes in speleothems: Temperature-controlled variation in silicate weathering during glacial cycles, 2017, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 469: 64–74.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear ,

Philip Pogge Von Strandmann at UCL has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for UCL Earth Sciences, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Constraining the glacial carbon cycle (Ref: 15574)

Theme: Past Life & Environments
Supervisory Team: Philip Pogge Von Strandmann (Earth Sciences, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Michel Tsamados m.tsamados@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Michel,

Philip Pogge Von Strandmann submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 03/11/2017 at 3:58 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Constraining the glacial carbon cycle (Ref: 15574)

Theme: Past Life & Environments
Supervisory Team: Philip Pogge Von Strandmann (Earth Sciences, UCL)

Description:

CO2 is a primary player in controlling climates. However, especially the processes that naturally remove CO2 from the atmosphere are not well understood. One of the main processes is chemical weathering, but the rates at which it affects climate are relatively unknown. One of the primary time periods we use to inform model predictions of future climate change are the recent glacial-interglacials. However, we do not understand what controlled weathering, or by how much it affected CO2 on these timescales. This project will examine this in more detail, by using novel isotope techniques (primarily lithium isotopes) in speleothems, to determine local weathering records across different time periods. This will determine the controlling processes, ultimately of CO2 drawdown.

Policy Impact:

Understanding the controls on CO2 is clearly important for precise predictions of future climate change. This project aims to do exactly that, and provide better constraints for forward climate models.

Background Reading:
Pogge von Strandmann, P.A.E., Vaks, A., Bar-Matthews, M., Ayalon, A., Jacob, E., Henderson, G.M., Lithium isotopes in speleothems: Temperature-controlled variation in silicate weathering during glacial cycles, 2017, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 469: 64–74.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear ,

Philip Pogge Von Strandmann submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 03/11/2017 at 3:58 pm, listing as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Constraining the glacial carbon cycle (Ref: 15574)

Theme: Past Life & Environments
Supervisory Team: Philip Pogge Von Strandmann (Earth Sciences, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Philip Pogge Von Strandmann p.strandmann@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Philip,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 03/11/2018.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Philip Pogge Von Strandmann p.strandmann@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Philip,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “Constraining the glacial carbon cycle” has not been updated since 03/11/2017. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 03/11/2018, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Philip Pogge Von Strandmann p.strandmann@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 15574) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Philip,

Project (ref: 15574) “Constraining the glacial carbon cycle”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Tom Mitchell tom.mitchell@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Tom,

John Brodholt has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

The deep nitrogen cycle – nitrogen storage in the subduction system (Ref: 15590)

Theme: Solid Earth Dynamics
Supervisory Team: John Brodholt (Earth Sciences, UCL), Andrew Thomson (Earth Sciences, UCL)

Description:

Nitrogen forms an integral part of the main building blocks of life, including DNA, RNA, and proteins. N2 is the dominant gas in Earth’s atmosphere, and nitrogen is likely stored in all of Earth’s geological reservoirs, including the crust, the mantle, and the core. After the subduction of organic matter stored on the ocean-floor nitrogen has normally been assumed to behave like the noble gases during mantle processes, an unreactive and incompatible gas phase. However, empirical data suggest that nitrogen may exist in many forms throughout mantle conditions. Since Earth is a dynamic planet, with active plate tectonics, the relative efficiency of nitrogen in-gassing (subduction) and outgassing (volcanoes) will control surface and mantle nitrogen reservoirs on geological timescales, therefore influencing the ability of our planet to develop and sustain a stable life-supporting atmosphere. Understanding the speciation, compatibility and behaviour of nitrogen through the subduction cycle is of critical importance to understanding the evolution of planet Earth as we know it today.

This Ph.D. project will provide the opportunity to explore the transport and storage of nitrogen in mantle phases throughout the entire subduction system, from ocean-floor to the upper/lower mantle boundary region. The Ph.D. would be completed in the high-pressure labs at UCL, using a combination of experimental techniques in collaboration with St Andrews University. Throughout the project there will be opportunities for the student to visit analytical labs and large national facilities (e.g. synchrotron and neutron sources) in the UK, Europe, USA and Japan depending on project requirements.

Policy Impact:

Nitrogen is hugely important to life. Studying volatile storage and degassing into and from the mantle will help us understand the origins and maintenance of life on planet Earth throughout its history.

Background Reading:
The origins and concentrations of water, carbon, nitrogen and noble gases on Earth
Nitrogen speciation in upper mantle fluids and the origin of Earth’s nitrogen-rich atmosphere
The geobiological nitrogen cycle: From microbes to the mantle

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear ,

John Brodholt at UCL has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Andrew Thomson as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for UCL Earth Sciences, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Andrew Thomson is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

The deep nitrogen cycle – nitrogen storage in the subduction system (Ref: 15590)

Theme: Solid Earth Dynamics
Supervisory Team: John Brodholt (Earth Sciences, UCL), Andrew Thomson (Earth Sciences, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Tom Mitchell tom.mitchell@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Tom,

John Brodholt submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 23/11/2017 at 5:54 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

The deep nitrogen cycle – nitrogen storage in the subduction system (Ref: 15590)

Theme: Solid Earth Dynamics
Supervisory Team: John Brodholt (Earth Sciences, UCL), Andrew Thomson (Earth Sciences, UCL)

Description:

Nitrogen forms an integral part of the main building blocks of life, including DNA, RNA, and proteins. N2 is the dominant gas in Earth’s atmosphere, and nitrogen is likely stored in all of Earth’s geological reservoirs, including the crust, the mantle, and the core. After the subduction of organic matter stored on the ocean-floor nitrogen has normally been assumed to behave like the noble gases during mantle processes, an unreactive and incompatible gas phase. However, empirical data suggest that nitrogen may exist in many forms throughout mantle conditions. Since Earth is a dynamic planet, with active plate tectonics, the relative efficiency of nitrogen in-gassing (subduction) and outgassing (volcanoes) will control surface and mantle nitrogen reservoirs on geological timescales, therefore influencing the ability of our planet to develop and sustain a stable life-supporting atmosphere. Understanding the speciation, compatibility and behaviour of nitrogen through the subduction cycle is of critical importance to understanding the evolution of planet Earth as we know it today.

This Ph.D. project will provide the opportunity to explore the transport and storage of nitrogen in mantle phases throughout the entire subduction system, from ocean-floor to the upper/lower mantle boundary region. The Ph.D. would be completed in the high-pressure labs at UCL, using a combination of experimental techniques in collaboration with St Andrews University. Throughout the project there will be opportunities for the student to visit analytical labs and large national facilities (e.g. synchrotron and neutron sources) in the UK, Europe, USA and Japan depending on project requirements.

Policy Impact:

Nitrogen is hugely important to life. Studying volatile storage and degassing into and from the mantle will help us understand the origins and maintenance of life on planet Earth throughout its history.

Background Reading:
The origins and concentrations of water, carbon, nitrogen and noble gases on Earth
Nitrogen speciation in upper mantle fluids and the origin of Earth’s nitrogen-rich atmosphere
The geobiological nitrogen cycle: From microbes to the mantle

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear ,

John Brodholt submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 23/11/2017 at 5:54 pm, listing Andrew Thomson as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Andrew Thomson is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

The deep nitrogen cycle – nitrogen storage in the subduction system (Ref: 15590)

Theme: Solid Earth Dynamics
Supervisory Team: John Brodholt (Earth Sciences, UCL), Andrew Thomson (Earth Sciences, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: John Brodholt j.brodholt@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear John,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 24/09/2024.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: John Brodholt j.brodholt@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear John,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “The deep nitrogen cycle – nitrogen storage in the subduction system” has not been updated since 25/09/2023. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 24/09/2024, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: John Brodholt j.brodholt@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 15590) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear John,

Project (ref: 15590) “The deep nitrogen cycle – nitrogen storage in the subduction system”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Andrew Pomiankowski a.pomiankowski@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Andrew,

Jürg Bähler has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

The evolution of environmental plasticity (Ref: 15597)

Theme: Evolution & Adaptation
Supervisory Team: Jürg Bähler (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL), Max Reuter (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL)

Description:

Virtually all living organisms are able to buffer environmental fluctuations by altering their physiology, morphology or behaviour in response to external conditions. These plastic responses are essential for organisms to cope with a variable environment and are likely to play a vital role in their response to rapid climate change.

In addition to its important ecological function, plasticity also relates directly to one of the core questions of contemporary biological research: how does the genotype determine the phenotype? Because plastic phenotypes are expressed by an individual, in the absence of genetic change, they necessarily rely on changes in gene expression. Studying plasticity therefore provides a window to understanding the principles of gene regulation, the evolutionary forces that have given rise to it, and the genetic constraints that shape it.

This PhD investigates the emergence of novel gene regulation in response to fluctuating environments. The project will use fission yeast, a model organism that offers powerful molecular and genetic techniques to manipulate and analyse gene regulation under tightly controlled conditions. We will use the fission yeast system to investigate a wide range of questions, focussing on molecular, evolutionary or ecological questions, as exemplified below. What are the evolutionary dynamics of gene regulation, and how are they shaped by selection and mutational input? How are new genes integrated into regulatory networks? What is the relationship between regulation and expression noise? What is the relative contribution of cis- and trans-effects to novel regulation? What ecological conditions favour plastic gene regulation?

Policy Impact:

Phenotypic plasticity is an essential mechanism for populations to deal with climate change. Yet, we have little empirical evidence for how past environments and population history shape plasticity and/or genetic variation for either fixed or plastic environmental responses. This project will fill this essential gap.

Background Reading:
Lopez-Maury, Marguerat & Bahler (2008) Tuning gene expression to changing environments: from rapid responses to evolutionary adaptation. Nat Rev Genet 9:583-593.
Chevin et al. (2010) Adaptation, Plasticity, and Extinction in a Changing Environment: Towards a Predictive Theory. PloS Biol 8:e1000357.
Reuter et al. (2017) Evolving Plastic Responses to External and Genetic Environments. Trend Genet. 33:169-170.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear ,

Jürg Bähler at UCL has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Max Reuter as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for UCL Genetics, Evolution and Environment, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Max Reuter is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

The evolution of environmental plasticity (Ref: 15597)

Theme: Evolution & Adaptation
Supervisory Team: Jürg Bähler (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL), Max Reuter (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Andrew Pomiankowski a.pomiankowski@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Andrew,

Jürg Bähler submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 05/02/2018 at 5:55 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

The evolution of environmental plasticity (Ref: 15597)

Theme: Evolution & Adaptation
Supervisory Team: Jürg Bähler (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL), Max Reuter (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL)

Description:

Virtually all living organisms are able to buffer environmental fluctuations by altering their physiology, morphology or behaviour in response to external conditions. These plastic responses are essential for organisms to cope with a variable environment and are likely to play a vital role in their response to rapid climate change.

In addition to its important ecological function, plasticity also relates directly to one of the core questions of contemporary biological research: how does the genotype determine the phenotype? Because plastic phenotypes are expressed by an individual, in the absence of genetic change, they necessarily rely on changes in gene expression. Studying plasticity therefore provides a window to understanding the principles of gene regulation, the evolutionary forces that have given rise to it, and the genetic constraints that shape it.

This PhD investigates the emergence of novel gene regulation in response to fluctuating environments. The project will use fission yeast, a model organism that offers powerful molecular and genetic techniques to manipulate and analyse gene regulation under tightly controlled conditions. We will use the fission yeast system to investigate a wide range of questions, focussing on molecular, evolutionary or ecological questions, as exemplified below. What are the evolutionary dynamics of gene regulation, and how are they shaped by selection and mutational input? How are new genes integrated into regulatory networks? What is the relationship between regulation and expression noise? What is the relative contribution of cis- and trans-effects to novel regulation? What ecological conditions favour plastic gene regulation?

Policy Impact:

Phenotypic plasticity is an essential mechanism for populations to deal with climate change. Yet, we have little empirical evidence for how past environments and population history shape plasticity and/or genetic variation for either fixed or plastic environmental responses. This project will fill this essential gap.

Background Reading:
Lopez-Maury, Marguerat & Bahler (2008) Tuning gene expression to changing environments: from rapid responses to evolutionary adaptation. Nat Rev Genet 9:583-593.
Chevin et al. (2010) Adaptation, Plasticity, and Extinction in a Changing Environment: Towards a Predictive Theory. PloS Biol 8:e1000357.
Reuter et al. (2017) Evolving Plastic Responses to External and Genetic Environments. Trend Genet. 33:169-170.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear ,

Jürg Bähler submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 05/02/2018 at 5:55 pm, listing Max Reuter as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Max Reuter is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

The evolution of environmental plasticity (Ref: 15597)

Theme: Evolution & Adaptation
Supervisory Team: Jürg Bähler (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL), Max Reuter (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Jürg Bähler j.bahler@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Jürg,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 28/02/2024.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Jürg Bähler j.bahler@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Jürg,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “The evolution of environmental plasticity” has not been updated since 28/02/2023. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 28/02/2024, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Jürg Bähler j.bahler@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 15597) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Jürg,

Project (ref: 15597) “The evolution of environmental plasticity”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Eileen Cox E.Cox@nhm.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Eileen,

David Gower has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Diversity and diversification of Asian caecilians amphibians (Ref: 15599)

Theme: Evolution & Adaptation
Supervisory Team: David Gower (Life Sciences Department, NHM)

Description:

Caecilian amphibians (Gymnophiona) comprise ca. 205 extant species that are the product of probably >250 million years of evolution. Approximately 75 species in three families (two of which are endemic) occur in Asia and have been argued to have arrived there by rafting on the Indian plate during the breakup of Gondwana. Many questions surround the diversity and diversification of Asian caecilians, including: how many taxa are there?; how and when did they disperse out of India into southeast Asia?; what can Asian caecilians tell us about Asian biogeography?; what is the reproductive and early life history diversity of Asian caecilians and how did it evolve?; did Asian caecilians undergo (non-)adaptive radiations?

This comparative evolutionary biology project will use a diversity of techniques to generate morphological and molecular data on multiple major lineages of Asian caecilians. These new data will be combined with other available information and used to test hypotheses about patterns of diversity at different spatial and temporal scales, and about processes of diversification.

The project is novel and interdisciplinary and the student will receive training in a range of techniques likely including several of: anatomy, morphological and molecular systematics (data generation and analysis), absolute and relative molecular dating, museology, macroecology/evolution, microCT scanning, X-ray, R, phylogeography, alpha-level taxonomy, phylogenetics, biogeography, clade diversification analysis and, potentially, fieldwork.

Policy Impact:

New insights will be made into Asian caecilian diversity and diversification. The new data will inform debates about the evolutionary history of Asian vertebrates, and will generate results relevant to conservation assessments. The study taxa, range of methods, and spatial and temporal scale make the study ideal for public engagement.

Background Reading:
Gower, D.J. et al. (2002) A molecular phylogeny of ichthyophiid caecilians (Amphibia: Gymnophiona: Ichthyophiidae): Out of India or out of southeast Asia? Proceedings of the Royal Society B 269: 1563-1569.
Nishikawa, K. et al. (2012) Molecular phylogeny and biogeography of caecilians from Southeast Asia (Amphibia: Gymnophiona: Ichthyophiidae), with special reference to high cryptic species diversity in Sundaland. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 63: 714-723.
Sherratt, E. et al. (2014) Evolution of cranial shape in caecilians (Amphibia: Gymnophiona). Evolutionary Biology. 41: 528-545.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear ,

David Gower at NHM has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for NHM Life Sciences Department, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Diversity and diversification of Asian caecilians amphibians (Ref: 15599)

Theme: Evolution & Adaptation
Supervisory Team: David Gower (Life Sciences Department, NHM)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Eileen Cox E.Cox@nhm.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Eileen,

David Gower submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 05/02/2018 at 6:42 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Diversity and diversification of Asian caecilians amphibians (Ref: 15599)

Theme: Evolution & Adaptation
Supervisory Team: David Gower (Life Sciences Department, NHM)

Description:

Caecilian amphibians (Gymnophiona) comprise ca. 205 extant species that are the product of probably >250 million years of evolution. Approximately 75 species in three families (two of which are endemic) occur in Asia and have been argued to have arrived there by rafting on the Indian plate during the breakup of Gondwana. Many questions surround the diversity and diversification of Asian caecilians, including: how many taxa are there?; how and when did they disperse out of India into southeast Asia?; what can Asian caecilians tell us about Asian biogeography?; what is the reproductive and early life history diversity of Asian caecilians and how did it evolve?; did Asian caecilians undergo (non-)adaptive radiations?

This comparative evolutionary biology project will use a diversity of techniques to generate morphological and molecular data on multiple major lineages of Asian caecilians. These new data will be combined with other available information and used to test hypotheses about patterns of diversity at different spatial and temporal scales, and about processes of diversification.

The project is novel and interdisciplinary and the student will receive training in a range of techniques likely including several of: anatomy, morphological and molecular systematics (data generation and analysis), absolute and relative molecular dating, museology, macroecology/evolution, microCT scanning, X-ray, R, phylogeography, alpha-level taxonomy, phylogenetics, biogeography, clade diversification analysis and, potentially, fieldwork.

Policy Impact:

New insights will be made into Asian caecilian diversity and diversification. The new data will inform debates about the evolutionary history of Asian vertebrates, and will generate results relevant to conservation assessments. The study taxa, range of methods, and spatial and temporal scale make the study ideal for public engagement.

Background Reading:
Gower, D.J. et al. (2002) A molecular phylogeny of ichthyophiid caecilians (Amphibia: Gymnophiona: Ichthyophiidae): Out of India or out of southeast Asia? Proceedings of the Royal Society B 269: 1563-1569.
Nishikawa, K. et al. (2012) Molecular phylogeny and biogeography of caecilians from Southeast Asia (Amphibia: Gymnophiona: Ichthyophiidae), with special reference to high cryptic species diversity in Sundaland. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 63: 714-723.
Sherratt, E. et al. (2014) Evolution of cranial shape in caecilians (Amphibia: Gymnophiona). Evolutionary Biology. 41: 528-545.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear ,

David Gower submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 05/02/2018 at 6:42 pm, listing as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Diversity and diversification of Asian caecilians amphibians (Ref: 15599)

Theme: Evolution & Adaptation
Supervisory Team: David Gower (Life Sciences Department, NHM)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: David Gower d.gower@nhm.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear David,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 05/02/2019.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: David Gower d.gower@nhm.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear David,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “Diversity and diversification of Asian caecilians amphibians” has not been updated since 05/02/2018. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 05/02/2019, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: David Gower d.gower@nhm.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 15599) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear David,

Project (ref: 15599) “Diversity and diversification of Asian caecilians amphibians”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Michel Tsamados m.tsamados@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Michel,

Michel Tsamados has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Data fusion of 20 years of polar remote sensing data: emerging climate trends? (Ref: 15600)

Theme: Earth, Atmosphere & Ocean Processes
Supervisory Team: Michel Tsamados (Earth Sciences, UCL), Julienne Stroeve (Earth Sciences, UCL)

Description:

The UK has led the polar remote sensing field for over four decades. The Centre for Polar Observation and Modelling at UCL has been at the forefront of this research (i.e. polar mission CryoSat-2) over the last two decades. The unparalleled success of the SAR CryoSat-2 radar altimeter mission in delivering the most accurate to date picture of the sea ice thickness and polar ocean dynamic topography over the last eight years has revolutionised the way we understand the polar regions. In the Arctic this means that we now understand by how much the total volume of ice has diminished and what impact this has had on the underlying ‘dormant’ Arctic Ocean.

In this study you will use machine learning tools to perform data fusion in time and space of the wide range of satellite, airborne and in-situ data collected in the polar regions over the past two decades to build a statistically robust picture of the trends in the key climate variables: 1) the total sea ice volume and 2) the high latitudes ocean dynamic topography (and currents).

Your role will be to cross-calibrate and refine our current processing of past and present radar and laser altimeter satellite data (with other remote sensing and in-situ data proxies) from the early 1990s (ERS), through the 2000s (ENVISAT), and up to the 2020s (CryoSat-2, AltiKa, Sentinel-3, ICESat-2. These multi-decadal time series will inform our understanding of the long-term changes that are emerging in the polar regions and their implications for our mid-latitudes.

Policy Impact:

This work is central to the NERC mission to conduct world-class research in the polar sciences with focus on developing a wider understanding of processes contributing to Arctic and Antarctic change. In addition to the cutting edge science in polar remote sensing this project will have a strong climate policy component as you will inform decision makers of the state of the polar regions based on newly developed regional climate metrics as part of long-standing collaborations with the Met Office.

Background Reading:
Tsamados, M. 2017, Are we waking up the sleeping Arctic Ocean, UCL Lunch Hour Lecture
Martin, T., Tsamados, M., Schroeder, D., & Feltham, D. (2016). The impact of variable sea ice roughness on changes in Arctic Ocean surface stress: A model study. Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans, 121(3), 1931-1952.
Data Science for Climate and the Environment workshop co-organised by Michel Tsamados at the Alan Turing Institute March 26th 2018

CASE Partner: The Met Office (https://www.metoffice.gov.uk/)

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear ,

Michel Tsamados at UCL has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Julienne Stroeve as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for UCL Earth Sciences, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Julienne Stroeve is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Data fusion of 20 years of polar remote sensing data: emerging climate trends? (Ref: 15600)

Theme: Earth, Atmosphere & Ocean Processes
Supervisory Team: Michel Tsamados (Earth Sciences, UCL), Julienne Stroeve (Earth Sciences, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Michel Tsamados m.tsamados@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Michel,

Michel Tsamados submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 05/02/2018 at 7:06 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Data fusion of 20 years of polar remote sensing data: emerging climate trends? (Ref: 15600)

Theme: Earth, Atmosphere & Ocean Processes
Supervisory Team: Michel Tsamados (Earth Sciences, UCL), Julienne Stroeve (Earth Sciences, UCL)

Description:

The UK has led the polar remote sensing field for over four decades. The Centre for Polar Observation and Modelling at UCL has been at the forefront of this research (i.e. polar mission CryoSat-2) over the last two decades. The unparalleled success of the SAR CryoSat-2 radar altimeter mission in delivering the most accurate to date picture of the sea ice thickness and polar ocean dynamic topography over the last eight years has revolutionised the way we understand the polar regions. In the Arctic this means that we now understand by how much the total volume of ice has diminished and what impact this has had on the underlying ‘dormant’ Arctic Ocean.

In this study you will use machine learning tools to perform data fusion in time and space of the wide range of satellite, airborne and in-situ data collected in the polar regions over the past two decades to build a statistically robust picture of the trends in the key climate variables: 1) the total sea ice volume and 2) the high latitudes ocean dynamic topography (and currents).

Your role will be to cross-calibrate and refine our current processing of past and present radar and laser altimeter satellite data (with other remote sensing and in-situ data proxies) from the early 1990s (ERS), through the 2000s (ENVISAT), and up to the 2020s (CryoSat-2, AltiKa, Sentinel-3, ICESat-2. These multi-decadal time series will inform our understanding of the long-term changes that are emerging in the polar regions and their implications for our mid-latitudes.

Policy Impact:

This work is central to the NERC mission to conduct world-class research in the polar sciences with focus on developing a wider understanding of processes contributing to Arctic and Antarctic change. In addition to the cutting edge science in polar remote sensing this project will have a strong climate policy component as you will inform decision makers of the state of the polar regions based on newly developed regional climate metrics as part of long-standing collaborations with the Met Office.

Background Reading:
Tsamados, M. 2017, Are we waking up the sleeping Arctic Ocean, UCL Lunch Hour Lecture
Martin, T., Tsamados, M., Schroeder, D., & Feltham, D. (2016). The impact of variable sea ice roughness on changes in Arctic Ocean surface stress: A model study. Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans, 121(3), 1931-1952.
Data Science for Climate and the Environment workshop co-organised by Michel Tsamados at the Alan Turing Institute March 26th 2018

CASE Partner: The Met Office (https://www.metoffice.gov.uk/)

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear ,

Michel Tsamados submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 05/02/2018 at 7:06 pm, listing Julienne Stroeve as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Julienne Stroeve is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Data fusion of 20 years of polar remote sensing data: emerging climate trends? (Ref: 15600)

Theme: Earth, Atmosphere & Ocean Processes
Supervisory Team: Michel Tsamados (Earth Sciences, UCL), Julienne Stroeve (Earth Sciences, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Michel Tsamados m.tsamados@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Michel,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 28/02/2024.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Michel Tsamados m.tsamados@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Michel,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “Data fusion of 20 years of polar remote sensing data: emerging climate trends?” has not been updated since 28/02/2023. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 28/02/2024, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Michel Tsamados m.tsamados@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 15600) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Michel,

Project (ref: 15600) “Data fusion of 20 years of polar remote sensing data: emerging climate trends?”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Tania Monteiro t.monteiro@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Tania,

Jonathan Tennyson has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Molecular absorptions in the atmosphere of the early Earth (Ref: 15609)

Theme: Earth, Atmosphere & Ocean Processes
Supervisory Team: Jonathan Tennyson (Physics and Astronomy, UCL), Sergey Yurchenko (Physics and Astronomy, UCL)

Description:

The atmosphere of the early Earth was very different from that we find about us today. It was both hotter and contained a very different mix of chemicals. To understand the processes that shaped the current atmosphere and climate of the Earth, it is important to understand how the molecules in the primordial atmosphere absorbed and emitted light over a whole range of wavelengths (from infrared to ultraviolet). Interestingly a new discovered class of extra-solar planets (exoplanets) known as super Earths appear to have atmospheres similar to that believed to be present in the early Earth, raising the possibility that such atmospheres can be directly studied. Studying these exoplanets or modelling the early Earth requires significant quantities of laboratory spectroscopic data characterising the radiative processes involved for each molecule as a function of temperature. The ExoMol project was founded to provide exactly this sort of information which is provided by quantum mechanical calculations on a molecule-by-molecule basis. The proposed project will involve the calculation of line lists for key early Earth molecules and testing these against available laboratory measurements. The resulting data will be passed to modellers. The ExoMol project has recently been renewed by the ERC and you will join a team working a range of similar problems.

Policy Impact:

All data will be made available via the ExoMol website and key atmospheric data bases such as HITRAN and GEISA.

Background Reading:
J. Tennyson and S. N. Yurchenko, Laboratory spectra of hot molecules: data needs for hot super-Earth exoplanets, Mol. Astrophys., 8, 1-18 (2017),

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear ,

Jonathan Tennyson at UCL has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Sergey Yurchenko as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for UCL Physics and Astronomy, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Sergey Yurchenko is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Molecular absorptions in the atmosphere of the early Earth (Ref: 15609)

Theme: Earth, Atmosphere & Ocean Processes
Supervisory Team: Jonathan Tennyson (Physics and Astronomy, UCL), Sergey Yurchenko (Physics and Astronomy, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Tania Monteiro t.monteiro@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Tania,

Jonathan Tennyson submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 24/06/2018 at 9:40 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Molecular absorptions in the atmosphere of the early Earth (Ref: 15609)

Theme: Earth, Atmosphere & Ocean Processes
Supervisory Team: Jonathan Tennyson (Physics and Astronomy, UCL), Sergey Yurchenko (Physics and Astronomy, UCL)

Description:

The atmosphere of the early Earth was very different from that we find about us today. It was both hotter and contained a very different mix of chemicals. To understand the processes that shaped the current atmosphere and climate of the Earth, it is important to understand how the molecules in the primordial atmosphere absorbed and emitted light over a whole range of wavelengths (from infrared to ultraviolet). Interestingly a new discovered class of extra-solar planets (exoplanets) known as super Earths appear to have atmospheres similar to that believed to be present in the early Earth, raising the possibility that such atmospheres can be directly studied. Studying these exoplanets or modelling the early Earth requires significant quantities of laboratory spectroscopic data characterising the radiative processes involved for each molecule as a function of temperature. The ExoMol project was founded to provide exactly this sort of information which is provided by quantum mechanical calculations on a molecule-by-molecule basis. The proposed project will involve the calculation of line lists for key early Earth molecules and testing these against available laboratory measurements. The resulting data will be passed to modellers. The ExoMol project has recently been renewed by the ERC and you will join a team working a range of similar problems.

Policy Impact:

All data will be made available via the ExoMol website and key atmospheric data bases such as HITRAN and GEISA.

Background Reading:
J. Tennyson and S. N. Yurchenko, Laboratory spectra of hot molecules: data needs for hot super-Earth exoplanets, Mol. Astrophys., 8, 1-18 (2017),

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear ,

Jonathan Tennyson submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 24/06/2018 at 9:40 pm, listing Sergey Yurchenko as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Sergey Yurchenko is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Molecular absorptions in the atmosphere of the early Earth (Ref: 15609)

Theme: Earth, Atmosphere & Ocean Processes
Supervisory Team: Jonathan Tennyson (Physics and Astronomy, UCL), Sergey Yurchenko (Physics and Astronomy, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Jonathan Tennyson j.tennyson@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Jonathan,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 08/11/2024.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Jonathan Tennyson j.tennyson@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Jonathan,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “Molecular absorptions in the atmosphere of the early Earth” has not been updated since 11/09/2023. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 08/11/2024, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Jonathan Tennyson j.tennyson@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 15609) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Jonathan,

Project (ref: 15609) “Molecular absorptions in the atmosphere of the early Earth”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Andrew Pomiankowski a.pomiankowski@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Andrew,

Kate Jones has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Understanding the response of disease vectors to land-use change (Ref: 15610)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Kate Jones (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL), Tim Newbold (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL)

Description:

The natural world is changing rapidly: It is expected that by 2100, mean temperatures will rise by 4 degrees, 450 million hectares of forest will be lost and the human population will reach 11.2 billion. It is estimated that nearly half the world’s human population is infected with least one pathogen carried by invertebrate vector species, causing an immense daily burden and re-enforcing cycles of poverty. Climate and land-use change will have a major impact on disease-carrying species over the coming decades. However, our understanding of how biodiversity and in particular vector species respond to global change is limited. This project aims to understand and predict the response of vector species to global change drivers. Following on from the methods used in the Projecting Responses of Ecological Diversity In Changing Terrestrial Systems (PREDICTS) project, this PhD will for the first time, gather empirical evidence to uncover global patterns of vector and non-vector invertebrate community responses to land-use change and other global change drivers. The project would involve using machine learning analytics to gather data from literature and other primary data sources to generate spatial and temporal models of how vector abundances and distributions respond to current and future environmental variables.

Policy Impact:

Diseases transmitted by arthropod vectors such as mosquitoes, ticks and midges are major contributors to the global burden of infectious disease. Understanding the interplay between environmental and socioeconomic factors at different spatial scales within a changing climate is essential for the successful management of disease risk in the future.

Background Reading:
Newbold, T. et al. Global effects of land use on local terrestrial biodiversity. Nature 520, 45 (2015).
Newbold, T. Future effects of climate and land-use change on terrestrial vertebrate community diversity under different scenarios. Proc. R. Soc. B 285, 20180792 (2018).
Olival et al. Host and viral traits predict zoonotic spillover from mammals. Nature 546: 646-650

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear ,

Kate Jones at UCL has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Tim Newbold as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for UCL Genetics, Evolution and Environment, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Tim Newbold is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Understanding the response of disease vectors to land-use change (Ref: 15610)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Kate Jones (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL), Tim Newbold (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Andrew Pomiankowski a.pomiankowski@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Andrew,

Kate Jones submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 06/07/2018 at 11:31 am. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Understanding the response of disease vectors to land-use change (Ref: 15610)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Kate Jones (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL), Tim Newbold (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL)

Description:

The natural world is changing rapidly: It is expected that by 2100, mean temperatures will rise by 4 degrees, 450 million hectares of forest will be lost and the human population will reach 11.2 billion. It is estimated that nearly half the world’s human population is infected with least one pathogen carried by invertebrate vector species, causing an immense daily burden and re-enforcing cycles of poverty. Climate and land-use change will have a major impact on disease-carrying species over the coming decades. However, our understanding of how biodiversity and in particular vector species respond to global change is limited. This project aims to understand and predict the response of vector species to global change drivers. Following on from the methods used in the Projecting Responses of Ecological Diversity In Changing Terrestrial Systems (PREDICTS) project, this PhD will for the first time, gather empirical evidence to uncover global patterns of vector and non-vector invertebrate community responses to land-use change and other global change drivers. The project would involve using machine learning analytics to gather data from literature and other primary data sources to generate spatial and temporal models of how vector abundances and distributions respond to current and future environmental variables.

Policy Impact:

Diseases transmitted by arthropod vectors such as mosquitoes, ticks and midges are major contributors to the global burden of infectious disease. Understanding the interplay between environmental and socioeconomic factors at different spatial scales within a changing climate is essential for the successful management of disease risk in the future.

Background Reading:
Newbold, T. et al. Global effects of land use on local terrestrial biodiversity. Nature 520, 45 (2015).
Newbold, T. Future effects of climate and land-use change on terrestrial vertebrate community diversity under different scenarios. Proc. R. Soc. B 285, 20180792 (2018).
Olival et al. Host and viral traits predict zoonotic spillover from mammals. Nature 546: 646-650

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear ,

Kate Jones submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 06/07/2018 at 11:31 am, listing Tim Newbold as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Tim Newbold is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Understanding the response of disease vectors to land-use change (Ref: 15610)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Kate Jones (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL), Tim Newbold (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Kate Jones kate.e.jones@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Kate,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 05/06/2024.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Kate Jones kate.e.jones@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Kate,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “Understanding the response of disease vectors to land-use change” has not been updated since 30/06/2021. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 05/06/2024, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Kate Jones kate.e.jones@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 15610) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Kate,

Project (ref: 15610) “Understanding the response of disease vectors to land-use change”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Mark Trimmer m.trimmer@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Mark,

Elisabetta Versace has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Bees and the Morse code (Ref: 15617)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Elisabetta Versace (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL), Yannick Wurm (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL)

Description:

Animals don’t need large brains to cope with their complex environment: with their tiny brains, insects exhibit sophisticated behaviours that increase their fitness. Remarkable differences between species remain to be understood. Think about bees. Both honeybees and bumblebees forage for their colonies but only honeybees communicate the location of food to their mates through a specific behaviour called waggle dance. Is this a specific adaptation that has no implications besides communication about food, or are honeybees better equipped for learning patterns in general? To answer this question, we will test whether honeybees and bumblebees have different abilities to learn rhythmic patterns presented as flashing lights, as in the Morse code. Foragers will be trained to gain a sucrose reward by choosing between lights that flash according to patterns that follow different rules. The ability to learn different rules has been studied in different mammals and birds but whether insects exhibit rule learning abilities is an open question. Bees are an ideal candidate to address this issue because we know they can learn abstract concepts such as “same” and “different”, and because the comparison between bumblebees and honeybees can tell us something about the existence of general or specialised learning abilities as a result of adaptive processes.

Policy Impact:

Bees are fundamental pollinators for agriculture and in wild ecosystems, with a pivotal role in biodiversity. Understanding bees’ behavioural ecology and cognitive abilities is crucial especially now that bees are under threat due to different climatic and anthropogenic factors. 

Background Reading:
Motivational trade-offs and modulation of nociception in bumblebees
Giurfa, M., Zhang, S., Jenett, A., Menzel, R., Srinivasan, M. V, 2001. The concepts of “sameness” and “difference” in an insect. Nature. 410, 930–933.
Versace, E., Spierings, M.J., Caffini, M., ten Cate, C., Vallortigara, G., 2017. Spontaneous generalization of abstract multimodal patterns in young domestic chicks. Animal Cognition. 20, 521–529.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear ,

Elisabetta Versace at QMUL has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Yannick Wurm as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for QMUL School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Yannick Wurm is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Bees and the Morse code (Ref: 15617)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Elisabetta Versace (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL), Yannick Wurm (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Mark Trimmer m.trimmer@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Mark,

Elisabetta Versace submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 05/09/2018 at 4:49 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

Bees and the Morse code (Ref: 15617)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Elisabetta Versace (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL), Yannick Wurm (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL)

Description:

Animals don’t need large brains to cope with their complex environment: with their tiny brains, insects exhibit sophisticated behaviours that increase their fitness. Remarkable differences between species remain to be understood. Think about bees. Both honeybees and bumblebees forage for their colonies but only honeybees communicate the location of food to their mates through a specific behaviour called waggle dance. Is this a specific adaptation that has no implications besides communication about food, or are honeybees better equipped for learning patterns in general? To answer this question, we will test whether honeybees and bumblebees have different abilities to learn rhythmic patterns presented as flashing lights, as in the Morse code. Foragers will be trained to gain a sucrose reward by choosing between lights that flash according to patterns that follow different rules. The ability to learn different rules has been studied in different mammals and birds but whether insects exhibit rule learning abilities is an open question. Bees are an ideal candidate to address this issue because we know they can learn abstract concepts such as “same” and “different”, and because the comparison between bumblebees and honeybees can tell us something about the existence of general or specialised learning abilities as a result of adaptive processes.

Policy Impact:

Bees are fundamental pollinators for agriculture and in wild ecosystems, with a pivotal role in biodiversity. Understanding bees’ behavioural ecology and cognitive abilities is crucial especially now that bees are under threat due to different climatic and anthropogenic factors. 

Background Reading:
Motivational trade-offs and modulation of nociception in bumblebees
Giurfa, M., Zhang, S., Jenett, A., Menzel, R., Srinivasan, M. V, 2001. The concepts of “sameness” and “difference” in an insect. Nature. 410, 930–933.
Versace, E., Spierings, M.J., Caffini, M., ten Cate, C., Vallortigara, G., 2017. Spontaneous generalization of abstract multimodal patterns in young domestic chicks. Animal Cognition. 20, 521–529.

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To:
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear ,

Elisabetta Versace submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 05/09/2018 at 4:49 pm, listing Yannick Wurm as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Yannick Wurm is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

Bees and the Morse code (Ref: 15617)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Elisabetta Versace (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL), Yannick Wurm (School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, QMUL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Annual Project Check Email

To: Elisabetta Versace e.versace@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Elisabetta,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

To ensure that all advertised projects are practicable, if you do not confirm that a project is still up-to-date, or make edits to ensure that it is, then the project will be automatically removed from the website on 02/10/2026.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Elisabetta Versace e.versace@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Elisabetta,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “Bees and the Morse code” has not been updated since 22/02/2024. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 02/10/2026, your project will be removed from the website.

Please click here to check and update your projects now.

For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Elisabetta Versace e.versace@qmul.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 15617) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Elisabetta,

Project (ref: 15617) “Bees and the Morse code”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and complete the annual project check process.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|

[Create] Project Approval Email

To: Eileen Cox E.Cox@nhm.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Eileen,

Alfried Vogler has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

The meconium as a unique source of eDNA for determining the diet of social wasps (Ref: 15620)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Alfried Vogler (Life Sciences Department, NHM), Seirian Sumner (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL)

Description:

Social wasps live in societies of 100s-1000s of individuals. The worker wasps hunt arthropod prey or scavenge animal protein to feed their larvae: this makes them important in the ecosystem as regulators of arthropod populations. However, we know very little about what wasps actually eat, and thus lack the information to assess their role in the ecosystem as predators. This studentship will use metabarcoding analyses of the waste products of wasp larvae – the meconium – to determine what wasps eat. Each larva accumulates the solid metabolic waste in the gut over its lifetime and excretes it as a meconium immediately prior to pupation. The meconium remains attached to the nest, even after the nest has been abandoned. Because the waste is highly condensed and desiccated, DNA is extremely well preserved and provides an entire record of food intake of individual larvae. The meconium therefore is a rich source of information for ecological, evolutionary and demographic studies of social wasps.

The student will use metabarcoding analyses of meconia from a range of social wasp species from contemporary and historic nests, to address questions including: (a) how does demography and seasonality affect resource use by social wasps? (b) Can diet differences between co-existing native and invasive species (e.g. Asian hornets) reveal the ecosystem impact of invasive social wasps? (c) Is there a phylogenetic basis to species-level differences in wasp diets? (d) Can historic wasp meconia, from nests in museum collections, be used to deduce changes in diet with environmental and land-use change?

Policy Impact:

Meconia can be obtained easily from abandoned nests and hold some of the best-preserved environmental DNA (eDNA) anywhere, which has not been appreciated in the existing literature. The methodology will transform the study of wasp biology and their ecological role and impact through time and space.

Background Reading:
Sumner, S., Law, G. & Cini, A. (2018) Why we love bees and hate wasps. Ecological Entomology.
Andújar, C., et al. (2018). Why the COI barcode should be the community DNA metabarcode for the Metazoa. Molecular Ecology
Bohmann, K., et al. (2014). Environmental DNA for wildlife biology and biodiversity monitoring. Trends in Ecology & Evolution

CASE Partner: NatureMetrics (https://www.naturemetrics.co.uk)

Please click here to approve or reject this project submission.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Create] Second Sup Approval Email

To: Andrew Pomiankowski a.pomiankowski@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: PhD Project Submission for your Approval

Dear Andrew,

Alfried Vogler at NHM has submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP, listing Seirian Sumner as a second supervisor. The project and primary supervisor are currently pending approval by the local organiser for NHM Life Sciences Department, but as approver for we also require your confirmation that Seirian Sumner is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

The meconium as a unique source of eDNA for determining the diet of social wasps (Ref: 15620)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Alfried Vogler (Life Sciences Department, NHM), Seirian Sumner (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

| The London NERC DTP | Follow us on TWITTER​ | Like us on FACEBOOK|


[Reminder] Project Approval Email

To: Eileen Cox E.Cox@nhm.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD Project Submission awaiting your Approval

Dear Eileen,

Alfried Vogler submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 27/09/2018 at 2:38 pm. The project is currently pending your approval before it is posted online.

The meconium as a unique source of eDNA for determining the diet of social wasps (Ref: 15620)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Alfried Vogler (Life Sciences Department, NHM), Seirian Sumner (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL)

Description:

Social wasps live in societies of 100s-1000s of individuals. The worker wasps hunt arthropod prey or scavenge animal protein to feed their larvae: this makes them important in the ecosystem as regulators of arthropod populations. However, we know very little about what wasps actually eat, and thus lack the information to assess their role in the ecosystem as predators. This studentship will use metabarcoding analyses of the waste products of wasp larvae – the meconium – to determine what wasps eat. Each larva accumulates the solid metabolic waste in the gut over its lifetime and excretes it as a meconium immediately prior to pupation. The meconium remains attached to the nest, even after the nest has been abandoned. Because the waste is highly condensed and desiccated, DNA is extremely well preserved and provides an entire record of food intake of individual larvae. The meconium therefore is a rich source of information for ecological, evolutionary and demographic studies of social wasps.

The student will use metabarcoding analyses of meconia from a range of social wasp species from contemporary and historic nests, to address questions including: (a) how does demography and seasonality affect resource use by social wasps? (b) Can diet differences between co-existing native and invasive species (e.g. Asian hornets) reveal the ecosystem impact of invasive social wasps? (c) Is there a phylogenetic basis to species-level differences in wasp diets? (d) Can historic wasp meconia, from nests in museum collections, be used to deduce changes in diet with environmental and land-use change?

Policy Impact:

Meconia can be obtained easily from abandoned nests and hold some of the best-preserved environmental DNA (eDNA) anywhere, which has not been appreciated in the existing literature. The methodology will transform the study of wasp biology and their ecological role and impact through time and space.

Background Reading:
Sumner, S., Law, G. & Cini, A. (2018) Why we love bees and hate wasps. Ecological Entomology.
Andújar, C., et al. (2018). Why the COI barcode should be the community DNA metabarcode for the Metazoa. Molecular Ecology
Bohmann, K., et al. (2014). Environmental DNA for wildlife biology and biodiversity monitoring. Trends in Ecology & Evolution

CASE Partner: NatureMetrics (https://www.naturemetrics.co.uk)

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The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

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[Reminder] Second Sup Approval Email

To: Andrew Pomiankowski a.pomiankowski@ucl.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Reminder: PhD project submission awaiting your approval

Dear Andrew,

Alfried Vogler submitted a PhD Project to the London NERC DTP on 27/09/2018 at 2:38 pm, listing Seirian Sumner as a second supervisor. We require your confirmation that Seirian Sumner is eligible to act as secondary supervisor. Please click here to complete our short second supervisor approval form.

The meconium as a unique source of eDNA for determining the diet of social wasps (Ref: 15620)

Theme: Biodiversity, Ecology & Conservation
Supervisory Team: Alfried Vogler (Life Sciences Department, NHM), Seirian Sumner (Genetics, Evolution and Environment, UCL)

Please click here to complete our approval form.

Best wishes,

The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

London, WC1E 6BT

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Annual Project Check Email

To: Alfried Vogler a.vogler@nhm.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: IMPORTANT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Alfried,

In order to keep the exemplar project list on the website up-to-date, we ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Please click here to check the projects you currently have listed on the website (you will be asked to log in).

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The DTP Admin Team

The London NERC DTP

UCL, Pearson Building

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Warning (1) – Project Will be Hidden in 2 weeks

To: Alfried Vogler a.vogler@nhm.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: URGENT: Please check and update your exemplar projects

Dear Alfried,

We ask academics to check their listed projects once a year and remove or edit any that are no longer practicable. Your exemplar project, “The meconium as a unique source of eDNA for determining the diet of social wasps” has not been updated since 25/09/2023. If you do not log in and either confirm that the project is up-to-date or make edits to the project before 24/09/2024, your project will be removed from the website.

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For each project, please click ‘Check / Update’ to view the current advert. If you are happy with the project, please check the box at the bottom confirm that no changes are necessary. If changes are needed, please click the edit button and submit your edits for approval.

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Warning (2) – Project Hidden

To: Alfried Vogler a.vogler@nhm.ac.uk
From: London NERC DTP londonnercdtp.admin@ucl.ac.uk
Subject: Notification: Your project (ref: 15620) has been removed from the DTP website due to inactivity

Dear Alfried,

Project (ref: 15620) “The meconium as a unique source of eDNA for determining the diet of social wasps”

We first contacted you on 6 weeks ago asking you to check the exemplar projects you have listed on the London NERC DTP website. As we have not received confirmation that your project is up-to-date, or new edits to bring the project advert up-to-date, the project has now been removed from the website. To restore the project, please log in and