Managing ecosystem services trade-offs between diverse socio-ecological systems in coastal Bangladesh

Theme: Pan-disciplinary

Main Supervisor:

Michael Chadwick

Geography, KCL

Second Supervisor:

Helen Adams

Geography, KCL

Project Description:

A mosaic of socio-ecological systems in the deltaic floodplain on the coast of Bangladesh supports rice and shrimp cultivation and a range of a capture fisheries. Assessment of ecosystem service trade-offs between rice and shrimp are well publicised. Less well studied, although recognised locally as a problem, are trade-offs between aquaculture and capture fisheries. Understanding the dynamics of potential conflicts is vital given the direct and immediate consequences for local stakeholders whose health and livelihoods are dependent on the open access resources that fisheries provide. In this highly interdisciplinary PhD, the student will investigate the trade-offs between aquaculture and fisheries and the implications for human wellbeing through the integration and quantitative analysis of unique datasets collected in the deltaic flood plain of Bangladesh: a seasonal household livelihoods survey and monthly fish landing data. Quantification of local biophysical conditions and fisheries yields will be used to complement these secondary datasets. Methodologically, the project will utilize a resilience theory framework, analysing the flows of ecosystem services between socio-ecological systems over time. A central aim of the research will be to improve current understanding of how better ecosystem management across socio-ecological systems can promote poverty alleviation, particularly in the context of changing climate conditions and worsening environmental quality, and especially through improved governance and adaptive management.

Policy Impact of Research:

A central aim of the research will be to improve current understanding of how better ecosystem management across socio-ecological systems can promote poverty alleviation, particularly in the context of changing climate conditions and worsening environmental quality, and especially through improved governance and adaptive management.


Applications are CLOSED.

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