DTP Researcher Networking Profiles

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Institute of Zoology,
Zoological Society of London

My research combines theoretical approaches and comparative analyses to look at broad scale patterns in ecology related to body size, diet and trophic level. My recent work has focused the body size scaling of prey selection and abundance in predators, and patterns in animal space use. I also work with projects examining human-wildlife interactions particularly focusing on the impacts of altered landscapes on wildlife ecology and species richness. This research includes examining ways to improve wildlife monitoring methods, particularly focusing on the use of camera traps to estimate mammalian biodiversity.

Institute of Zoology,
Zoological Society of London

Trent Garner is a Reader and Theme Leader of Evolution and Molecular Ecology at ZSL’s Institute of Zoology. An experimental ecologist at heart, his group and collaborators work on the evolutionary and ecological dynamics of amphibian infectious diseases. Most of his projects are funded by either NERC or the Morris Animal Foundation, and his primary objective is to ascertain when infectious diseases pose a conservation threat to amphibians, and developing mitigation strategies when they do.

Department of Life Sciences,
Brunel University London

My research covers a range of topics related to the development of analytical methodology for the determination of contaminants in different environmental compartments of water, air, biota and land using techniques such as high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS), tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) and 2D liquid chromatography (LC/LC). My research is used to assess animal and human exposure to chemicals. I utilize bioassay directed fractionation to isolate and identify biologically active substances and I address unknowns through the development of new strategies in data interpretation using spectral and chromatographic deconvolution and chemometric methods. My research involves the identification and analysis of disinfection by-products in waste and potable water and in the development of innovative water treatment technologies for the removal of micropollutants and by-products from water to mitigate exposure.

Department of Life Sciences,
Brunel University London

My main research interest is in environmental change in the geological record, with focus on mass extinctions (especially the Permian-Triassic boundary event), ancient reef systems (especially Silurian and Devonian systems) and Quaternary sea level change. This work focusses on both slow and rapid environmental changes. Geohazard work in modern times associated with rapid changes is undertaken largely with PhD students.

Department of Life Sciences,
Brunel University London

Combination effects of chemical mixtures, identifying chemical mixtures of relevance in the environment and in wildlife tissues, bioassay-directed extraction and fractionation of tissue material with the aim of identifying emerging pollutants.

Department of Organismal Biology,
Queen Mary University of London

My research has developed methods for interpreting genetic and genomic data to infer the history of organisms – particularly invasions of new habitat, on scales ranging from the spread of viruses in the human body, the spread of wildlife viruses through natural populations, and postglacial range expansion of whole species. My current research is extending these methods to identify regions of the genome under spatially varying selection. I currently coordinate a European network of 13 young PhD researchers (INTERCROSSING) from 9 different countries combining bioinformatics, statistics and genetic approaches in projects spanning industry and academia.

Institute of Zoology,
Zoological Society of London

I head the Environmental Monitoring and Conservation Modelling (EMCM) team, which is interested in developing tools and methodologies supporting the sustainable management of natural resources. My own research is about assessing and predicting the impacts of global environmental change on biodiversity and ecosystem services, with a particular focus on climate change and satellite data; the aim is to conduct high quality, innovative and internationally recognized research through a multi-disciplinary approach involving statistics, remote sensing and programming. Extensive experience with remote sensing data and its usefulness in ecology and conservation drives my interest in promoting a better integration of satellite-based data in global monitoring programs.

Department of Life Sciences,
Brunel University London

I am a molecular endocrinologist and aquatic ecotoxicologist with an interest in the effects of endocrine active chemicals on aquatic wildlife. I am also active in research to protect humans from diseases associated with exposure to biological contaminants in freshwater, including legionella (pathogenic bacteria) and schistosomiasis (parasitic disease). I am programme leader for the Masters in Sustainability, Entrepreneurship and Design which provides entrepreneurial students with the skills and mind-set to help build a sustainable future; one that is environmentally responsible and socially inclusive.

Department of Computer Science,
Brunel University London

I am interested in data mining, machine learning and Big data, with a focus on biological, clinical and ecological domains. As a Senior Lecturer at Brunel University London I have worked in conjunction with Leiden University Medical School and UCL on gene regulatory networks and this work is currently being expanded to explore networks across systems of increasing complexity. My current projects include modelling high dimensional gene expression data (focussing on integration of multiple studies for wheat) with Rothamsted research, modelling visual field test data from Moorfield’s Eye Hospital, and exploring the dynamics of fish populations in the Northern Atlantic using hidden Markov models and other state space models in conjunction with the Canadian Department of Fisheries and Oceans and DEFRA.

School of Geography,
Queen Mary University of London

Geraldene Wharton’s reserach in hydrogeomorphology and hydroecology focuses on: the interactions between water, plants and sediments in rivers; the nature and dynamics of fine cohesive sediment in rivers; and river restoration. One on-going area of research is considering the processes and environmental impacts of colmation (the ingress of fine sediments into river beds) through a combination of field measurements and laboratory flume experiments. My work in river restoration is more applied and has focused on the appraisal of restoration projects including the development of a methodology for the assessment of rivers and their surrounding areas for the Environment Agency’s National Environmental Assessment Service (NEAS).

Department of Life Sciences,
Brunel University London

My general background is in marine and freshwater biology, prior to working at Brunel University I worked at the Environment Agency (National Fisheries Laboratory) in fisheries management especially fish disease and parasitology; including invasive species. My main interests are in sub-lethal effects (developmental, reproductive and immune) of environmental contaminants in aquatic species (mainly molluscs and fish) and developing gastropod molluscs as models in eco-toxicology and comparative biology. I’ve also been working on projects using in vitro and in vivo approaches to test the efficacy of new wastewater treatment technologies to reduce aquatic pollution.

Department of Life Sciences,
Natural History Museum, London

My research interests are in macroevolution and macroecology. I mostly use phylogenetic comparative methods, morphological data collected from museum specimens, along with other large databases, to answer questions about broad-scale patterns of biodiversity. Most of my work has been on vertebrates but the methods I use can be applied across all clades. I’m also interested in incorporating fossil data into analyses of living species and vice versa.

Department of Computer Science,
Brunel University London

I am Lecturer in the Department of Computer Science at Brunel University. My current research is primarily focused on the development of artificial intelligence methods and algorithms for large scale optimisation, systems of equations, data analysis, graphs and networks. I have extensively used and developed machine learning methods as well as ensembles or hybrids of these methods by combining them in various ways and for various applications. My research has materialised in several efficient artificial intelligent methods general enough to tackle problems in a connected data analysis environment: classification, clustering, prediction, optimisation, data mining and decision making, both in a static as well as in a dynamic environment.

Department of Life Sciences,
Brunel University London

My research interests include fundamental aspects of mollusc biology such as embryonic development, internal defence systems and endocrine systems, and in particular the interaction of molluscs (e.g. snails), with multiple environmental stressors such as parasites and pollution. I have considerable experience of investigating host-parasite interactions (especially snail-trematode) at the molecular level principally through differential gene expression techniques, such as microarrays. I am also interested in genome/transcriptome analysis and am involved with the annotation of the intermediate host snail Biomphalaria glabrata genome project. I am also interested in the development of invertebrate model organisms, and have investigated on the effects of androgens on molluscs with a view to developing the snail as a new model organism.

Department of Earth Sciences,
Natural History Museum, London

Professor MacLeod is perhaps best known for his work documenting patterns and understanding the causes of Phanerozoic extinctions, especially the end-Cretaceous mass extinction event where he is a leading proponent of the multiple-cause model. Equal in terms of output and prominence is his theoretical, methodological, and applied work in morphometrics where he was an early proponent of geometric morphometrics, the use of outline semilandmarks, the morphometric characterization of 3D surfaces, and most recently the application of computer vision and machine learning methods to morphological analysis. Other research interests include macroevolution, evolutionary rates, quantitative biostratigraphy, applied statistics, and quantitative data analysis.

Department of Life Sciences,
Brunel University London

Building on a background in both natural and social sciences, my research interests lie with developing solutions to the practical challenges of translating science into policy. They are focused on emerging issues for the risk assessment of contaminants, such as mixtures and endocrine disrupters, in the context of the suitability of existing legal instruments, more particularly the REACH Directive, Plant Protection Products Regulation and Water Framework Directive.

Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering,
Brunel University London

I am an ecotoxicologist and analytical chemist mainly researching impacts of environmental pollutants on aquatic wildlife (otters, cetaceans, seals, sea birds) and aquaculture research. I use chemical analysis and biomarkers (sex hormones, detoxification enzymes, proteins) in projects to monitor populations exposed to pollutants in the wild. These studies are supported by in vitro studies of toxic mechanisms (e.g. endocrine disruption, reproductive toxicity) as these effects hamper recovery of wild populations impacted by epizootics, oil spills, over-fishing, climate change, habitat destruction. My projects involve field and lab work and working with live animals in collaborations with the RSPCA wildlife centers.

School of Geography,
Queen Mary University of London

My research specialisms lie in geomorphology, river science and geomatics. Specific interests include hydrological and hydraulic modelling and Earth observation, in particular: rainfall-runoff and flood inundation modelling; gravel sediment transport and channel morphodynamics; hydrometry; environmental remote sensing including terrestrial, airborne and satellite remote sensing; lidar and laser scanning; digital elevation modelling and visualization. My research has most recently focused on understanding the processes controlling the dynamics of river systems in alpine environments in New Zealand, Nepal and the Pyrenees.

Department of Life Sciences,
Brunel University London

I have a background in environmental pollution and ecotoxicology with a focus on identifying and assessing endocrine disrupting chemicals in aquatic fish species. My current research focusses on parasite behaviour and uses methods associated with identifying key pollutants in complex matrices to identify and isolate a chemical attractant of Schistosoma mansoni from its snail host. I am involved in a multi-disciplinary team who plan to use this attractant to create and deploy a decoy artificial snail host (DASH) to interrupt the transmission of Schistosomiasis in effected countries. Consequently, I am also interested in the dilution effect theory.

Department of Life Sciences,
Brunel University London

Professor Suzanne Leroy is an internationally renowned palynologist working on Eurasian Quaternary lacustrine sediment, mostly from the Caspian Seas, Dead Sea, Turkish, and central Asian lakes. Her work has provided key data to initiate the reconstruction of CS vegetation and climate changes for the last 14,000 years. SL has been part of several EU projects (eg RELIEF on earthquake limnology and Marie Curie ITN PRIDE 2015-2019 with 2 PhD students at BUL). BP have been helpful in opening doors to study CS changes. Over the years she published > 100 Thomson–Reuters rated research articles (H-index 27). Her interests are: Palynology, past vegetation and past environments; Palaeoclimate; Past natural hazards; Past biodiversity; From the Sahara to Central Asia; From the Pliocene to the present (and future).

School of Geography,
Queen Mary University of London

My research interests combine ecology, remote sensing and the terrestrial carbon cycle, with particular emphasis on forest ecology and data assimilation. I am interested in answering questions on the structure and functioning of terrestrial ecosystems, how these vary with environmental conditions and how these will change with climate change. My approach is strongly mathematical and computational and I am interested in applying novel methods for data analysis.

Department of Geography,
Kings College London

I am a broadly trained geographer and landscape ecologist with expertise in developing bespoke computational and statistical modelling tools to investigate spatial ecological and socio-economic processes and their interaction. My research interests include agent-based modelling of socio-ecological systems, ecological succession-disturbance dynamics (including wildfire and herbivory), land use/cover change, forest and agricultural landscapes (mainly in Mediterranean and Temperate climates), and the epistemology of modelling and simulation.

Department of Earth Sciences,
Natural History Museum, London

My research focuses on understading types, mechanisms and timescale of pre- and syn-eruptive magmatic processes at active volcanoes in order to inform volcanic hazard assessment. I use the rocks erupted during volcanic eruptions to understand the hidden processes inside the volcano, as a psychologist explores the human interior. I mostly focus on active highly explosive volcanoes in subduction zones, time-scales of magmatic processes and pre-eruptive magma degassing conditions. I am also interested in lithosphere evolution and relationships between magmatism and tectonics. I approach these problems using micro-analytical techniques and geochemical and isotope analyses.

Department of Clinical Sciences,
Brunel University London

My main research interests are on endocrine disruption and the impacts of environmental contaminants on human health, specifically breast cancer. I am also interested in mixture toxicology and the development of alternative approaches to animal testing (including organotypic 3D cell culture models). Finally, I am involved in dissecting the mechanisms of chemical carcinogenesis (specifically in breast) and investigating the potential role of epigenetics in mediating the impact of environmental contaminants on cancer development.

Department of Earth Sciences,
University College London

I am interested in understanding the flow of complex systems. I have studied a wide range of materials from the atomic scale (glassy materials) to the geophysical scale (sea ice). While often of fundamental nature my research is always intended to address practical challenges in both the field of material sciences and climate sciences. This approach is clearly evidenced in my recent work in the construction of new models for the physical processes included in the sea ice component of the climate models combining the development of fundamental new theory and numerical simulations with field measurements and remotely-sensed observations.

Department of Life Sciences,
Natural History Museum, London

I am a researcher at the NHM working of trematodes and snails of medical and veterinary importance with a particular interest in neglected tropical diseases. My expertise is: molecular epidemiology, population genetics, molecular biogeography, systematics, taxonomy, evolution and molecular diagnostics.

I am interested in the mechanisms that generate diversity in marine species-rich biomes (particularly the Indo-West Pacific Ocean) and the factors that drive cladogenesis, both extrinsic and intrinsic factors that may act globally, regionally or locally and the factors that contribute to phenotypic diversity. I am interested both in the effects of large-scale events that have modified entire communities (e.g. sea-level change, tectonic events, global climate change) and the evolution of key innovations (including trophic shifts, loss of eyes and the evolution of colour). In recent projects I have been looking at colour in molluscs and echinoderms.

Mollusca, biogeography, evolution, colour
Environmental Research Group,
Kings College London

My research interests focus on the measurement of particles and gases, and their use in source apportionment and health studies, to improve our understanding in both the urban and global environment.

Measurement obviously forms a key part of my research and I have a significant suite of analytical equipment deployed either in the laboratory or in the field. Some are stationed permanently at research observatories in London, funded by Defra. These monitor and disseminate the chemical and physical composition of aerosols in real time to inform forecasting and public information systems. The measurements are also used in epidemiological studies to assess the impact of particles and their different composition on health end points. Recent developments have included a large mobile measurement facility; this been deployed to measure pollutants emitted from industrial sources in Wales. A miniaturised version has been deployed close to agricultural fires in China and SE Asia; the results from this have reduced the uncertainty in the emission factors used in global models to represent this source.

I use the latest source apportionment methodologies being developed to interpret the high time resolution chemical composition measurements and quantify the contribution of different emission sources in complex urban environments. In these environments a wide variety of sources, both local (such as traffic) and distant (such as that from agricultural sources), contribute to the total particle load in the atmosphere which we are exposed to. There is a lack of understanding relating to the magnitude of these different influences, how they vary both geographically and temporally and their impact on health.

Air Quality, Aerosols, Particulate Matter, Health Effects, Source Apportionment
Natural Capital and Plant Health,
Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew

Plant domestication hugely increased our capacity to produce food and enabled the development of civilisation. But it came at a cost: seriously depleted genetic diversity in crop species caused by population bottlenecks. To meet the food needs of the world, plant breeders need more genetic diversity to make further improvements in crop productivity and assist adaptation to increasingly extreme climatic conditions. My research goals are to understand the genetic changes that occurred during plant domestication and to restore lost diversity to crop species.

Plant domestication, Crop genetics, Plant breeding, Genome evolution, Polyploidy

My research aims to understand how cooperation between hosts and symbiotic microbes evolves, and what the consequences of these relationships are for host ecology and evolution. In my lab we seek to understand symbiotic interactions at all levels, from molecules, to ecology, and at a macro-evolutionary scale. My research combines theoretical predictions from ecology and evolution with large-scale empirical tests, using the latest molecular and experimental techniques – including evolutionary genetics, genomics, comparative methods, theoretical modelling, and laboratory in vivo experiments.

Current research themes investigate: how beneficial microbes aid in host adaptation to ecological niches, what causes major evolutionary transitions to permanent symbioses, and understanding the structure and function of insect microbiomes.

For more information: http://www.sbcs.qmul.ac.uk/staff/leehenry.html

Ecology and systematics of termites, ants, beetles and earthworms, with a particular interest in the role of ecosystem engtineers in ecological processes and their role in providing ecosystem services.

termites, ants, beetles, earthworms, soils, ecosystem engineers, ecosystem services
Biodiversity Informatics and Spatial Analysis,
Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew

My research is interdisciplinary, examining environmental questions and problems through the combination of theories and methods from geography and ecology. My research initially focused on modelling species’ distributions and connectivity across landscapes for applications in conservation ecology, wildlife epidemiology, and invasion ecology. More recently I have been expanding my research interests to incorporate landscape dynamics resulting from climate change and human interactions with the environment. I currently have numerous ongoing research projects across all of these themes that involve collaborators in Canada, the UK, and New Zealand. While my research is generally driven by environmental questions and problems, where necessary my research also includes the development of new methods and algorithms. I also have technical interests in computer programming and the use and development of open-source and cross-platform scientific software, and I develop and publish my own software when I require it to support my research.

X-Ray 3D Computed Tomography of Sediments and Soils
Glacial Geomorphology and Sedimentology (modern and past environments)
Quaternary Science (particularly relating to the Last Glaciation of NW Europe)
Sediment structure, porosity, fabric and deformation
Micro-scale analysis of sediment (thin sections, SEM)

Our research evaluates the roles of multiple environmental perturbations (e.g. climate warming), foraging behavior, and other organismal traits on the complexity, structure, and dynamics of communities and ecosystems. We seek to develop a mechanistic understanding of processes that control species diversity and its consequences for ecosystem function and services. Our work spans a range of approaches to testing eco-evolutionary hypotheses, including manipulative experiments (in microcosms, chemostats, bromeliad phytotelmata, and mesocosms), theory, and integrative analysis of time series data from diverse natural systems such as ponds, lakes, estuaries, and tropical rain forests. Although we focus on aquatic food webs, the questions and approaches are broadly applicable across ecosystems.

My main research interest is on the impact of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) on gynaecological malignancies. More specifically, our Cellular Endocrinology Laboratory is interested in investigating the impact of Bisphenol A (BPA) in the aetiopathogenesis of ovarian cancer as well as it's involvement in the process of placentation, preeclampsia and preterm birth.

Natural Capital and Plant health,
Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew

Plant genomics, evolution, plant health, ash dieback, acute oak decline, dwarf birch, phylogenomics, genome sequencing, polyploidy, hybridisation

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